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I'm working with CUDA (GPGPU programming) for some research and the innate Double Precision performance suffers compares to the Single Precision performance (by a factor of 24!), due to a new hardware architecture. I've decided to try and use two uint's to represent one double. This way I could run DP calculations without a significant performance hit.

For example, let's say we want to represent the double 10.12 using this method.

uint real = 10, decimal = 12;

Therefore; 'real.decimal' visually represents our double.

Let's call this type a 'single'.

Given: single a = 10.12, b = 20.24;

What would be an efficient algorithm to multiply, divide, add, and subtract two single's?

single c = a * b;

Please remember, for this to work, it's not possible to do ANY DP calculations or use a data type larger than 32 bits.

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What you've described is fixed-point arithmetic not actually floating point. Two uints cannot represent the full range of a double using this method unless you incorporate an exponent represenation of some sort. Nevertheless it's a good idea if you can make sure that your problem fits within the indicated range of your represenation (or can be scaled to fit within that range). In the old days, when fixed-point DSPs were prevalent, there were lots of examples of this, so conceptually it wouldn't be unique to GPUs. Google might be your friend. –  Robert Crovella Nov 30 '12 at 21:54
    
Is 64-bit integer arithmetic equivalently bad as double? I don't think so, so why the 32-bit limitation? –  CygnusX1 Nov 30 '12 at 22:49
    
a long 64 bit integer is not generally referred to as DP. DP refers to double-precision floating point (i.e. the double C type) GPUs generally have different execution units for SP (single-precision floating point, i.e. float) arithemetic, DP arithmetic, and integer arithmetic (whether 32 or 64 bit). You may want to refer to the relevant throughput table. –  Robert Crovella Nov 30 '12 at 23:44
    
That's a very useful table. Thank you for pointing it out. –  JohnDoe Nov 30 '12 at 23:57
    
On the GTX680, 32-bit integer multiplication performance is also very low, so fixed point mul will be slow as well. This question may be of interest. –  Roger Dahl Dec 1 '12 at 1:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to replace double precision, you could look into using a "double single" representation where the operands are pairs of single-precision numbers refered to as the "head" and the "tail", and which satisfy the normalization requirement that |tail| <= 0.5 * ulp (|head|). CUDA's float2 is the appropriate type to hold the pairs of floats needed. For example, the less signficant x-component would represent the "tail", and the more significant y-component the "head".

Note that this does not provide exactly the same accuracy as double precision. The precision of this representation is limited to 49 bits (24 bits from each of the single-precision mantissa plus 1 bit the sign bit of the tail) vs 53 for double precision. The operations won't provide IEEE rounding, and the range may also be reduced somewhat due to overflow of temporary quantities inside the multiplication code. Subnormal quantities may also not be accurately representable.

I don't think the performance will be significantly better than using the native double-precision operations of your GPU, as register pressure will be higher and the number of single-precision operations required for each "double single" operation is fairly substantial. You could of course just try and measure the performance for both variants.

Below is an example of an addition in "double single" format. The source of the algorithm is noted in the comment. I believe that the cited work is in turn based on the work of D. Priest who did research in this subject matter in the late 1980s or early 1990s. For a worked example of a "double single" multiplication, you could take a look at the function __internal_dsmul() in the file math_functions.h that ships with CUDA.

A quick remark on 64-bit integer operations in CUDA (as one commenter noted this as a potential alternative). Current GPU hardware has very limited support for native 64-bit integer operations, basically providing conversion from and to floating-point types, and indexing using 64-bit addresses in loads and stores. Otherwise 64-bit integer operations are implemented via native 32-bit operations, as one can easily see by looking at disassembled code (cuobjdump --dump-sass).

