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I am writing a toolbox for (PO)MDPs and am seeing a bad pattern emerge. Especially when implementing reinforcement learning algorithms I tend to repeat myself. See the following pseudo-algorithm:

arguments: epsilon

v <- initial V values
c <- initial C values

while not good-enough
   delta <- 0.0
   if in-place
        v_old <- copy(v)
    else
        v_old <- reference to v
    for s in ss
        a = some_value(s,old_v)
        old_v <- v_old[s]
        v[s] = c*a*v_old[s]
        delta = max(delta,old_v-v[s])
    if delta < epsilon
        good-enough <- true

return v

Now see this nearly identical algorithm:

arguments: epsilon,gamma

v <- initial V values
c <- initial C values

while not good-enough
    delta <- 0.0
    if in-place
        v_old <- copy(v)
    else
        v_old <- reference to v
    for s in ss
        a,o = get_a_and_o(s)
        old_v <- v_old[s]
        v[s] = c*v_old[s]*exp(o-a)
        delta = max(delta,old_v-v[s])
    if delta < epsilon(/1-gamma)
        good-enough <- true

return v

There are some simple differences between these algorithms, but I am repeating myself quite a bit. Now my question is: how do you abstract away the common parts between these two example algorithms (applicable to real algorithms)?

I have looked at one approach (in python), where you give the algorithm a pre, a post and a loop function which are called before, after and for each iteration respectively and passed an algorithm state dictionary to hold variables. But this approach did not seem very nice. Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
I think using DRY in algorithms is tough, as all are different in their approaches. –  Narendra Pathai Nov 30 '12 at 18:09
    
You could always reuse some algorithm at some other places applicable. –  Narendra Pathai Nov 30 '12 at 18:10
    
For the most part you should be concerned more about the efficiency of the algorithm and less about DRY in this case. –  Narendra Pathai Nov 30 '12 at 18:15

3 Answers 3

The object-oriented approach would be to make a base class that contains the common parts of the algorithm but not the application-specific parts (i.e. the pre, post, or loop functions). Instead it just has calls to virtual methods that it doesn't implement itself.

Then when you want to instantiate an actual use case, you'd create a subclass of that base class that contains only the implementations of the virtual methods that the base class's code needs to call down to.

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Obviously, the 2 algorithms have a lot in common: the overall workflow/steps are virtually the same, the only difference is the specifics of what is happening in the steps. This is one place where functional approaches shine: you want to replace specific functions / evaluations while keeping the overall structure intact.

Without going into details, looking at your code, you can see that:

  1. they use the same input V
  2. at each iteration, using V and some parameters, an updated value of V is produced
  3. at each iteration, using old and new V, and some parameters, a condition is evaluated - is the new V good enough, or should the algorithm continue?

Here is a sketch on how you could approach it to avoid duplication:

You can rephrase 2. as "at each iteration, we'll apply a function to the current value of V, which will return an updated value V' " - and obviously, that function has signature Updater: fun 't -> 't (the Updater function takes in an input of type t, and returns an output of same type).

Similarly, step 3 can be stated as "at each step, we'll apply a function to the pair (V, V'), which will tell us if yes or no this is good enough" - and this function needs a signature like Finished: fun ('t * 't) -> bool. (Given a tuple of two items of type 't, evaluate and give me a true/false answer).

You can now extract out the specifics of the Updater and Finished functions, and pass them as arguments to the main algorithm (let's call the loop Search), along these lines:

let Search (Updater: fun 't -> 't) 
           (Finished: fun ('t * 't) -> bool) 
           currentV: 't =
    v' = v
    while not Finished (v, v')
        v' <- Updater v
    return v    

(Example above is actually not quite right, but conveys the spirit. You would typically write this as a recursion in a functional style, which would look like that:

let rec Search (Updater: fun 't -> 't) 
               (Finished: fun ('t * 't) -> bool) 
               currentV: 't =
    if Finished (v, v') 
        then return v'
    else
        Search Updater Finished v'

Now instead of having to rewrite the overall loop, you can define specific functions you want to apply for the update step and finish step, and your code duplication is gone - the overall loop/structure remains unchanged, and you just write functions that are completely specific to the problem at hand.

I did lots of hand-waving here, hopefully this helps. If you are interested, I can provide a code sample in F# or C# illustrating the idea on working code.

share|improve this answer
    
But what if Updater can be :: v -> r -> v or sometimes :: v -> r -> e -> (v,t) or sometimes just :: v? That is exactly my problem, I do understand that the algorithm does some update at some point and that I can just pass in functions, but the question is how to handle the question of: "what arguments to give which function"? –  o1iver Dec 10 '12 at 10:33
    
Define the signature around the state that is needed to iterate - that is, the input and output of an iteration. Anything else should be either computed locally inside your loop, or passed in via closure. You can always extend your state by including more variables (assuming your language supports generics). –  Mathias Dec 10 '12 at 18:07
    
Alright, so that is the approach I also first thought of. You would agree that using a State Monad would be the most generic approach to this right? –  o1iver Dec 11 '12 at 13:35

Use first-class functions: Encapsulate the different argument types in another class (an array, tuple, etc.) and pass a function called, perhaps, calculateDeltaFunction to your function and then call it, i.e.,

def oneDeltaWay(s, myAlgorithmArgs) : 
  ...first example...

def anotherDeltaWay(s, myAlgorithmArgs) : 
  ...second example...

def commonStructure(calculateDeltaFunction, functionSpecificArgs) :
  ... common code ...  
  for s in ss
    delta = calculateDeltaFunction(s, functionSpecificArgs)
    if delta < epsilon(/1-gamma)
       good-enough <- true
  ...etc...

commonStructure(oneDeltaWay, firstTypeOfArgs)
commonStructure(anotherDeltaWay, secondTypeOfArgs)
share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, that's essentially the functional approach I outline in my answer. –  Mathias Nov 30 '12 at 20:19
    
But how does the for loop know which arguments to pass to calculateDeltaFunction? Is function specific args a list of strings that specifies requierd args from in scope variables? –  o1iver Dec 10 '12 at 10:34
    
Well, your original code does not show where the ss come from, but it sounds like they are context-dependent, in which case, yes, you pass them in as arguments. In other words, your commonStructure function should be the, well, common structure, and whatever aspects of it are context-dependent should be passed in as arguments by the calling function which knows which specific strategy and which specific arguments are needed. –  Larry OBrien Dec 10 '12 at 18:04

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