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I'm new to Unity and I'm having a hard time trying to figure out how to expand Unity's concept of Auto Factory. Unity provides out of box the ability to create factories using Func in the place of the parameter itself. Like that:

public class Foo
{
    private readonly Func<IBar> _barFactory;

    public Foo(Func<IBar> barFactory)
    {
        _bar = barFactory;
    }
}

The thing is, there are places where the class created by the factory needs some parameters and I'll only know those parameters in run time. Other than that, the number and type of those parameters varies from class to class.

What I'm looking for is something similar to Autofac DelegateFacotry, but I would like to keep the Unity's feeling. So, I want to make Unity to work like that:

public class Foo
{
    private readonly Func<int, string, IBar> _barFactory;

    public Foo(Func<int, string, IBar> barFactory)
    {
        _bar = barFactory;
    }
}

The above code does not work, because Unity does work with that constructor, but it is exactly what I'm looking for.

I have tried use BuilderStrategy but it boils down to either Expression or IL generation. Before going down that path I would like to check for other options.

Is any one experienced enough with Unity who can help me with that?

Here are the constrains I have:

  1. Keep Unity's concept of using Func
  2. Do not need to register every single Func within the container
  3. The constructor should accept Func from Func to Func (Func is handled already)
  4. Changing the container is not an option

I hope I was clear enough. If I was not, please let me know.

Edit 1: I understand I can use abstract factories directly. But, the first goal is to keep Unity's feeling.

share|improve this question
    
It's a hard set of constraints... Having a custom delegate allows you to do parameter name matching and thus use parameter overrides (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) to create a function that calls back into the container with the overrides. In your example you want the Func to return an interface, which further complicates the solution since you could be getting any of the interfaces implementations. –  fsimonazzi Nov 30 '12 at 20:38
    
I see your point fsimonazzi. But, that way it would be simpler to use an abstract factory or register the needed types. What I'm really trying to achieve is keep the Unity's way of doing that without too much configuration. Ideally I would just build the container's calling and let Unity figure out the rest. –  Allan Nov 30 '12 at 21:08

2 Answers 2

I don't like answer my own questions. But, I was able to somehow solve the problem and I believe the solution was good enough and others may be interested. I looked at Unity's source code and get the basic idea from there. I also read a couple of posts regarding Unity. Here it is:

First, I had to create a class that inherited from IBuildPlanPlocy. It is long because I let some supporting classes within the class itself:

 public class AutomaticFactoryBuilderPolicy : IBuildPlanPolicy
{
    private readonly Dictionary<Type, Type> _callables = 
        new Dictionary<Type, Type>
            {
                {typeof(Func<,>), typeof(CallableType<,>)},
                {typeof(Func<,,>), typeof(CallableType<,,>)},
                {typeof(Func<,,,>), typeof(CallableType<,,,>)},
                {typeof(Func<,,,,>), typeof(CallableType<,,,,>)}
            };

    public void BuildUp(IBuilderContext context)
    {
        if (context.Existing == null)
        {
            var currentContainer = context.NewBuildUp<IUnityContainer>();
            var buildKey = context.BuildKey;

            string nameToBuild = buildKey.Name;

            context.Existing = CreateResolver(currentContainer, buildKey.Type, nameToBuild);
        }
    }

    private Delegate CreateResolver(IUnityContainer currentContainer, 
        Type typeToBuild, string nameToBuild)
    {
        Type[] delegateTypes = typeToBuild.GetGenericArguments();
        Type func = typeToBuild.GetGenericTypeDefinition();
        Type callable = _callables[func];

        Type callableType = callable.MakeGenericType(delegateTypes);
        Type delegateType = func.MakeGenericType(delegateTypes);
        MethodInfo resolveMethod = callableType.GetMethod("Resolve");

        object callableObject = Activator.CreateInstance(callableType, currentContainer, nameToBuild);
        return Delegate.CreateDelegate(delegateType, callableObject, resolveMethod);
    }

    private class CallableType<T1, TResult>
    {
        private readonly IUnityContainer _container;
        private readonly string _name;

        public CallableType(IUnityContainer container, string name)
        {
            _container = container;
            _name = name;
        }

        public TResult Resolve(T1 p1)
        {
            return _container.Resolve<TResult>(_name, new OrderedParametersOverride(new object[] { p1 }));
        }
    }

    private class CallableType<T1, T2, TResult>
    {
        private readonly IUnityContainer _container;
        private readonly string _name;

        public CallableType(IUnityContainer container, string name)
        {
            _container = container;
            _name = name;
        }

        public TResult Resolve(T1 p1, T2 p2)
        {
            return _container.Resolve<TResult>(_name, new OrderedParametersOverride(new object[] { p1, p2 }));
        }
    }

    private class CallableType<T1, T2, T3, TResult>
    {
        private readonly IUnityContainer _container;
        private readonly string _name;

        public CallableType(IUnityContainer container, string name)
        {
            _container = container;
            _name = name;
        }

        public TResult Resolve(T1 p1, T2 p2, T3 p3)
        {
            return _container.Resolve<TResult>(_name, new OrderedParametersOverride(new object[] { p1, p2, p3 }));
        }
    }

    private class CallableType<T1, T2, T3, T4, TResult>
    {
        private readonly IUnityContainer _container;
        private readonly string _name;

        public CallableType(IUnityContainer container, string name)
        {
            _container = container;
            _name = name;
        }

        public TResult Resolve(T1 p1, T2 p2, T3 p3, T4 p4)
        {
            return _container.Resolve<TResult>(_name, new OrderedParametersResolverOverride(new object[] { p1, p2, p3, p4 }));
        }
    } 

}

It is pretty straightforward. The trick was create one CallableType for each Func I was interested to handle. It was not as dynamic as I first wanted. But, in order to make it more dynamic I believe I would have to deal with either IL or Expression Trees. The way I have it now if good enough for me.

