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in a simple startup script I wrote I have:

PID=`su user_name -c "daemon_name > /dev/null 2>&1 & echo \$!"`  
echo $PID  

The script is run as root. And the echo doesn't really echo anything :)

If I input the exact same command in the shell, it works:

# su user_name -c "daemon_name > /dev/null 2>&1 & echo \$!"  
11831  
#  

Any ideas? Thanks.

EDIT: It was working fine before I tried to run the application as another user.
I was previously using this code:

PID=`daemon_name > /dev/null 2>&1 & echo $!`  
echo $PID  

and it worked fine as root

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

daemons are designed to fork multiple times so likely the PID returned from $! will not be the pid you want to work with later. You will probably have to do something like this:

ps -eo pid,command,lstart --sort lstart | grep 'daemon_name' | tail -1
share|improve this answer
    
No forking in this scenario. The program I named daemon_name is in fact a java standalone application that I want to run "as a daemon". In the real case daemon_name is actually a startup.sh script that starts a java application. – mcerina Nov 30 '12 at 15:58
    
I ended up using a variation of this: ps ho pid --sort lstart -C daemon_name | tail -1 – mcerina Dec 3 '12 at 8:25

Try $$ instead of $! (current pid instead of last)

share|improve this answer
    
That's not what I want I'm afraid. Maybe I wasn't too clear in the original question. I need the pid relevant to the execution of the daemon_name program. If I try your solution, i get a pid echoed, but when then I grep the running processes I get another pid: the two pids don't match. – mcerina Nov 30 '12 at 15:55
    
Pretty sure the backticks will run and then finish before returning to your script. It sounds like you want to execute this as a sub-shell or background process. – BurnsBA Nov 30 '12 at 16:14

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