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Suppose I have a list of names. I want to be able to add these as instance functions to a class instance dynamically. I know about types.MethodType but I am a bit of a novice in getting from there to here. Essentially what I want to do is:

class foo( object ):
     def __init__(self):
         pass

f = foo()
names = ["a","b","c"]
for name in names:
    add name() to f  # not sure what to do here
    # what I wanted added to instance "f" is this for each name:
    def name(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print( "My name is %s" % inspect.stack()[0][3]   )       
        print( "__called, args=%r, **kwargs=%r" % (args, kwargs) )

f.a() # ==> calls f.a()
f.b(1,2,3) # calls f.b(1,2,3 )and so on
share|improve this question
1  
Why would you want to do this? Why not just build a class to handle names? If you really insist on doing this you might try creating an empty dictionary/list and then appending values dynamically like that (rather than trying to dynamically grow your class methods). Can you provide the pragmatics for this - the context may provide some insight on possible solutions (or alternative techniques)? –  Justin Carroll Nov 30 '12 at 18:19
1  
This looks like a solution in search of a problem. What problem are you trying to solve? –  Burhan Khalid Nov 30 '12 at 18:20
    
@burhan, nascent: short story is that I want to read a file in of parameter names from a file. Using these names, I want the users of my class to be able to do something like "val=f.parameter()". yes, yes, I could build a dict and have them do f.parms["name"], etc. but due to some perceived value on the customer's part, the f.parameter() idiom is what is wanted. Sometime users ask for things that don't always make the most sense - ever seen a pink Cadillac driving around? –  staggart Nov 30 '12 at 18:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you create your functions as nested functions it's easier; name is then a variable taken from the nested scope:

import types
def buildMethod(name, instance):
    def namefunc(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print "My name is %s" % name
        print "__called, args=%r, **kwargs=%r" % (args, kwargs)
    namefunc.__name__ = name
    setattr(instance, name, types.MethodType(namefunc, instance, type(instance)))

f = foo()
names = ["a","b","c"]
for name in names:
    buildMethod(name, f)

This results in:

>>> f.a
<bound method instance.a of <__main__.foo instance at 0x100d8e560>>
>>> f.a.__name__
'a'
>>> f.a()
My name is a
__called, args=(), **kwargs={}
>>> f.b()
My name is b
__called, args=(), **kwargs={}
>>> f.c()
My name is c
__called, args=(), **kwargs={}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, I had been working on something very similar but was getting hung up on trying to get inspect.stack()[0][3] to return the name. –  Andrew Clark Nov 30 '12 at 18:28
    
@F.J. -- Me too. I had decided that I needed a closure to get the name in there, I just hadn't thought of pulling the whole thing into another function to actually get the closing scope right. –  mgilson Nov 30 '12 at 18:30
    
Is __name__ preferred to func_name, or is it a tomato/Tomato issue? –  mgilson Nov 30 '12 at 18:32
1  
@mgilson: __name__ is preferred, it's universal (try it on a built-in function, for example). –  Martijn Pieters Nov 30 '12 at 18:34
    
@Martijin - you have answered a bunch of my questions recently - thanks and you really know this stuff well!! –  staggart Nov 30 '12 at 18:41

I was wrong about setattr alone being sufficient. This works, though:

import inspect
import types

class foo( object ):
     def __init__(self):
         pass

def namefunc(self, *args, **kwargs):
    print( "My name is %s" % inspect.stack()[0][3]   )       
    print( "__called, args=%r, **kwargs=%r" % (args, kwargs) )

f = foo()
names = ["a","b","c"]
for name in names:
    setattr(f, name, types.MethodType(namefunc, f))

f.a() # ==> calls f.a()
f.b(1,2,3) # calls f.b(1,2,3 )and so on
share|improve this answer
2  
The OP is missing a lot more than that. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 30 '12 at 18:17
    
That won't get the function's name correct. –  mgilson Nov 30 '12 at 18:18
    
how does that add the actual code for the newly added function? I need to auto-generate the CODE for the new function too - remember the new function has no code behind it yet... –  staggart Nov 30 '12 at 18:19
    
@staggart You kind of left that part out of the original question. :-) –  Kirk Strauser Nov 30 '12 at 18:23
    
But all functions will have name namefunc –  applicative_functor Nov 30 '12 at 18:27

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