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How would you go about testing this with rspec?

class SomeClass
  def map_url(size)
    GoogleMap.new(point: model.location.point, size: size).map_url
  end
end
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The fact that your test seems "very coupled and brittle to mock" is a sign that the code itself is doing too many things at once.

To highlight the problem, look at this implementation of map_url, which is meaningless (returning "foo" for any size input) and yet passes your tests:

class SomeClass
  def map_url(size)
    GoogleMap.new.map_url
    GoogleMap.new(point: model.location.point, size: size)
    return "foo"
  end
end

Notice that:

  1. A new map is being initiated with the correct arguments, but is not contributing to the return value.
  2. map_url is being called on a newly-initiated map, but not the one initiated with the correct arguments.
  3. The result of map_url is not being returned.

I'd argue that the problem is that the way you have structured your code makes it look simpler than it actually is. As a result, your tests are too simple and thus fall short of fully covering the method's behaviour.

This comment from David Chelimsky seems relevant here:

There is an old guideline in TDD that suggests that you should listen to your tests because when they hurt there is usually a design problem. Tests are clients of the code under test, and if the test hurts, then so do all of the other clients in the codebase. Shortcuts like this quickly become an excuse for poor designs. I want it to stay painful because it should hurt to do this.

Following this advice, I'd suggest first splitting the code into two separate methods, to isolate concerns:

class SomeClass
  def new_map(size)
    GoogleMap.new(point: model.location.point, size: size)
  end

  def map_url(size)
    new_map(size).map_url
  end
end

Then you can test them separately:

describe SomeClass do
  let(:some_class) { SomeClass.new }
  let(:mock_map) { double('map') }

  describe "#new_map" do
    it "returns a GoogleMap with the correct point and size" do
      map = some_class.new_map('300x600')
      map.point.should == [1,2]
      map.size.should == '300x600'
    end
  end

  describe "#map_url" do
    before do
      some_class.should_receive(:new_map).with('300x600').and_return(mock_map)
    end          

    it "initiates a new map of the right size and call map_url on it" do
      mock_map.should_receive(:map_url)
      some_class.map_url('300x600')
    end

    it "returns the url" do
      mock_map.stub(map_url: "http://www.example.com")
      some_class.map_url('300x600').should == "http://www.example.com"
    end
  end
end

The resulting test code is a longer and there are 3 specs rather than two, but I think it more clearly and cleanly separates the steps involved in your code, and covers the method behaviour completely. Let me know if this makes sense.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd use let instead of an instance variable for mock_map. And re-write the example names to not use "should" ("it does something" vs "it should do something"). Apart from that: great answer! :) – doesterr Nov 30 '12 at 19:40
    
Maybe noteworthy: the specs rely on GoogleMapbeing tested separately. So make sure that you do that. Imagine a new version of GoogleMap where map_url is renamed to mapurl. The specs from above would still pass, but you should get a failure somewhere else. – doesterr Nov 30 '12 at 19:44
    
About let and the use of "should", agree with both, will make those changes. – shioyama Nov 30 '12 at 22:23
    
That makes a lot of sense shioyama, thanks! However now I'm inclined to make the new_map method private since it's not part of the public API of the class, right? How would I then test it? Seems to me that some have the philosophy that you don't need to test private methods since the tests for the public ones would cover them. – Yeggeps Dec 1 '12 at 12:26
    
@yeggeps Yes to be honest, looking back on this question, I think the most straightforward way to test this method is to just test argument/result pairs & do away with mocks altogether. So e.g., if you know some_class.map_url('300x600') evaluates to http://maps.google.com/...?size=300x300 or whatever, then you can simply test that some_class.map_url('300x600').should == "http//maps.google.com/...?size=300x300, etc. Do a few of those with different configurations to cover the range of possibilities (e.g. different sizes, different values for model.location.point etc.) – shioyama Dec 1 '12 at 14:54

So this is how I did it, it feels very coupled and brittle to mock it like this. Suggestions?

describe SomeClass do
  let(:some_class) { SomeClass.new }

  describe "#map_url" do
    it "should instantiate a GoogleMap with the correct args" do
      GoogleMap.should_receive(:new).with(point: [1,2], size: '300x600') { stub(map_url: nil) }
      some_class.map_url('300x600')
    end

    it "should call map_url on GoogleMap instance" do
      GoogleMap.any_instance.should_receive(:map_url)
      some_class.map_url('300x600')
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Don't you need a some_class = SomeClass.new somewhere in there (e.g. in a before block)? – shioyama Nov 30 '12 at 15:22
    
Yes ofc, updated to the full example, although that's not the point (: – Yeggeps Nov 30 '12 at 15:33

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