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I have an app that may save some files. When the user closes the app, I would like to ask for saving if the user did not already save the file as it is currenty.
If I am not clear enough, I somehow want to check if the file has been modified from the last saving.
I have considered making a Boolean variable that turns to true if the file is saved and then turns back to false every time the file is modified in any way (writing or deleting elements in the file).
My question is if there is any easier solution to do that. It seems to me a lot of useless work to set the variable to true every time the file changes (work both for me and the machine), and I would not want this, since I have a quite wide and complex app, and changes in file are likely to happen quite often.

Edit after the answers: Thank you all, it was really helpful. Eventually I realised that I needed a function that was needed in most of the changes I made to the file, so I didn't need to work so much. The other changes were not so many so I just made the changes to the Boolean.
Thanks again

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1  
To me it seems like a boolean is the best solution. And the fact that you have a wide and complex app, maybe there are things you can do (code to refactor) to simplify it? –  Simon André Forsberg Nov 30 '12 at 14:06
    
It is a 3d app, so it's legit to have a quite wide and complex app –  Bujanca Mihai Nov 30 '12 at 14:16
    
Yes indeed, but adding a simple boolean to it shouldn't be too hard. And you can still have clean code even if you have a complex app. –  Simon André Forsberg Dec 2 '12 at 22:10
1  
True, indeed I realised that I could just call the value change in a method that is called each time an object is displayed or removed, so it won't be so much of a work –  Bujanca Mihai Dec 3 '12 at 14:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If changes aren't likely to happen often then surely the per-change overhead of setting a boolean variable is negligible too.

Ideally you'll have a point in your code that all changes have to go through (for example where you deal with undo/redo) and you can put your boolean variable updating code there.

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It is likely to have changes very often, at least 1 change/10 sec. My point is that for me it would also be a long work since there are quite many different possible chages that might occur –  Bujanca Mihai Nov 30 '12 at 14:19
    
Setting a boolean once per 10 sec has literally no effect on performance. As I said, you should have a central piece of code that controls all the changes to your content. You need it for undo/redo/content validation anyway so the investment of re-factoring your code will definitely pay off. –  biziclop Nov 30 '12 at 14:25
    
Also, having this boolean state variable will allow you to display the usual * next to the file name that users expect to see if a file has changed. –  biziclop Nov 30 '12 at 14:31
    
Yes, thank you. I realised how I could do it without so much work I expected. :) But there are about 1500 lines in my main class and I often don't realise quite simple things. I described in my question what i did. Thank you –  Bujanca Mihai Nov 30 '12 at 14:35

The alternative would be to read the file and check it´s contents against the content of your program, which seems to produce unnecessary overhead. Or to save the time when something has been saved and check if changes has been made since.

Considering that I think your boolean solution is by far the most efficient.

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it would be +1 upvote for save Time check, but -1 downvote for file content check, so it stays neutral. –  AlexWien Nov 30 '12 at 14:09

My propose is to make FileWriter class which remember the state of file (saved / changed) so you only need to use this writer and don't need to deal with boolean operations every time you write to file.

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I like the idea, I think i will try it –  Bujanca Mihai Nov 30 '12 at 14:21

If the document isn't really big, you could keep a copy of it behind the scenes separate from the one the user can edit, and then just compare the two before the app closes.

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Might be quite big document, it will store 3d objects –  Bujanca Mihai Nov 30 '12 at 14:21

A boolean variable is a the best Idea.

boolean isDataChanged

It is nice to read, and does not confuse the code.

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I just found this little bit binary compare method for you on google, no promise if it works ;)

/**
* Compare binary files. Both files must be files (not directories) and exist.
* 
* @param first  - first file
* @param second - second file
* @return boolean - true if files are binery equal
* @throws IOException - error in function
*/
public boolean isFileBinaryEqual(
  File first,
  File second
) throws IOException
{
  // TODO: Test: Missing test
  boolean retval = false;

  if ((first.exists()) && (second.exists()) 
     && (first.isFile()) && (second.isFile()))
  {
     if (first.getCanonicalPath().equals(second.getCanonicalPath()))
     {
        retval = true;
     }
     else
     {
        FileInputStream firstInput = null;
        FileInputStream secondInput = null;
        BufferedInputStream bufFirstInput = null;
        BufferedInputStream bufSecondInput = null;

        try
        {            
           firstInput = new FileInputStream(first); 
           secondInput = new FileInputStream(second);
           bufFirstInput = new BufferedInputStream(firstInput, BUFFER_SIZE); 
           bufSecondInput = new BufferedInputStream(secondInput, BUFFER_SIZE);

           int firstByte;
           int secondByte;

           while (true)
           {
              firstByte = bufFirstInput.read();
              secondByte = bufSecondInput.read();
              if (firstByte != secondByte)
              {
                 break;
              }
              if ((firstByte < 0) && (secondByte < 0))
              {
                 retval = true;
                 break;
              }
           }
        }
        finally
        {
           try
           {
              if (bufFirstInput != null)
              {
                 bufFirstInput.close();
              }
           }
           finally
           {
              if (bufSecondInput != null)
              {
                 bufSecondInput.close();
              }
           }
        }
     }
  }

  return retval;
}

source: http://www.java2s.com/Code/Java/File-Input-Output/Comparebinaryfiles.htm

you just have to create an File object of your currentFile, when you want to save your file, and compare it to you´r existing File ;)

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Thank you, I also had this idea, but seemed to take more of the performance than using the Boolean –  Bujanca Mihai Nov 30 '12 at 14:36

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