/* Based on: Andrew Thall, Extended-Precision Floating-Point Numbers for GPU 
   Computation. Retrieved from http://andrewthall.org/papers/df64_qf128.pdf
   on 7/12/2011.
*/
__device__ float2 dsadd (float2 a, float2 b)
{
    float2 z;
    float t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, e;

    t1 = __fadd_rn (a.y, b.y);
    t2 = __fadd_rn (t1, -a.y);
    t3 = __fadd_rn (__fadd_rn (a.y, t2 - t1), __fadd_rn (b.y, -t2));
    t4 = __fadd_rn (a.x, b.x);
    t2 = __fadd_rn (t4, -a.x);
    t5 = __fadd_rn (__fadd_rn (a.x, t2 - t4), __fadd_rn (b.x, -t2));
    t3 = __fadd_rn (t3, t4);
    t4 = __fadd_rn (t1, t3);
    t3 = __fadd_rn (t1 - t4, t3);
    t3 = __fadd_rn (t3, t5);
    z.y = e = __fadd_rn (t4, t3);
    z.x = __fadd_rn (t4 - e, t3);
    return z;
}
share|improve this answer

The answer posted by @njuffa is almost certainly the smartest way forward for this desire. I don't know how fast it would be, but since it taps into the highest throughput engine on the device (the single precision floating point engine) it would seem to be best of any competing alternative. Nevertheless you did ask for a fixed point representation so I thought I would go ahead and post this anyway, just using this question as a repository of ideas.

This code has many caveats:

  1. not extensively tested
  2. probably slower than most alternatives
  3. doesn't do signed arithmetic (you mentioned uint), so subtract is questionable
  4. didn't implement divide
  5. no overflow/underflow checking
  6. ignored request to absolutely not use any 64 bit representation or operation. I have not used any 64-bit (DP) floating point ops of course, but I do use 64 bit integer ops. My rationale is that (in some cases,) me breaking up the inherently 64 bit representation proposed into two 32 bit quantities, doing a bunch of 32 bit ops, and then re-assembling is senseless when the machine (compiler) will do exactly this anyway if I request 64 bit (integer) ops.
  7. not optimized. You could probably do a better job with PTX, but it might be in the category of "polishing a turd".

So I offer this up as a framework, for amusement, and perhaps so you can see how much slower doing it in a "true" fixed point format would be as compared to using e.g. the SP engines.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define N 10000
#define nTPB 512
#define SCALE 1
#define MUL_ERR_LIM (0.0000001 * SCALE * SCALE)
#define ADD_ERR_LIM (0.0000001 * SCALE)

#define cudaCheckErrors(msg) \
    do { \
        cudaError_t __err = cudaGetLastError(); \
        if (__err != cudaSuccess) { \
            fprintf(stderr, "Fatal error: %s (%s at %s:%d)\n", \
                msg, cudaGetErrorString(__err), \
                __FILE__, __LINE__); \
            fprintf(stderr, "*** FAILED - ABORTING\n"); \
            exit(1); \
        } \
    } while (0)


// fixed point number representation: 32 bit whole portion and 32 bit decimal
typedef union {
  struct {
    unsigned d;   // decimal portion
    unsigned w;   // whole number portion
  } part;
  unsigned long val;
} fxp;


__device__ __host__ inline fxp fxp_add(fxp a, fxp b){
  fxp temp;
  temp.val = a.val + b.val;
  return temp; 
}

__device__ __host__ inline fxp fxp_sub(fxp a, fxp b){
  fxp temp;
  temp.val = a.val - b.val;
  return temp;
}

__device__ __host__ inline unsigned fxp_whole(fxp a){
  return a.part.w;
}

__device__ __host__ inline unsigned fxp_decimal(fxp a){
  return a.part.d;
}

__device__ __host__ inline void fxp_set_whole(fxp *a, unsigned val){
  a->part.w = val;
}

__device__ __host__ inline void fxp_set_decimal(fxp *a, unsigned val){
  a->part.d = val;
}

__device__ __host__ inline fxp float_to_fxp(float val){
  fxp temp;
  temp.part.w = (unsigned) truncf(val);
  temp.part.d = (unsigned) rintf((val - truncf(val)) * 0x0000000100000000ul);
  return temp;
}