Second, Unity handles param by name but I had to deal with them by order. That's when OrderedParametersResolverOverride comes to play (this class is used in the code above. Check CallableType classes):

public class OrderedParametersResolverOverride : ResolverOverride
{
    private readonly Queue<InjectionParameterValue> _parameterValues;

    public OrderedParametersResolverOverride(IEnumerable<object> parameterValues)
    {
        _parameterValues = new Queue<InjectionParameterValue>();
        foreach (var parameterValue in parameterValues)
        {
            _parameterValues.Enqueue(InjectionParameterValue.ToParameter(parameterValue));
        }
    }

    public override IDependencyResolverPolicy GetResolver(IBuilderContext context, Type dependencyType)
    {
        if (_parameterValues.Count < 1)
            return null;

        var value = _parameterValues.Dequeue();
        return value.GetResolverPolicy(dependencyType);
    }
}

Those two classes deal with Func creation. Next step is add that Builder to Unity's pipeline. We'll need to create a UnityContainerExtension:

public class AutomaticFactoryExtension: UnityContainerExtension
{
    protected override void Initialize()
    {
        var automaticFactoryBuilderPolicy = new AutomaticFactoryBuilderPolicy();

        Context.Policies.Set(typeof(Microsoft.Practices.ObjectBuilder2.IBuildPlanPolicy),
            automaticFactoryBuilderPolicy,
            new Microsoft.Practices.ObjectBuilder2.NamedTypeBuildKey(typeof(Func<,>)));

        Context.Policies.Set(typeof(Microsoft.Practices.ObjectBuilder2.IBuildPlanPolicy),
            automaticFactoryBuilderPolicy,
            new Microsoft.Practices.ObjectBuilder2.NamedTypeBuildKey(typeof(Func<,,>)));

        Context.Policies.Set(typeof(Microsoft.Practices.ObjectBuilder2.IBuildPlanPolicy),
            automaticFactoryBuilderPolicy,
            new Microsoft.Practices.ObjectBuilder2.NamedTypeBuildKey(typeof(Func<,,,>)));

        Context.Policies.Set(typeof(Microsoft.Practices.ObjectBuilder2.IBuildPlanPolicy),
            automaticFactoryBuilderPolicy,
            new Microsoft.Practices.ObjectBuilder2.NamedTypeBuildKey(typeof(Func<,,,,>)));
    }
}

The last piece is actually add that class to Unity's pipeline:

IUnityContainer container = new UnityContainer();
container.AddExtension(new AutomaticFactoryExtension());

The rest of registration is standard.

Now it is possible to have constructors from Func<> to Fun<,,,,>. The following constructor, for instance, is now handled (assuming it is possible to resolve IFoo):

public class Bar
{
    private readonly Func<int, string, IFoo> _fooFactory;

    public Bar(Func<int, string, IFoo> fooFactory)
    {
        _fooFactory = fooFactory;
    }
}

Let me know if there is any question.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
That's a good solution, but do note that it obviously requires a specific ctor to be chosen by unity that matches the signature of the Func and if they don't match you'll get errors at runtime. Also keep in mind that InjectionParameterValue.ToParameter will change Type instances into requests to resolve dependencies. So if you need to pass a Type as a ctor parameter you will need to wrap it into an InjectionParameter<Type> and that should be in the signature of the func you resolve. –  fsimonazzi Dec 3 '12 at 14:12
    
Yes, I understand the constructor limitation. But it is good enough to solve my problem. i didn't know about the Type limitation. I do not need to use type as constructors arguments (so far). Anyway, would you have any code example (end to end) to deal with that? –  Allan Dec 4 '12 at 14:52
    
If you had this: public interface IFoo { void DoSomething(); } public class Bar : IFoo { private int theInt; private Type theType; public Bar(int theInt, Type theType) { this.theInt = theInt; this.theType = theType; } public void DoSomething() { Console.WriteLine(this.theInt + " " + this.theType.Name); } } –  fsimonazzi Dec 5 '12 at 1:34
    
You would resolve the func like this: var factory = container.Resolve<Func<int, InjectionParameter<Type>, IFoo>>(); var instance = factory(199, new InjectionParameter<Type>(typeof(string))); instance.DoSomething(); –  fsimonazzi Dec 5 '12 at 1:35
    
Neat! Thanks for your help, fsimonazzi. –  Allan Dec 5 '12 at 15:52

Have you thought about creating a delegate and registering and instance of that with Unity? That way you'd have named parameters and comments on those parameters, as well as the delegate itself. Then you wouldn't need to create build policies, and your code would be more readable.

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