Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

According to W3C standards, if you have a nillable element with a nil value, you are supposed to format it like this:

<myNillableElement xsi:nil="true" />

But if you use this LinqToXml statement...

element.Add(
    new XElement(ns + "myNillableElement", null);

...the resulting XML is...

<myNillableElement />

...which is invalid. And not just invalid according to W3C, invalid according to Microsoft's own XML/XSD validator. So, next time you validate your XML, you get errors.

Am I missing some switch that can turn on correct handling of nillable elements?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

LINQ to XML is mostly not schema-aware - it lets you validate the tree, but it doesn't derive any particular semantics from that. Your mistake is believing that null should somehow always map to xsi:nil. There's no such requirement in W3C specs (rather obviously, because they do not cover any kinds of language bindings).

In particular, XElement constructor that you call actually takes an argument of type object[], which is a list of children - there's no reason why passing null to that should have any relevance to xsi:nil. In any case, how is LINQ to XML supposed to know that you're producing XML that is valid according to some schema, and that one particular element in this schema has nilled="true"?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer...I think I'll edit the title of the post because you've convinced me that what I've observed is not really incorrect behavior. It would be nice, though, if there were a schema-aware set of classes for LinqToXml. –  devuxer Sep 1 '09 at 23:24
add comment

You could also do something like this, taking advantage of the null coalescing operator:

public static object Nil
{
    get
    {
        // **I took a guess at the syntax here - you should double check.**
        return new XAttribute(Xsi + "nil", true);
    }
}

// ......

object nullableContent = ...;
element.Add(
    new XElement(NS + "myNillableElement", nullableContent ?? Nil)
    );
share|improve this answer
    
Very slick! I hadn't come across ?? before. I think the extension methods are still needed to handle SetElementValue, though, since the attribute will either need to be added, removed, or left as is. –  devuxer Sep 1 '09 at 23:15
add comment

Hopefully, this is not the ideal answer, but I wrote a couple extension methods to at least make it a little easier to deal with nillable elements in LinqToXml.

Extension Methods:

public static class XElementExtensions
{
    private static XName _nillableAttributeName = "{http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance}nil";

    public static void SetNillableElementValue(this XElement parentElement, XName elementName, object value)
    {
        parentElement.SetElementValue(elementName, value);
        parentElement.Element(elementName).MakeNillable();
    }

    public static XElement MakeNillable(this XElement element)
    {
        var hasNillableAttribute = element.Attribute(_nillableAttributeName) != null;
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(element.Value))
        {
            if (!hasNillableAttribute)
                element.Add(new XAttribute(_nillableAttributeName, true));
        }
        else
        {
            if (hasNillableAttribute)
                element.Attribute(_nillableAttributeName).Remove();
        }
        return element;
    }
}

Example Usage

// "nil" attribute will be added
element.Add(
    new XElement(NS + "myNillableElement", null)
    .MakeNillable();

// no attribute will be added
element.Add(
    new XElement(NS + "myNillableElement", "non-null string")
    .MakeNillable();

// "nil" attribute will be added (if not already present)
element.SetNillableElementValue(NS + "myNillableElement", null);

// no attribute will be added (and will be removed if necessary)
element.SetNillableElementValue(NS + "myNillableElement", "non-null string");
share|improve this answer
    
This will treat blank strings as null, which may not be desirable. I.e. both new XElement("Name", null) and new XElement("Name", "") will be marked as nil. –  Matt Mitchell Apr 15 at 6:52
    
@MattMitchell, interesting point, but I think I coded it that way because it's simply not possible to represent a null element value using an XElement. Even if you do new XElement(name, null), the Value property will be string.Empty, not null. So, for strings, you do lose the ability to distinguish nulls from empties, but at least value types (like int) work as you would expect. If you can think of a workaround for strings, please let me know. –  devuxer Apr 15 at 18:07
    
Well for the case of .SetNillableElementValue you could check if the value provided is null, and if so add the nillable attribute. As you've said, there's no way after the fact (e.g. in the MakeNillable case) to determine if the source value was null. –  Matt Mitchell Apr 16 at 8:22
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.