__device__ __host__ inline float fxp_to_float(fxp val){
  return val.part.w + (val.part.d/(float)0x0000000100000000ul);
}

__device__ __host__ inline fxp double_to_fxp(double val){
  fxp temp;
  temp.part.w = (unsigned) trunc(val);
  temp.part.d = (unsigned) rint((val - trunc(val)) * 0x0000000100000000ul);
  return temp;
}

__device__ __host__ inline double fxp_to_double(fxp val){
  return val.part.w + (val.part.d/(double)0x0000000100000000ul);
}

__device__ __host__ fxp fxp_mul(fxp a, fxp b){
  fxp temp;
  unsigned long ltemp = ((unsigned long)a.part.w * (unsigned long)b.part.d) + ((unsigned long)a.part.d * (unsigned long)b.part.w);
  unsigned utemp = (unsigned) (ltemp & 0x0FFFFFFFFul);
  temp.part.w = (unsigned) (ltemp >> 32);
  temp.part.d = (unsigned) (((unsigned long)a.part.d * (unsigned long)b.part.d) >> 32) + utemp;
  temp.part.w += (a.part.w * b.part.w) + ((temp.part.d < utemp) ? 1:0);
  return temp;
}

__global__ void fxp_test(float *a, float *b, float *s, float *p, double *da, double *db, double *ds, double *dp, unsigned n){

  unsigned idx = threadIdx.x + (blockDim.x * blockIdx.x);
  if (idx < n){
   float la = a[idx];
   float lb = b[idx];
   double lda = da[idx];
   double ldb = db[idx];
   s[idx] = fxp_to_float(fxp_add(float_to_fxp(la), float_to_fxp(lb)));
   p[idx] = fxp_to_float(fxp_mul(float_to_fxp(la), float_to_fxp(lb)));
   ds[idx] = fxp_to_double(fxp_add(double_to_fxp(lda), double_to_fxp(ldb)));
   dp[idx] = fxp_to_double(fxp_mul(double_to_fxp(lda), double_to_fxp(ldb)));
   }
}



int main(){

  fxp a,b,c;
  float x,y,z, xp, yp, zp;
  double dx, dy, dz, dxp, dyp, dzp;
  if (sizeof(unsigned) != 4) {printf("unsigned type size error: %d\n", sizeof(unsigned)); return 1;}
  if (sizeof(unsigned long) != 8) {printf("unsigned long type error: %d\n", sizeof(unsigned long)); return 1;}
// test host side
  x = 76.705116;
  y = 1.891480;

  a = float_to_fxp(x);
  b = float_to_fxp(y);
// test conversions
  xp = fxp_to_float(a);
  yp = fxp_to_float(b);
  printf("con: a = %f, a should be %f, b = %f, b should be %f\n", xp, x, yp, y);
// test multiply
  c = fxp_mul(a, b);
  z = x*y;
  zp = fxp_to_float(c);
  printf("mul: a = %f, b = %f, c = %f, c should be %f\n", x, y, zp, z);
//test add
  c = fxp_add(a, b);
  z = x+y;
  zp = fxp_to_float(c);
  printf("add: a = %f, b = %f, c = %f, c should be %f\n", x, y, zp, z);
//test subtract
  c = fxp_sub(a, b);
  z = x-y;
  zp = fxp_to_float(c);
  printf("sub: a = %f, b = %f, c = %f, c should be %f\n", x, y, zp, z);

