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I am trying to implement Naive Bayes Algorithm - by writing my own code in MATLAB. I was confused what distribution to choose for one of the continuous attributes. It has values as follows:

         MovieAge :
         1
         2
         3
         4
         ..
         10
         1
         11
         2
         12
         1
         3
         13
         2
         1
         4
         14
         3
         2
         5
         15
         4
         3
         6
         16
         5
         4
         ....
         32
         9
         3
         15

Please let me know which distribution to use for such data? and in my test set, this attribute will contain values (some times) that are not included in training data. how to handle this problem? Thanks 15

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Do the values ever go below one? Is there a limit on the largest value? Are the values always positive integers? –  qdjm Nov 30 '12 at 15:47
    
No , its the movie age, so values never go below one. the max limit is the number of weeks that a movie lived. max(MovieAge)=max(Movie1Age,Movie2Age,Movie3Age...) , my data set contains 49 movies. and the max Movie Age is 306. but if i change my data set by includign or excluding some movies, it will change. –  Basmah Nov 30 '12 at 15:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Assuming this variable takes integer values, rather than being continuous (based on the example), the simplest method is a histogram-type approach: the probability of some value is the fraction of times it occurs in the training data. Consider a final bin for all values above some number (maybe 20 or so based on your example). If you have problems with zero counts, add one to all of them (can be seen as a Dirichlet prior if you're that way inclined).

As for a parametric form, if you prefer one, the Poisson distribution is a possibility. A qq plot, or even a goodness of fit test, will suggest how appropriate this is in your case, but I suspect you're going to be better with the histogram based method.

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Dear Ben, thank you very much for help. I am not sure if i know how to use Histogram method. would you please guide me to some good resource where i can study about it. thanks :) –  Basmah Nov 30 '12 at 16:14
    
The histogram method is to simply count the number of times each value occurs in your data, and use that (divided by the total number of counts) as its estimated probability. This has two potential problems: 1) you've never seen some values, so you estimate them to have 0 probability (overcome by adding one to all counts) 2) you need a maximum value (can be overcome by making the final 'bin' >20) –  Ben Allison Dec 4 '12 at 13:26

Like @Ben's answer, starting with Histogram sounds good.

I take your input, and the histogram looks like below:

enter image description here

Save your data into a text file called histdata, one line per value:

Python code used to generate the plot:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
data = []
for line in file('./histdata'):
    data.append(int(line))

plt.hist(data, bins=10)
plt.xlabel('Movie Age')
plt.ylabel('Counts')
plt.show()
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