Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

let's say I have a JavaScript object of this form:

var myJsObject = 
{
    A.b: 1
    A.c: 2
}

How do I get the value of let's say A.c?

I tried:

var value = myJsObject['A.c']

But that gave me the error Uncaught TypeError: Cannot set property 'A.c' of undefined

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
You should post an actual example. The error you're showing doesn't match the error you should get given your example. –  I Hate Lazy Nov 30 '12 at 18:13
1  
What you have here is not valid javascript as A.b cannot be a property name without at least putting quotes around it. –  jfriend00 Nov 30 '12 at 18:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You don't need the "Object" keyword and should quote the properties. This worked in my console:

var myJsObject = { 'A.b': 1, 'A.c': 2 };
var value = myJsObject['A.c'];
console.log(value); // 2
share|improve this answer
    
I know, that was a typo, but I still have the same problem –  user765368 Nov 30 '12 at 18:05
    
Did you quote the 'A.b' and 'A.c' properties like in my example? –  gpojd Nov 30 '12 at 18:06
    
@gpojd - you are missing a comma betweenn your properties –  bPratik Nov 30 '12 at 18:07
    
Yeah, I think the comma and the quotes were the problems, now it works, thank you –  user765368 Nov 30 '12 at 18:12
    
@bPratik, that was a copy error from the original question. I fixed it when I tested in my console. I wouldn't have noticed... –  gpojd Nov 30 '12 at 18:14

The code

var myJsObject = 
{
    A.b: 1
}

produces a syntax error, because periods must be quoted, because they have special meaning in the language. The JavaScript interpreter read A.b as an attempt to get the b property from the A object, but it expects an identifier name, instead of an operation. Consider a similar example:

var myJsObject = 
{
    foo-bar: 1
}

Here, the hyphen is read a subtraction operator, and produces a syntax error also.

Instead, use a quoted property name:

var myJsObject = 
{
    "A.b": 1,
    "A.c": 2
}

(Also, your code is missing a comma after the "A.b": 1 line which I added in as well.)

share|improve this answer

You can't chain dot notations. This should be working:

var myJsObject = {
    A: {
      b: 1,
      c: 2
    }
}

Or if you want to have a property name like A.b, it needs to be quoted, if the name contains special characters:

var myJsObject = 
{
    'A b': 1,
    'A.c': 2
}
share|improve this answer
1  
yes you can't chain them, but OP using myJsObject['A.c'] is still valid. –  bPratik Nov 30 '12 at 18:10
    
@bPratik Yes, I agree, but I was not sure, if OP wanted to create multiple properties for A, or just use properties named A.b and A.c. –  Teemu Nov 30 '12 at 18:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.