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I was curious about doing this in C++:

Lets say I have a small library that I distribute to my users. I give my clients both the binary and the associated header files that they need. For example, lets assume the following header is used in development:

#include <string>

ClassA 
{
    public:
        bool setString(const std::string & str);

    private:
        std::string str;
};

Now for my question. For deployment, is there anything fundamentally wrong with me giving a 'reduced' header to my clients? For example, could I strip off the private section and simply give them this:

#include <string>

ClassA 
{
    public:
        bool setString(const std::string & str);
};

My gut instinct says "yes, this is possible, but there are gotchas", so that is why I am asking this question here. If this is possible and also safe, it looks like a great way to hide private variables, and thus even avoid forward declaration in some cases.

I am aware that the symbols will still be there in the binary itself, and that this is just a visibility thing at the source code level.

Thanks!

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No - that won't work - the size of ClassA will be wrong for one thing. –  Paul R Nov 30 '12 at 17:06
    
This violates C++'s one definition rule and will not work. –  Captain Obvlious Nov 30 '12 at 17:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Modifying a class declaration this way will cause incompatible code.

The compiler needs the class declaration to figure out how much space an instance of that class takes and where in that space which member variables are located.

If you leave out members (even private ones) in one header, code compiled with this header will assume a different layout of the class. It will allocate less space for instances of the class and will assume the member variables are in incorrect places.

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I was worried about this. Thanks for the answer! –  Ben Nov 30 '12 at 17:24

Qt (a set of cross platform C++ libraries) uses a technique of hiding implementation details using private headers and "d" pointers. I think it is pretty slick for maintaining a library with binary compatibility for a long time but being able to change the implementation when necessary.

http://zchydem.enume.net/2010/01/19/qt-howto-private-classes-and-d-pointers/

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In addition to what sth said in his answer I will add that if you have a reason to do something like this, then why not simply make ClassA an "interface" type class, that has only pure virtual functions.

Your internal code would then have a ClassB which derives from ClassA and implements all those pure virtual functions. You distribute the header for ClassA only. Obviously the user cannot declare ClassA objects on the stack, since ClassA is a pure virtual class and cannot directly create ClassB objects on the stack or heap since he knows nothing about ClassB.

Public Header File (distribute this to the user):

class A 
{
public:
   virtual ~A()
   { // necessary - don't remove.
   }

   virtual somefunc() = 0;
   virtual someotherfunc(int a, int b) = 0;
   virtual bool setString(const std::string & str) = 0;
};

// This function creates an instance of object B. You must
// call delete on the returned pointer when you're done with it!
A *CreateObjectB();

Private Header File:

class B : public class A
{
private:
    ...

public:
   B();
   virtual ~B();

   virtual somefunc();
   virtual someotherfunc(int a, int b);
   virtual bool setString(const std::string & str);
};

Private Source File:

classB::B()
{

}

classB::~B()
{

}

classB::somefunc()
{
    ...
}

classB::someotherfunc(int a, int b)
{
    ...
}

classB::setString(const std::string & str)
{
    ...
}

A *CreateObjectB()
{
    return new B();
}
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Another common way to hide implementation details would be the pimpl idiom ("pointer-to-implementation"). –  sth Nov 30 '12 at 17:29
    
That's true; I like this "interface" methodology better personally, but sometimes pimpl makes more sense. –  Nik Bougalis Nov 30 '12 at 17:30
    
Synxis: thanks for catching that. Silly typo. –  Nik Bougalis Nov 30 '12 at 18:37

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