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I'm currently trying to learn C++. In learning, I like to try weird things to get a grasp of the language and how memory works. Right now, I'm trying to create a class who has an array of characters that is set on construction. The only method of my class is to be able to get the array via a pointer on an argument. I've successfully created my class and it works just fine, but now I want to make it more secure by making sure that I never change the value of the array.

This is what I have so far:

#import <stdio.h>

class MyClass {
    public:
        char const * myArray;
        MyClass(char inputChar[]){
            myArray = inputChar;
        }

        void get(const char * retVal[]){
            *retVal = myArray;
        }
};

int main(){
    char myString[] = {'H','E','L','L','O'};
    MyClass somethingNew = MyClass(myString);
    const char * other = new char[4];
    somethingNew.get(&other);
    std::cout << other[0];
    return 0;
}

I noticed that I cannot change the value of the array at all by using the dereference operator:

myArray[0] = 'h';

And this is good, but that doesn't mean that I cannot change the pointer of where myArray[0] points to:

*(&myArray) = new char('h');

Is there any way to prevent against this?

--- Resolution ---

#import <stdio.h>

typedef const char * const constptr;

class MyClass {
    public:
        constptr * myArray;
        MyClass(constptr inputChar) {
            myArray = &inputChar;
        }

        void get(constptr * retVal){
            retVal = myArray;
        }
};

int main(){
    char myString[] = "Hello";
    MyClass somethingNew(myString);
    constptr other = new char[4];
    somethingNew.get(&other);
    std::cout << other[0];
    return 0;
}

This means that I cannot do any of the following:

*myArray[0] = 'h';
*myArray = new char[4];
*&*myArray = new char('h');

But I can do this:

myArray = &inputChar;
share|improve this question
1  
Don't do this: MyClass somethingNew = MyClass(myString); Do this: MyClass somethingNew(myString); –  Rob K Nov 30 '12 at 19:15
    
@RobK What's the difference? Is there a legitimate reason I should use your syntax over mine, or is it syntactical sugar? –  Kyle Nov 30 '12 at 19:30
1  
@Kyle: The way you are doing it, you are creating 2 objects, one of which is destroyed at the end of the statement. First you are creating an unnamed object, then you are copying it to the named object somethingNew, then the unnamed object is destroyed. Granted, the compiler will probably just optimize that away, but why would you give it the option? Rob K's version just creates one object. –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 30 '12 at 22:16
    
@BenjaminLindley Ah, thanks! –  Kyle Nov 30 '12 at 22:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, you have to create a const pointer to a const object like this:

char const * const myArray;

The first const as you know, keeps you from modifying what the pointer points to; the second const keeps you from re-assigning something else to the pointer.

You might also consider using a const reference, which is pretty much the same.

EDIT:

As Benjamin Lindley points out, since the pointer is now constant, you need to assing a value to it in the intialization list, not the constructor body, like this:

   MyClass(char inputChar[])
   : myArray(inputChar) {
    }
share|improve this answer
3  
Also note that he will need to initialize the pointer in the constructor's initialization list. He cannot do it in the body the way he is doing it now. –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 30 '12 at 18:53
    
@BenjaminLindley, true that, I will edit, thank you –  imreal Nov 30 '12 at 18:57
    
This works great, but what if I wanted to change where myArray points to later? I don't care so much if the pointer myArray changes, but more so that where the pointed to object is not changed. I'm thinking I would have to have a pointer that points to a pointer that is constant ... any ideas? –  Kyle Nov 30 '12 at 19:27
1  
Mmm, I think I might, so you want a pointer to a constant pointer with constant value. It is kind of a problem, because if you do this: char * const * const myArray, that would be a const pointer to a const pointer and you can't solve it with parentheses, so the C syntax doesn't allow it in a single declaration, you can however do a typedef. typedef const char*const constptr; constptr * myArray; Is that what you meant? –  imreal Nov 30 '12 at 20:12
1  
@Nick That is perfect! Thank you! –  Kyle Nov 30 '12 at 22:37

You need to create a const pointer like so:

char const * const myArray;

That is a const pointer to a const char.

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