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I have the following markup containing 10 pre elements with the class indent:

​<pre class="indent"></pre>
<pre class="indent"></pre>
<pre class="indent"></pre>
<pre class="indent"></pre>
<pre class="indent"></pre>
<pre class="indent"></pre>
<pre class="indent"></pre>
<pre class="indent"></pre>
<pre class="indent"></pre>
<pre class="indent"></pre>​

I'm using the following jQuery .each() function to iterate through each element:

​$(function(){    
    $.each(".indent", function(index){
       alert(index); 
    });    
});​

I would expect to see 10 alerts, however I only see 7

-- See Fiddle --


However, this works as expected with $(".indent").each():

$(function(){    
    $(".indent").each(function(index){
       alert(index); 
    });    
});​

-- See Fiddle --


Looking at the $.each() documentation, I understand theres a difference:

The $.each() function is not the same as $(selector).each(), which is used to iterate, exclusively, over a jQuery object.

But I don't understand why in this instance, it doesn't iterate through all elements.

Why is this happening?

share|improve this question
18  
Use console.log instead of alert, you'll get better data for debugging. –  zzzzBov Nov 30 '12 at 15:52
10  
$.each(".indent") doesn't interate over .indent objects. It interates on ".indent" string. –  Maurício Giordano Nov 30 '12 at 15:53
2  
just a side note: better use console.log instead of alert. much better for testing, it is a pain to close all those popups. –  luschn Nov 30 '12 at 15:54
1  
@luschn Thanks, earlier versions did use console.log(), but after hours of head scratching, and double-guessing, every bit of code had to be changed in case :P –  Curt Nov 30 '12 at 15:56
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3 Answers 3

up vote 137 down vote accepted
$.each(".indent", function(index){

doesn't iterate over the elements of $('.indent') but over the ".indent" string whose length is 7 chars.

See reference


A more detailed explanation based on jQuery source code :

jQuery first checks if the first parameter, obj (here your string), has a length :

var ...
        length = obj.length,
        isObj = length === undefined || jQuery.isFunction( obj );

Your string having a length (and not being a function), isObj is false.

In this case, the following code is executed :

for ( ; i < length; ) {
    if ( callback.call( obj[ i ], i, obj[ i++ ] ) === false ) {
        break;
    }
}

So, given the function f, the following code

$.each(".indent", f);

is equivalent to

for (var i=0; i<".indent".length; i++) {
    var letter = ".indent"[i];
    f.call(letter, i, letter);
}

(you can log the letters using var f = function(i,v){console.log(v)}; or be reminded one of the subtleties of call using var f = function(){console.log(this)};)

share|improve this answer
    
wow. 9 upvotes in under 60 seconds. –  xdumaine Nov 30 '12 at 15:53
9  
Holy rep-cap batman! –  zzzzBov Nov 30 '12 at 15:54
1  
I've seen 9 upvotes for a JS addition function in under a minute, but 17 for an .each()... have to upvote just for fun :) –  Zoltan Toth Nov 30 '12 at 15:56
3  
+1 Thanks! I never would've worked that out! –  Curt Nov 30 '12 at 15:57
2  
Thank you so much. I also had this kind of issue recently. –  Nylo Andy Nov 30 '12 at 16:10
show 1 more comment

You are iterating through the string, you should pass an object or an array to $.each method:

$(function(){    
    $.each($(".indent"), function(index){
       alert(index);
    });    
});
share|improve this answer
add comment

$.each iterates over a collection of data. Since you pass a String that have 7 chars, it will iterate for each char. See the example of use:

$.each([52, 97], function(index, value) { 
  alert(index + ': ' + value); 
});
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for pointing out the value argument... I have no idea why JQuery decided to reverse the two, generally you want value more often than index –  Izkata Nov 30 '12 at 16:23
3  
@Izkata for the value you usually use this (well, not always). That's why index is the most useful parameter and so the first one. –  dystroy Nov 30 '12 at 17:30
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