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I have a table of statuses, each of which have a name attribute. Currently I can do:

FooStatus.find_by_name("bar")

And that's fine. But I'm wondering if I could do:

FooStatus.bar

So I have this approach:

class FooStatus < ActiveRecord::Base
  def self.method_missing(meth, *args, &block)
    if self.allowed_statuses.include?(meth.to_s.titleize)
      self.where("name = ?", meth.to_s.titleize).first
    else
      super(meth, *args, &block)
    end
  end

  def self.allowed_statuses
    self.pluck(:name)
  end
end

The above code works, but it leads to the following weird behavior:

FooStatus.respond_to?(:bar) => false
FooStatus.bar => #<FooStatus name: 'bar'>

That's not great, but if I try to implement respond_to?, I get a recursion problem

class FooStatus < ActiveRecord::Base
  def self.method_missing(meth, *args, &block)
    if self.allowed_statuses.include?(meth.to_s.titleize)
      self.where("name = ?", meth.to_s.titleize).first
    else
      super(meth, *args, &block)
    end
  end

  def self.allowed_statuses
    self.pluck(:name)
  end

  def self.respond_to?(meth, include_private = false)
    if self.allowed_statuses.include?(meth.to_s.titleize)
      true
    else
      super(meth)
    end
  end
end

And that gets me:

FooStatus.bar => ThreadError: deadlock; recursive locking

Any ideas on getting method_missing and respond_to to work together?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I agree with Philip Hallstrom's suggestion. If you know allowed_statuses when the class is built, then just loop through the list and define the methods explicitly:

%w(foo bar baz).each do |status|
  define_singleton_method(status) do
    where("name = ?", status.titleize).first
  end
end

…or if you need that list of statuses elsewhere in the code:

ALLOWED_STATUSES = %w(foo bar baz).freeze
ALLOWED_STATUSES.each do |status|
  define_singleton_method(status) do
    where("name = ?", status.titleize).first
  end
end

Clearer, shorter, and far less prone to future breakage and weird rabbit hole conflicts with ActiveRecord like the one you're in.

You can do really cool things with method_missing and friends, but it's not the first approach to go to when doing metaprogramming. Explicit is usually better when possible.

I also agree with Philip's concernt about creating conflicts with built-in methods. Having a hard-coded list of statuses prevents that from going too far, but you might consider a convention like FooStatus.named_bar instead of FooStatus.bar if that list is likely to grow or change.

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I don't know if I'd recommend your approach... seems too magical to me and I worry about what happens when you have a status with a name of 'destroy' or some other method you might legitimately want to call (or that Rails' calls internally that you aren't aware of).

But... instead of mucking with method missing, I think you'd be better off extending the class and automatically defining the methods by looping through allowed_statuses and creating them. This will make respond_to? work. And you could also check to make sure it's not already defined somewhere else...

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I'm not sure I'd recommend it either, actually! It's more of a learning exercise than it is a good idea. –  Hopwise Nov 30 '12 at 20:22
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Use a scope.

class FooStatus < ActiveRecord::Base
  scope :bar, where(:name => "bar")

  # etc
end

Now, you can do FooStatus.bar which will return an ActiveRelation object. If you expect this to return a single instance, you could do FooStatus.bar.first or if many FooStatus.bar.all, or you could put the .first or .all on the end of the scope in which case it'll return the same thing as the finder.

You can also define a scope with a lambda if the input isn't constant (not always "bar"). Section 13.1 of this guide has an example

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Sure. But I was trying for something that would work when new statuses were added, without me having to add new scopes. I could do a generic "with_name" scope, but then I might as well just use find_by_name. –  Hopwise Nov 30 '12 at 20:21
    
Ah, the ultimate meta-programming challenge :-) Well, of course it can be done, but ... why? What's your use-case? It would create super-fragile code -- if you had FooStatus.fubar in your code then removed the status named Fubar from your database, your code would break, right? In these case, I prefer to think like a caveman and do something like creating a constant array or hash, or something dynamic that I stick in a cache at startup. In (glurg) Java, I would use an Enum. Like I said: caveman. –  Tom Harrison Jr Nov 30 '12 at 20:35
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