Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have test.cu file and it's compiling with NVCC

void sort()
{

thrust::host_vector<int> dat1(50);
thrust::generate(dat1.begin(),dat1.end(),rand);

for(int i=0; i<dat1.size(); i++)
{
    std::cout << dat1[i] << std::endl;
}

thrust::device_vector<int> dev_vec1 = dat1;


thrust::sort(dev_vec1.begin(),dev_vec1.end());
thrust::copy(dev_vec1.begin(),dev_vec1.end(),dat1.begin());

for(int i=0; i<dat1.size(); i++)
{
    std::cout << dat1[i] << std::endl;
}

}


#include "test.cuh"


int main()
{
   sort();
   return 0;
}

but sorting on device take 40 sec.. but when I'm run it second time it's working fast. What's problem?

share|improve this question
2  
One thing that may help on a linux system is to set the GPU in persistence mode. nvidia-smi -g 0 -pm 1 , you can get help by nvidia-smi --help. Another contributing factor may be a JIT-compile step, depending on how you are compiling your code. The first time you launch a new code that does not have the actual binary for the GPU in question, it must do a final compile step to create it. This will usually only happen once, because it is cached. You can avoid this by issuing your compile with an appropriate -arch=sm_xx switch, where xx is the compute capability of your GPU – Robert Crovella Nov 30 '12 at 14:53
    
" You can avoid this by issuing your compile with an appropriate -arch=sm_xx switch, where xx is the compute capability of your GPU" how to do it? – Alatriste Nov 30 '12 at 15:24
    
What kind of GPU do you have, and what is the nvcc compile command line you are using? – Robert Crovella Nov 30 '12 at 15:45
2  
You can get the compute capability of your gpu here or by running the deviceQuery sample. Let's say I have a GeForce GTX 560. Then my compute capability is 2.1 Now let's say my application source file is sort.cu. To compile this I would issue the command nvcc -arch=sm_21 -o sort sort.cu The -arch=sm_21 switch tells the compiler to generate code for your specific device. You can get more help here or with nvcc --help – Robert Crovella Nov 30 '12 at 16:30
3  
The initial lag is almost certainly the time required to JIT. – Jared Hoberock Nov 30 '12 at 19:15

The most probable reason is that during first run your OS is loading CUDA libraries and performing some other technical tasks before actual initialization of CUDA context. At the second run everything is already loaded and context itnitializes faster.

share|improve this answer
    
You can avoid this by issuing your compile with an appropriate -arch=sm_xx switch, where xx is the compute capability of your GPU how to do it? – Alatriste Nov 30 '12 at 15:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.