Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently inherited a python project, and I'm working on maintaining it now. Part of the code makes a few hundred thousand requests from a website and saves the results to a database. The code is reusing the same httplib.HTTPConnection object for reach request and then just looping over a

conn.request("GET",someString,'',headers)

response = conn.getresponse()

section. A few days ago in my logs I saw that one of the requests threw the exception:

[Errno 104] Connection reset by peer  

followed by every other conn.request() failing. My first inclination was to just build a new connection for each request, but the perfomance impact of that was profound and horrible. So my question is, how do I fix this, especially since I'm not 100% sure how I can even really test this.

If I just call conn.connect() after an exception, will it correctly reconnect?

I'm looking for advise on how to fix it and possibly how I could test it.

Thanks for your time.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you first need to decide the failure mode you want to handle. For instance, did the connection reset because of a temporary resource problem on the server and a quick turnaround connect will fix it? Or, is the server down or rebooting and you should abort your process?

Presuming the first case, I think you are thinking along the right lines. Try something like this (note, this is not working code - it's just an example of the logic):

while True:
    try:
        conn.request("GET",someString,'',headers)
        response = conn.getresponse()
    except httplib.HTTPException, e:
        conn.connect()
        continue
    break

You should probably add some logic to that to pause between repeated connect attempts and to give up after a certain number of tries (which is basically the second scenario above).

In order to test this, try using tcpkill to cause the TCP connection to reset:

http://www.gnutoolbox.com/tcpkill-command/

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the best way to do it, given httplib. However, it might be easier for OP to switch to a more powerful library like urllib3 or requests (requests is a wrapper around urllib3). urllib3 handles the connection pooling and re-using of connections, and initiates a new connection when one dies. It does all this automatically. httplib is considered archaic. –  Anorov Nov 30 '12 at 21:29
    
TCPkill is great, thank you for showing me that. And I will take a look at swapping to urllib3 as Anorov suggests as well. Thank you both. –  Dio Nov 30 '12 at 22:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.