Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This question follows from catch errors within generator and continue afterwards

I have about 50 similar (but different) functions which try to extract URLs and such from websites. Because each website is different, each function is different and because websites tend to change over time this code is messy and cannot be trusted.

Here's a simplified sample, or look at the sample in the first question

def _get_units(self):
    for list1 in self.get_list1():
        for list2 in self.get_list2(list1):
            for unit in list2:
                yield unit

What I want to do with this function is essentially change the behavior to match this:

def _get_units(self):
    for list1 in self.get_list1():
        try:                 
            for list2 in self.get_list2(list1):
                try:
                    for unit in list2:
                        try:
                            yield unit
                        except Exception as e:
                            log_exception(e)
                except Exception as e:
                    log_exception(e)
        except Exception as e:
            log_exception(e)

In short, I want to turn this

for x in list:
    do_stuff(x)

to this:

for x in list:
    try:
        do_stuff(x)
    except Exception as e:
        log_exception(e)

for each for in my functions.

But I want to do it in a pythonic way. I don't want try:except blocks scattered all over the 50 functions I need to alter. Is this possible? If so, how can I do it in the most DRY way, and can I do this with the error handling in one place?

UPDATE: this question formerly included a continue statement along with the logging, but as mgilson pointed out, this isn't necessary.

UPDATE 2 with georgesl's answer the function becomes as follows:

from contextlib import contextmanager

@contextmanager
def ErrorManaged():
    try:
        yield
    except Exception as e:
        log_exception(e)


def _get_units(self):
    for list1 in self.get_list1():
        with ErrorManaged():              
            for list2 in self.get_list2(list1):
                with ErrorManaged():
                    for unit in list2:
                        with ErrorManaged():
                            yield unit

which is a lot cleaner indeed. though, a mere decorator would be even better. can anyone tell me if this is possible? if not, i'll accept georgesl's answer.

share|improve this question
    
Your innermost try-except is superfluous -- yield will not raise an exception. – Steven Rumbalski Nov 30 '12 at 15:43
    
What is the purpose of continue in your exception handling? Maybe I'm missing something, but it seems unnecessary. (note that if you can remove continue, this problem becomes much easier – mgilson Nov 30 '12 at 15:44
    
@StevenRumbalski: Since the second function will not be written but computed, i let the try:except be because it will be there regardless of the content of the loop. – ToonAlfrink Nov 30 '12 at 15:47
    
@mgilson thinking of it... how did i not notice? if i try:except the whole block, i don't need continue... editing... – ToonAlfrink Nov 30 '12 at 15:52
    
Is it possible to move some error handling into get_list1 and get_list2? – Steven Rumbalski Nov 30 '12 at 15:57

I might "decorate" the functions themselves. Presumably you have them stored in a list or something if you're living by DRY principles:

def decorate_function(func):
    def decorated(x):
        try:
            return func(x)
        except Exception as e:
            log_error(e)
    return decorated

Now you can just decorate your functions with this and it will log your errors. Note that this assumes that the continue statement above is unnecessary. It looks like it isn't really used to me, but I might be missing something.

If the functions really don't return something, then you could return True or False depending on if you hit an exception. You could use that to write your continue logic. Something like:

if not decorated_function(x): continue
share|improve this answer
    
@StevenRumbalski -- But that's not what the code snipet above will do is it? Each for encloses a single try-except. So if you catch an error, you'll hit except and then continue which just continues the current loop. – mgilson Nov 30 '12 at 15:53
    
which is what i want, but not how things are right now. Please note that the second code snippet is how i want the first code snippet to behave, it's not existing code. – ToonAlfrink Nov 30 '12 at 16:02
    
@ToonAlfrink -- I understand that. What I can't see is how your two examples relate to each other. (the two versions are the version with self... where you yield a value compared to the version where you actually call a function.) – mgilson Nov 30 '12 at 16:07

You might want to use decorators or better, the context manager :

from contextlib import contextmanager


def HandleError(func):

    def wrapped(*args, **kwargs):

        try:
            func(*args, **kwargs)
        except Exception:
            print "Bug on node #", args[0]


    return wrapped

@contextmanager
def ErrorManaged():
    try:
        yield
    except Exception:
        print "Oh noes, the loop crashed"



@HandleError
def do_something(x):
    print x
    if x==5:
        raise('Boom !')




with ErrorManaged():
    for x in range(10):
        do_something(x)
        if x == 7 :
            raise('aaaah !')
share|improve this answer
    
not that i don't know google, but could you include a link to contextmanager documentation? – ToonAlfrink Nov 30 '12 at 16:08
    
I was thinking about context managers as well, but you still end up repeating the with ... portion every time rather than decorating the functions which makes it automatic. – mgilson Nov 30 '12 at 16:09
    
you're right @mgilson, maybe I can save some space using a generator, but I didn't succeed to make it work. – lucasg Nov 30 '12 at 16:21
    
This looks good, but I'm sorry, I'm not familiar with the with statement yet. I've tried implementing this but i don't really get it. Could you please implement your answer in my function so i can see? and test? – ToonAlfrink Nov 30 '12 at 17:09
    
oh i get it now. – ToonAlfrink Nov 30 '12 at 17:40
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I gave this some more thought, the only solution to really suit my needs seems to be to modify the code itself. So here goes:

from contextlib import contextmanager
import inspect

@contextmanager
def ErrorManaged():
    try:
        yield
    except Exception as e:
        print e



def get_units():
    for x in range(-5,5):
        print(x)

        if x % 3 == 0:
            raise Exception("x nope")

        for y in range(-5,5):
            print("\t{}".format(y))

            if y % 3 == 0:
            raise Exception("y nope")

            for z in range(-5,5):
                print("\t\t{}".format(z))

                if z % 3 == 0:
                    raise Exception("z nope")


import re

def modify_get_units(get_units):    
    lines = inspect.getsourcelines(get_units)[0]
    add = "with ErrorManaged():\n"
    new = []
    tabsize = 0
    for c in lines[1]:
        if c == " ":
            tabsize += 1
        else:
            break

    count = 0
    for line in lines:
        new.append(" " * tabsize * count + line)
        m = re.match(r"^(\s+)for\s[()\w,]+\sin\s[^ :\n]+:\n$",line)
        if m:
            count += 1
            new.append(m.group(1) + " " * tabsize * count + add)

    return "".join(new)

oldfunc = inspect.getsource(get_units)
newfunc = modify_get_units(get_units)

#printing function bodies to show results

print(oldfunc)
print("\n\n\n")
print(newfunc)


#re-declare get_units
exec newfunc

#execute, but now now
#get_units()

output:

toon@ToonAlfrinkPC ~ $ python test.py
def get_units():
    for x in range(-5,5):
        print(x)

        if x % 3 == 0:
            raise Exception("x nope")

        for y in range(-5,5):
            print("\t{}".format(y))

            if y % 3 == 0:
                raise Exception("y nope")

            for z in range(-5,5):
                print("\t\t{}".format(z))

                if z % 3 == 0:
                    raise Exception("z nope")





def get_units():
    for x in range(-5,5):
        with ErrorManaged():
            print(x)

            if x % 3 == 0:
                raise Exception("x nope")

            for y in range(-5,5):
                with ErrorManaged():
                    print("\t{}".format(y))

                    if y % 3 == 0:
                        raise Exception("y nope")

                    for z in range(-5,5):
                        with ErrorManaged():
                            print("\t\t{}".format(z))

                            if z % 3 == 0:
                                raise Exception("z nope")

Thanks for helping me get there!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.