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I have a synchronicity problem. I have searched and cannot find a question with the same conditions as mine. Pointers are welcome.

Android 4.1.2 on Eclipse 4.2.1

I have two activities; let's call them ListActivity and DetailActivity. On a button press on ListActivity, I start DetailActivity. When the user makes changes to data in the DetailActivity and then clicks the back button, I want to do two things. First, I want to save changes to the database if a dirty flag is true. Second, I want to return an Intent to the onActivityResult() method of the ListActivity.

The problem is one of timing. Since I want to do database updating, I read that it is best practices to do this in the onStop() method of the DetailActivity. Right after I update the database I set up the Intent and call the setReult() method in the DetailActivity.

_resultIntent = new Intent();  
_resultIntent.putExtra(ListActivity .DETAIL_RESULT, _currentData);  
Log.d("ListActivity.setUpReturn()", "checkpoint");  
setResult(Activity.RESULT_OK, _resultIntent);  

The onActivityResult() method of the ListActivity is called before I have a chance to set the result. I placed Log calls throughout and what appears to happen is the following:

1) The user is in the DetailActivity and changes some data setting the dirty flag to true.
2) The user clicks the system back button.
3) The DetailActivity disappears from the screen.
4) The ListActivity re-appears.
5) The Log notes the onActivityResult(), onRestart(), onStart(), and onResume() methods of ListActivity execute in that order
6) Some other stuff is logged.
7) The Log FINALLY notes that the onStop() method of the DetailActiviy executes.

This means that by the time I am updating the database and setting up the result Intent, the calling activity has already gone past the point of using it.

I'd rather not constantly update the database. I'd rather put this into the onStop() method like the best practices says, but I don't know how to get around the issue of timing. Any suggestions? Am I doing something obviously wrong?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would rather rely on event based code logic rather than on probability. You could try the following.

*1) The user is in the DetailActivity and changes some data setting the dirty flag to true. 2) The user clicks the system back button.*

Override the onBackPressed method and perform your database operation right there and once the DB operation is performed you can call the super.onBackPressed() method and let the Android Activity stack take over. Mind you DB operation could be time consuming and hence it is also recommended to use AsyncTask with callback and only then call finish().

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PravinCG, This is exactly the answer I was looking for. This lets me complete the database work before the system even knows the user wants to dismiss this activity. As a side benefit, it only happens when the user clicks the back button and not when the activity is stopped. This means if the user changes orientation or gets a phone call and the activity is stopped or even destroyed, the state can be managed throught the normal means, but the changes will only be committed to the database when the user expressly dissmisses the activity. -Continued –  Dogulas Nov 30 '12 at 20:47
    
Continued- @Override public void onBackPressed() { Log.d("DetailActivity.onBackPressed()", "checkpoint"); if (_currentDataIsDirty) { DoDatabaseWork(_currentData); } _resultIntent = new Intent(); _resultIntent.putExtra(ListActivity .DETAIL_RESULT, _currentData); setResult(Activity.RESULT_OK, _resultIntent); super.onBackPressed(); } I'm going to keep this as my pattern for returning from a child activity to a parent activity when the child needs to do heavy tasks. Thanks again. –  Dogulas Nov 30 '12 at 20:48
    
@Dogulas: Glad that this helped. As with case with stackoverflow, you should accept this as answer. –  PravinCG Dec 1 '12 at 3:15

Check that did you make you activity as a SingleInstance if yes then make it to SingleTop

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Ali Imran, Thank you for your response. I just let the wizard create the activities and the manifest file, by default does not include the launch mode. This means it defaults to "standard". This doesn't seem to be the problem in my case. The fix seems to be the one suggested by PravinCG. Thanks again for your reply. Dogulas –  Dogulas Nov 30 '12 at 20:45

That's because onPause() is called right after the activity loses focus. The onStop() however is called when the activity is going to be destroyd (usually when there is not enough memory). So put your code into the onPause() method and you should be fine...

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Tomas, Thanks for your response. Yes, I had thought about putting the clean-up stuff in onPause() but the documentation discourages it: developer.android.com/training/basics/activity-lifecycle/… "Although the onPause() method is called before onStop(), you should use onStop() to perform larger, more CPU intensive shut-down operations, such as writing information to a database." -Continued –  Dogulas Nov 30 '12 at 20:46
    
-Continued This is why I went with onStop(). I had also considered onDestroy() but I'll bet my current problem would be worse. Also, onPause() occurs more frequently (OK, maybe just a little bit more frequently) than onStop(). It will be called when the activity is partially obscured. I really don't want to do all the database work more frequently than I have to. All this being said, your solution will work. Dogulas –  Dogulas Nov 30 '12 at 20:46
    
@Dogulas You're right. onPause() should contain only fast code so a user don't have to wait for the response too long. On the other hand, this is the only method which is called for sure. So it's not really an easy choice :) –  Tomas Nov 30 '12 at 22:29

It turns out the best solution for me was from PravinCG. I will use this as a pattern in the future.

@Override
public void onBackPressed() {
    Log.d("DetailActivity.onBackPressed()", "checkpoint");
    if (_currentDataIsDirty) {
        DoDatabaseWork(_currentData);
    }
    _resultIntent = new Intent();
    _resultIntent.putExtra(ListActivity .DETAIL_RESULT, _currentData);
    setResult(Activity.RESULT_OK, _resultIntent);
    super.onBackPressed();
}

Dogulas

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