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Vastly different output C++ monte carlo approximation

On my 64-bit ubuntu computer, the following code works as expected, and returns a close approximation for pi with both algorithms. However, on the lab machine, where I must demo the code, a 32-bit rhel 3 machine, the second algorithm always returns 4, and I cannot figure out why. Any insight would be appreciated.

/*
 * RandomNumber.h
 *
 *  
 *      
 */

#ifndef RANDOMNUMBER_H_
#define RANDOMNUMBER_H_

class RandomNumber {
public:
RandomNumber() {
    x = time(NULL);
    m = pow(2, 31); //some constant value
    M = 65915 * 7915; //multiply of some simple numbers p and q
    method = 1;
}
RandomNumber(int seed) {
    x = ((seed > 0) ? seed : time(NULL));
    m = pow(2, 31); //some constant value
    method = 1; //method number
    M = 6543 * 7915; //multiply of some simple numbers p and q
}
void setSeed(long int seed) {
    x = seed; //set start value
}

void chooseMethod(int method) {
    this->method = ((method > 0 && method <= 2) ? method : 1); //choose one of two method
}

long int linearCongruential() { //first generator, that uses linear congruential method
    long int c = 0; // some constant
    long int a = 69069; //some constant
    x = (a * x + c) % m; //solution next value
    return x;
}

long int BBS() { //algorithm Blum - Blum - Shub
    x = (long int) (pow(x, 2)) % M;
    return x;
}
double nextPoint() { //return random number in range (-1;1)
    double point;
    if (method == 1) //use first method
        point = linearCongruential() / double(m);
    else
        point = BBS() / double(M);
    return point;
}
private:
long int x; //current value
long int m; // some range for first method
long int M; //some range for second method
int method; //method number
};

#endif /* RANDOMNUMBER_H_ */

And the test class:

#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <iomanip>
#include "RandomNumber.h"
using namespace std;

int main() {
cout.setf(ios::fixed);
cout.precision(6);
RandomNumber random;
srand((unsigned) time(NULL));
cout << "---------------------------------" << endl;
cout << "   Monte Carlo Pi Approximation" << endl;
cout << "---------------------------------" << endl;
cout << " Enter number of points: ";
long int k1;
cin >> k1;
cout << "Select generator number: ";
int method;
cin >> method;
random.chooseMethod(method);
cout << "---------------------------------" << endl;
long int k2 = 0;
double sumX = 0;
double sumY = 0;
for (long int i = 0; i < k1; i++) {
    double x = pow(-1, int(random.nextPoint() * 10) % 2)
            * random.nextPoint();
    double y = pow(-1, int(random.nextPoint() * 10) % 2)
            * random.nextPoint();
    sumX += x;
    sumY += y;
    if ((pow(x, 2) + pow(y, 2)) <= 1)
        k2++;

}
double pi = 4 * (double(k2) / k1);
cout << "M(X)  = " << setw(10) << sumX / k1 << endl; //mathematical expectation of x
cout << "M(Y)  = " << setw(10) << sumY / k1 << endl; //mathematical expectation of y
cout << endl << "Pi = " << pi << endl << endl; //approximate Pi

return 0;
}
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marked as duplicate by Joachim Pileborg, Donal Fellows, BЈовић, Justin ᚅᚔᚈᚄᚒᚔ, bstpierre Nov 30 '12 at 15:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Typically, long is 32 bits on 32-bit architectures and 64 bits on 64-bit architectures. Perhaps you're running afoul of this? –  Angew Nov 30 '12 at 13:52
    
@JoachimPileborg it is similar, however the answer was wrong and I'm no longer using arguments to set the value, and the issue still exists. –  kqualters Nov 30 '12 at 13:53
    
Then please un-accept the accepted answer, and edit the old question instead. Editing the question will bump it, so it won't be lost in the "noise". –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 30 '12 at 14:02

3 Answers 3

The truncation to long in BBS() causes the same "random" number to be generated.

PS. The return from the pow function is a number, which is too big to be represented in your machine's long type. When doing the conversion to long this results in undefined behaviour. One particular effect of the undefined behaviour might be the result of the conversion to be 0x80000000 or 0x7fffffff so you end up with a sequence of the same numbers.

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@chilll could you elaborate on this at all? –  kqualters Nov 30 '12 at 14:13
    
From the example above –  brian beuning Nov 30 '12 at 14:38

The problem is that pow returns a double, which loses precision at the low end. Converting to long int for the % operator always returns the same result, and so your RNG outputs constant -60614748.

x = time(0)                 1354284781
pow(x, 2)                  1.83409e+18   0x1.973fdc9dc7787p+60
(long int) pow(x, 2)       -2147483648    0x80000000
(long int) pow(x, 2) % M     -60614748

The fix is to change x = (long int) (pow(x, 2)) % M; to x = x * x % M, performing all arithmetic within long int. Note that this is still strictly speaking incorrect, as signed overflow is undefined; more correct is to use unsigned long.

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Interestingly, this changes the output from 4.000 constantly to 3.99480 or thereabouts, –  kqualters Nov 30 '12 at 14:25
    
Anything can happen, because, as @ecatmur himself noted, this still triggers undefined behaviour. –  chill Nov 30 '12 at 14:49
x = time(0)                 1354284781
pow(x, 2)                  1.83409e+18   0x1.973fdc9dc7787p+60

A 32-bit int holds a value up to 2^31-1 the value of x^2 is greater than that.

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