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Cool sofware architects wanted:)

I have two entities: Company and User.

When user gets added to Company an Employee entity is created. The Employee represents link between User and Company. Employee entity is useless without access list. In other words I have some invariant: parent entity (Employee) must be created with children (access list).

Im looking for desing solution to implement this invariant in c# code.

Employee entity has constructor with required parameters:

public class Employee
{
    public Employee(EmployeeCreationParams creationParams)
    {
        this.Company = creationParams.Company;
        this.User = creationCommand.User;
    }

    public Company { get; protected set; }

    public User { get; protected set; }

    // other state and logic
}

Child entity:

public class EmployeeAccessList
{
    public EmployeeAccessList(EmployeeAccessListCreationParams creationParams)
    { /* initialization logic */ }

    public Employee { get; protected set; }

    public OperationEnum Operation { get; protected set; }
}

There is generic repository service:

public class Repository
{
    public void Persist<TEntity>(TEntity entity)
    {
        // internal stuff
    }
}

Employee gets created and then persisted:

var employee = new Employee(creationParams);

_repository.Persist(employee);

And acl gets persisted as well:

var accessList = CreateAccessList();

foreach(var acl in accessList)
{
    _repository.Persist(acl);
}

I can't find right way to inject Access List creation login in Employee creation logic. So the both parent and children get creayed as one unit.

I tried to add children creation logic into parents constructor:

public class Employee
{
    public Employee(EmployeeCreationParams creationParams)
    {
        this.Company = creationParams.Company;
        this.User = creationCommand.User;

        var accessList = CreateAccessList();

        foreach(var acl in accessList)
        {
            _repository.Persist(acl);
        }
    }
}

.. but this solution doesn't look right. Children objects gets persisted before parent entity.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you're trying to fit a large number of very different things in too few objects. You should distinguish between 3 separate responsibilities when you create an Employee :

  • Employee instantiation logic, in other words newing up the Employee and all related entities. This is application-agnostic and should be defined in the Domain layer. Since Employee creation seems somewhat complex, a Factory could be a good candidate for that job instead of a bloated Employee constructor.

  • Employee persistence. This belongs in the Infrastructure layer, in your ORM and Repository implementation. It would be a good idea to take advantage of the concept of Aggregate in DDD and of your ORM to automatically persist all entities in the aggregate (including AccessLists) when you're saving an Employee.

  • Deciding when to save the new Employee. This is application-specific and may be performed in your Application layer service at the end of the use case that creates the employee.

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+1 for the Factory suggestion, and for citing the DDD Aggregate concept. –  tallseth Dec 1 '12 at 4:54
    
Thank you! The only difficult part for me is the repository that aware of aggregate root entity (automatically persist all entities in the aggregate). Could you please direct me to some resources that explain this repository ideas & implementation (with Entity Framework if possible). –  Jekas Dec 1 '12 at 7:58
    
I'm no EF expert but I guess this is handled by your change tracker (ObjectContext/DBContext) when you call SaveChanges(). There are many possible Repository implementations - ones with an explicit Save() method that you have to call to persist your entity, ones that internally call SaveChanges() when you Add() an entity, others with no saving logic, leaving it up to their consumer to decide when to save. The important thing is that Repository implementations have a reference to the ORM change tracker/session/object pool so that they can query from it, add to it, etc. –  guillaume31 Dec 2 '12 at 12:16
    
You might want to have a look here for a Repository implementation example : codeproject.com/Tips/309753/… –  guillaume31 Dec 2 '12 at 12:16
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What about this?

public class Employee
{
    public Employee(EmployeeCreationParams creationParams, EmployeeAccessList accessList)
    {
        this.Company = creationParams.Company;
        this.User = creationCommand.User;
        this.Access = accessList
    }
}

public class Repository
{
    public void Persist<TEntity>(TEntity entity)
    {
        // encapsulate the fact that ACLs are stored in a separate way than Employees
    }
}

Then you get the access rights as part of the Company-User relationship, which makes sense. As an implementation detail, you may want to store them in separate tables, but clients of Repository<Employee> don't need to care about that, and you can change that implementation detail later without changing those clients. You can also control transactionality around those two database calls without exposing transactionality implementations to Repository clients.

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Interesting.. You suggest make access list to be part of parent entity state. And with some implementation of Repository when parent entity gets saved, children entities become saved as well. I will try this approach. Thanks! –  Jekas Nov 30 '12 at 15:24
    
Glad to help @Jekas. –  tallseth Dec 1 '12 at 4:52
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This is a rather 'classic' case of mixing bounded contexts really. You have an Identity and Access Control BC and you have, say, an Employee BC (or whatever makes sense in your case - HR, Organisation, etc.). It would be OK to have a UserId in your Employee but you are probably making life harder than it needs to be by including a User object in your Employee BC. It would be OK to have a User Value Object, though.

Hope that helps.

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Thanks for the tip! –  Jekas Dec 1 '12 at 7:54
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