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I'm trying to solve the following problem in Java:

There is a bar in which smoking and non-smoking customers go. The bar has a limited number of seats for customers. Smoking and non-smoking customers can't be present in the bar at the same time. Every customer spends some time traveling to the bar, then enters and spends some time in the bar and finally leaves, freeing his seat for other customers waiting to get in. After the smoking customers have left the bar, the air inside needs to be refreshed so that non-smoking customers can come.

Create a simple simulation of this problem using threads synchronization methods in Java and make sure deadlock doesn't occur.

What I could come up with was the following code. I have one problem though - how to implement the condition that the bar needs to be locked for the time needed to refresh its air?

This is the code:

class Bar {
    int maxP;
    int curP;
    String state;

    public Bar(int maxP) {
        this.maxP = maxP;
        curP = 0;
        state = "none";
    }
    public synchronized void enterBar(Customer customer) {
        if(state == "none") {
            state = customer.smokingStatus;
        }
        while((curP == maxP) || state != customer.smokingStatus) {
            System.out.println(customer.name+" " + customer.smokingStatus + " is waiting to enter the bar. ");
            try {
                wait();
                if(curP == 0 && state == "none") {
                    state = customer.smokingStatus;
                }
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        curP++;
        System.out.println(customer.name +" "+ customer.smokingStatus + " enters the bar and relaxes. ");

    }
    public synchronized void leaveBar(Customer customer) {
        curP--;
        if(curP == 0) {
                 state = "none";
             }
        System.out.println(customer.name +" " + customer.smokingStatus + " stops relaxing and leaves the bar.");
        notifyAll();
    }
}

Then class Customer:

class Customer extends Thread {
    String name;
    String smokingStatus;
    Bar bar;

    public Customer(String name, String smoker, Bar bar) {
        this.name = name;
        this.smokingStatus = smoker;
        this.bar = bar;
    }
    public void run() {
        System.out.println(this.name + " is traveling to the bar.");
        try {
            sleep((int)(Math.random()*1000));
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        bar.enterBar(this);
        try {
            sleep((int)(Math.random()*5000));
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        if (this.smokingStatus.equals("smoker")){
            System.out.println("After I've been here the bar's air needs some refreshing.");
            try {
                sleep((int)(Math.random()*2000));
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        bar.leaveBar(this);
    }
}

And finally the main() method:

class MainApp {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Bar s = new Bar(5);
        for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            String smokingStatus;
            smokingStatus = Math.random() > 0.5 ? "smoker" : "nonsmoker";
            (new Customer("Customer " + i, smokingStatus, s)).start();
        }
    }
}

How do I lock the bar for air refreshing?

share|improve this question
    
You'll need dedicated "Refresher" thread which will check if departed customer left unpleasant odor behind. Incoming non-smoking customer will check if odor is present and will block until refresher thread finish it's work. –  Victor Sorokin Nov 30 '12 at 21:46
    
For the record I sort of hate this question, this is an absurd use of multithreading and whatever locking mechanism the author expects you to come up with wouldn't last 10 seconds in a serious code review. –  AAA Nov 30 '12 at 21:47
    
@djechlin: I kind of like it, personally. Replace Customer by Working thread and Bar by connection pool, and you have a more realistic but more abstract problem. –  JB Nizet Nov 30 '12 at 21:52
    
Do not use == and != to compare Strings. You are checking for object reference equality and not that the characters are the same. You have lucked out in that this implementation will work on most JVMs as they cache String constants. Always, always use the equals method to compare Strings. Better yet, use an enum to represent the bar state rather than Strings. –  Dunes Dec 2 '12 at 13:44

2 Answers 2

I have created a modified version of Magee & Kramer's example about red & blue cars on a bridge. See here (http://flylib.com/books/en/2.752.1.48/1/). I have added the TIME_TO_CLEAR_AIR and MAX_PATRONS stuff. Should be pretty close to what you want. Rename variables to suit. Call the appropriate enter/exit method as per customer type.

public class SafeBar {

 // smokers in the bar
 private int smokers = 0; 

 private int MAX_PATRONS = 20;

 // non-smokers in the bar
 private int nonSmokers = 0; 

 // last time a smoker left the bar
 private long lastSmoke = 0;
 private long TIME_TO_CLEAR_AIR = 10000; // 10 seconds

 synchronized void smokerEnter() throws InterruptedException { 

    while (nonSmokers>0||smokers==MAX_PATRONS) { 
        wait();
    }

    ++smokers; 
 } 

 synchronized void smokerExit(){ 
    --smokers; 
    if (smokers==0) lastSmoke = new Date().getTime();
    notifyAll(); 
 } 

 synchronized void nonSmokerEnter() throws InterruptedException { 

    long checkTime = 0;
    while (smokers>0||nonSmokers==MAX_PATRONS||(checkTime = new Date().getTime()) - lastSmoke < TIME_TO_CLEAR_AIR) {
        if (checkTime - lastSmoke < TIME_TO_CLEAR_AIR)
            wait(TIME_TO_CLEAR_AIR - (checkTime - lastSmoke));
        else 
            wait(); 
    }

    ++nonSmokers; 
 } 

 synchronized void nonSmokerExit(){ 
    --nonSmokers; 
    notifyAll(); 
 } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this is thread safe. wait releases a thread's lock on an object. Meaning a non-smoker would find they have to wait before they can enter the bar, in the mean time a new smoker enters the bar, so now the non-smoker definitely can't enter, but they do not recheck whether they can enter again. Thus a smoker and a non-smoker can be in the bar at the same time. –  Dunes Dec 2 '12 at 13:39
    
@Dunes "but they do not recheck whether they can enter again". They absolutely do. See the while loop. The situation you mention is impossible. This solution is thread-safe. –  xagyg Dec 2 '12 at 13:51
    
Sorry, I guess I misread you code. –  Dunes Dec 2 '12 at 23:02

In the leaveBar(Customer) method, if the customer leaving the bar is a smoker and is the last one, then start a new thread that sleeps for some time (the time to refresh), and finally tells the bar that the air is fresh. Once the air is fresh, then call notifyAll() to let the next customer enter the bar.

share|improve this answer
    
can't new smokers enter even when the air is not fresh? –  Kevin Nov 30 '12 at 21:52
1  
I don't know. Ask the teacher for that. If it were me, smokers would not be allowed to smoke in the bar at all :-) –  JB Nizet Nov 30 '12 at 21:54
    
"After the smoking customers have left the bar, the air inside needs to be refreshed so that non-smoking customers can come." no need to ask its pretty clear that the rule only applies to nonsmokers. –  Kevin Dec 1 '12 at 0:01

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