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I am doing rewriting url and testing it with siege and I had one problem.

Sometimes, gwan uses the same address for 2 call of main function in handler connection. To make the difference beetween two call, I use an integer with rand().

In the exemple bellow, we found the same address for 2 calls very close ...

init 1412811699 : buff 0x10d3760 -> GET /imagesproduitnew-100018-imagesgallery/BIG-1.jpg HTTP/1.1

init 687109171 : buff 0x10d3760 -> GET /imagesproduitnew-100018-imagesgallery/BIG-1.jpg HTTP/1.1

regex OK 1412811699 : buff 0x10d3760 -> GET /imagesproduitnew-100018-imagesgallery/BIG-1.jpg HTTP/1.1

extarctPart 1412811699 : buff 0x10d3760 -> GET /imagesproduitnew-100018-imagesgallery/BIG-1.jpg HTTP/1.1

regex OK 687109171 : buff 0x10d3760 -> GET /imagesproduitnew-100018-imagesgallery/BIG-1.jpg HTTP/1.1

rewriteJPG 1412811699 : buff 0x10d3760 -> GET /imagesproduitnew-100018-imagesgallery/BIG-1.jpg HTTP/1.1

xbufreplace 1412811699 : buff 0x10d3760 -> GET /imagesproduitnew/imagesgallery/BIG/100018.jpg HTTP/1.1

-- HERE buffer is changed by the previous step because both have the same address -- 
extarctPart 687109171 : buff 0x10d3760 -> GET /imagesproduitnew/imagesgallery/BIG/100018.jpg HTTP/1.1

To get this problem I use siege from an other server with a list of different URL.

Thanks for your help


I need to rewrite URL : /-100018-imagesgallery/BIG-1.jpg must send to the file /imagesproduitnew/imagesgallery/BIG/100018.jpg

My code for this:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  const long state = (long)argv[0];
  if(state == HDL_AFTER_READ)
  {
    int test = rand();

    xbuf_t *read_xbuf = (xbuf_t*)get_env(argv, READ_XBUF);
    printf ("init %i : buff %p -> %s\n", test, read_xbuf->ptr, read_xbuf->ptr);


    //function to test if URL needs to be rewrite
    if(regexRewriteJPG(read_xbuf->ptr) == 0){
      printf ("regex OK %i : buff %p -> %s\n", test, read_xbuf->ptr, read_xbuf->ptr);

      char *URL;
      char *newURL;
      //extractPart, extract the URL from buffer (/imagesproduitnew-100018-imagesgallery/BIG-1.jpg for exemple)
      URL = extractPart(read_xbuf->ptr, str_regexJPG);
      printf ("extarctPart %i : buff %p -> %s\n", test, read_xbuf->ptr, read_xbuf->ptr);
      if(URL){
        //rewriteJPG return the reel path of the file (/imagesproduitnew/imagesgallery/BIG/100018.jpg for exemple)
        newURL = rewriteJPG(URL);
        printf ("rewriteJPG %i : buff %p -> %s\n", test, read_xbuf->ptr, read_xbuf->ptr);
        if(newURL){
          xbuf_repl(read_xbuf, URL, newURL);
          printf ("xbufreplace %i : buff %p -> %s\n", test, read_xbuf->ptr, read_xbuf->ptr);
          free(newURL);
        }
        else{
          printf("newURL is NULL\n");
        }
        free(URL);
      }
      else{
        printf("URL is NULL\n");
      }
    }
    printf ("END %i : buff %p -> %s\n", test, read_xbuf->ptr, read_xbuf->ptr);
  }
return 255; // execute next connection 
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

This printf() dump of your custom handler's variables surely make sense... once one has access to your handler's source code.

If by "same address for 2 call of main function in handler connection" you mean the READ_XBUF address then keep in mind that:

  • G-WAN internal buffers are re-used on-the-fly to process requests (they are not attached for the life of a connection).

  • printf() will display consecutive (as well as concurrent) connections

  • using a timer will not let you know if requests are concurrent or sequential until you time the start and stop of each processing steps within the handler.

This may explain that the addresses are the same in your case.

More generally, when describbing a problem, try to state:

  1. the input you are using (data example)
  2. what you want to do (short description)
  3. how you are trying to do it (source code)
  4. the expected output that you don't get
  5. the output that you obtain instead.

This will help others to answer your questions.

share|improve this answer

Just a remark but your URL mapping:

/-100018-imagesgallery/BIG-1.jpg 

...is less logic and less RESTFUL than your filesystem target:

/imagesproduitnew/imagesgallery/BIG/100018.jpg

...because it breaks the hierarchical organization of your resources.

Besides, using the filesystem mapping would save you the hurdle of resorting to the slow RegEx library.

I am not suggesting that you are "doing it wrong", I am just indicating that there are many ways to reach your goal without having to resolve the problem created by this unintuitive URI mapping.

If you really need to invert "100018" and "imagesgallery" in the URI then you can do it much easier and faster without using RegEx.

If this URI mapping is aimed at hidding the real PATH to the resources then use something like the following URI:

/imagesproduitnew/imagesgallery/BIG/100018.jpg 

modified by the handler like this:

/imagesproduitnew/imagesgallery/BIG/957345.jpg 

The transformation can be done in-place by a very simple operation like XORing the resource name.

This is why questioning the initial goal is a good idea before trying to do something which is not necessarily the best solution.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree this is not the best idea, but this a requirement for my project, and I can't decide on it ! Unless you have a better way to do it, I won't be able to use gwan. –  gdevillepin Dec 3 '12 at 7:49
    
Given the nature of this handler (hitting all requests) I would ask the G-WAN team to help you writing an optimized version that works, making it easier for you to focus on the application itself. –  Gil Dec 4 '12 at 17:40

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