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I have a Rails app running at Heroku, where I'm trying to calculate the rank (position) of a user to a highscore list.

The app is a place for the users to bet each other and the can start the wager (be creating a CHOICE) or they can bet against an already created Choice (by making a BET).

I have the following SQL which should give me an array of users based on their total winnings on both Choices and Bets.. But it's giving me some wrong total winning and I think the problem is in the Left Joins because if I rewrite the SQL to only contain either the Choice or the Bet table then I works just fine..

Anyone with any pointers on how to rewrite the SQL to work correctly :)

SELECT users.id, sum(COALESCE(bets.profitloss, 0) + COALESCE(choices.profitloss, 0)) as total_pl
FROM users
LEFT JOIN bets ON bets.user_id = users.id
LEFT JOIN choices ON choices.user_id = users.id
GROUP BY users.id
ORDER BY total_pl DESC

Result:

+---------------+
| id | total_pl |
+---------------+
|  1 |      830 |
|  4 |      200 |
|  3 |      130 |
|  7 |     -220 |
|  5 |    -1360 |
|  6 |    -4950 |
+---------------+

Below are the two SQL string where I only join to one table and the two results from that.. see that the sum of the below do not match the above result.. The below are the correct sum.

SELECT users.id, sum(COALESCE(bets.profitloss, 0)) as total_pl 
FROM users 
LEFT JOIN bets ON bets.user_id = users.id 
GROUP BY users.id 
ORDER BY total_pl DESC

SELECT users.id, sum(COALESCE(choices.profitloss, 0)) as total_pl 
FROM users 
LEFT JOIN choices ON choices.user_id = users.id 
GROUP BY users.id 
ORDER BY total_pl DESC

+---------------+
| id | total_pl | 
+---------------+
|  3 |      170 |
|  1 |      150 |
|  4 |      100 |
|  5 |       80 |
|  7 |       20 |
|  6 |      -30 |
+---------------+

+---------------+
| id | total_pl |
+---------------+
|  1 |       20 |
|  4 |        0 |
|  3 |      -10 |
|  7 |      -30 |
|  5 |     -110 |
|  6 |     -360 |
+---------------+
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is happening because of the relationship between the two LEFT JOINed tables - that is, if there are (multiple) rows in both bets and choices, the total number of rows seen is multiplied from the individual row counts, not the addition.
If you have

choices
id   profitloss
================
1    20
1    30

bets
id   profitloss
================
1    25
1    35

The result of the join is actually:

bets/choices
id   bets.profitloss   choices.profitloss
1    20                25
1    20                35
1    30                25
1    30                35

(see where this is going?)

Fixing this is actually fairly simple. You haven't specified an RDBMS, but this should work on any of them (or with minor tweaks).

SELECT users.id, COALESCE(bets.profitloss, 0) 
                     + COALESCE(choices.profitloss, 0) as total_pl
FROM users
LEFT JOIN (SELECT user_id, SUM(profitloss) as profitloss
           FROM bets
           GROUP BY user_id) bets
ON bets.user_id = users.id
LEFT JOIN (SELECT user_id, SUM(profitloss) as profitloss
           FROM choices
           GROUP BY user_id) choices
ON choices.user_id = users.id
ORDER BY total_pl DESC

(Also, I believe the convention is to name tables singular, not plural.)

share|improve this answer
    
This was exactly what I needed.. Thanks a lot :) –  Twiddr Nov 30 '12 at 20:10

Your problem is that you are blowing out your data set. If you did a SELECT * you would be able to see it. Try this. I was not able to test it because I don't have your tables, but it should work

SELECT
 totals.id
 ,SUM(totals.total_pl) total_pl
FROM
(
  SELECT users.id, sum(COALESCE(bets.profitloss, 0)) as total_pl 
  FROM users 
  LEFT JOIN bets ON bets.user_id = users.id 
  GROUP BY users.id 

  UNION ALL SELECT users.id, sum(COALESCE(choices.profitloss, 0)) as total_pl 
  FROM users 
  LEFT JOIN choices ON choices.user_id = users.id 
  GROUP BY users.id 
 ) totals
GROUP BY  totals.id
ORDER BY total_pl DESC
share|improve this answer
    
-1 - Wha? This is not only unnecessarily complex, it also will not always give the right answer - the UNION means that if a particular user has the same amount of choices as bets, only one will be considered, resulting in a total that is half the correct amount (because UNION ignores duplicates). –  Clockwork-Muse Nov 30 '12 at 20:43
    
I just forgot to add the ALL to make it UNION ALL. There is no way that this is unnecessarily complex. It is a simple sub-query. In fact, I simply replaced your left joins with a UNION ALL command. So, if this is complex, so is your answer. –  Neil Nov 30 '12 at 20:50
    
... One additional GROUP BY, an additional reference to users, COALESCE() in potentially a less-performant spot. Oh, and this depends way too much on his dataset (and indices), but the use of a UNION ALL here may mean that an actual temp-table is generated, which probably won't be indexed (although, ORDER BY total_pl DESC is going to be expensive, regardless). This version also seems to be conceptualizing the problem oddly - 'add these bets and choices together', as opposed to 'for each user, add these bets and choices together'. Corrected the error, so removed the -1, though. –  Clockwork-Muse Nov 30 '12 at 21:09
    
The way I conceptualized it was getting the the bets as its table and then choices as its own. Then, aggregating the two together based upon the user. It is basically like one listing of all of their actions versus breaking it out into a separate column. I prefer DRapp's solution as it uses a left join to add that data to the customer. My way would only bring back results for those users that had bets or choices. If I had access to the table I would have been able to compare performance, but that was not available. –  Neil Nov 30 '12 at 21:22
    
.... No, it wouldn't. You're still using a LEFT JOIN (and COALESCE()), so it'd still result in having a row for each table (before the final SUM()), regardless of whether they had any values. You'd need to use a regular join to only return users that have at least one. –  Clockwork-Muse Nov 30 '12 at 21:40

In a similar solution as Clockwork, since the columns are the same per table, I would pre-union them and just sum them. So, AT MOST, the inner query will have two records per user... one for the bets, one for the choices -- each respectively pre-summed since doing a UNION ALL. Then, simple join/sum to get the results

select 
      U.userid,
      sum( coalesce( PreSum.profit, 0) ) as TotalPL
   from
      Users U
         LEFT JOIN
            ( select user_id, sum( profitloss ) as Profit
                 from bets
                 group by user_id
              UNION ALL
              select user_id, sum( profitloss ) as Profit
                 from choices
                 group by user_id ) PreSum
            on U.ID = PreSum.User_ID
   group by
      U.ID
share|improve this answer
    
...yes, this is the direction @Neil seems to be heading towards as well, and should work. However, I personally don't prefer it because bets and choices are potentially different entities (don't know the problem domain well enough), and if so should be dealt with as such. Also, the SUM() function on most RDBMSs ignores null rows, so COALESCE() should probably be pulled outside (for potential performance gains). –  Clockwork-Muse Nov 30 '12 at 20:54

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