// now test doubles
  dx = 6.7877;
  dy = 5.2444;

  a = double_to_fxp(dx);
  b = double_to_fxp(dy);
// test conversions
  dxp = fxp_to_double(a);
  dyp = fxp_to_double(b);
  printf("dbl con: a = %f, a should be %f, b = %f, b should be %f\n", dxp, dx, dyp, dy);
// test multiply
  c = fxp_mul(a, b);
  dz = dx*dy;
  dzp = fxp_to_double(c);
  printf("double mul: a = %f, b = %f, c = %f, c should be %f\n", dx, dy, dzp, dz);
//test add
  c = fxp_add(a, b);
  dz = dx+dy;
  dzp = fxp_to_double(c);
  printf("double add: a = %f, b = %f, c = %f, c should be %f\n", dx, dy, dzp, dz);
//test subtract
  c = fxp_sub(a, b);
  dz = dx-dy;
  dzp = fxp_to_double(c);
  printf("double sub: a = %f, b = %f, c = %f, c should be %f\n", dx, dy, dzp, dz);

// test device side
  float *h_a, *d_a, *h_b, *d_b, *h_s, *d_s, *h_p, *d_p;
  double *h_da, *d_da, *h_db, *d_db, *h_ds, *d_ds, *h_dp, *d_dp;

  if ((h_a=(float *)malloc(N*sizeof(float))) == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}
  if ((h_b=(float *)malloc(N*sizeof(float))) == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}
  if ((h_s=(float *)malloc(N*sizeof(float))) == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}
  if ((h_p=(float *)malloc(N*sizeof(float))) == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}
  if ((h_da=(double *)malloc(N*sizeof(double))) == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}
  if ((h_db=(double *)malloc(N*sizeof(double))) == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}
  if ((h_ds=(double *)malloc(N*sizeof(double))) == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}
  if ((h_dp=(double *)malloc(N*sizeof(double))) == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}

  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_a, N*sizeof(float));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamalloc fail");
  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_b, N*sizeof(float));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamalloc fail");
  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_s, N*sizeof(float));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamalloc fail");
  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_p, N*sizeof(float));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamalloc fail");
  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_da, N*sizeof(double));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamalloc fail");
  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_db, N*sizeof(double));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamalloc fail");
  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_ds, N*sizeof(double));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamalloc fail");
  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_dp, N*sizeof(double));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamalloc fail");

  for (unsigned i = 0; i < N; i++){
    h_a[i] = (float)drand48() * SCALE;
    h_b[i] = (float)drand48() * SCALE;
    h_da[i] = drand48()*SCALE;
    h_db[i] = drand48()*SCALE;
    }

  cudaMemcpy(d_a, h_a, N*sizeof(float), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamemcpy fail");
  cudaMemcpy(d_b, h_b, N*sizeof(float), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamemcpy fail");
  cudaMemcpy(d_da, h_da, N*sizeof(double), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamemcpy fail");
  cudaMemcpy(d_db, h_db, N*sizeof(double), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamemcpy fail");

  fxp_test<<<(N+nTPB-1)/nTPB, nTPB>>>(d_a, d_b, d_s, d_p, d_da, d_db, d_ds, d_dp, N);
  cudaCheckErrors("kernel fail");


  cudaMemcpy(h_s, d_s, N*sizeof(float), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamemcpy fail");
  cudaMemcpy(h_p, d_p, N*sizeof(float), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamemcpy fail");
  cudaMemcpy(h_ds, d_ds, N*sizeof(double), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamemcpy fail");
  cudaMemcpy(h_dp, d_dp, N*sizeof(double), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamemcpy fail");

  for (unsigned i=0; i<N; i++){
    if (fabsf(h_s[i] - (h_a[i] + h_b[i])) > ADD_ERR_LIM) {printf("float add mismatch at %d, a: %f b: %f gpu: %f  cpu: %f\n", i, h_a[i], h_b[i],  h_s[i], (h_a[i] + h_b[i])); return 1;}
    if (fabsf(h_p[i] - (h_a[i] * h_b[i])) > MUL_ERR_LIM) {printf("float mul mismatch at %d, a: %f b: %f gpu: %f  cpu: %f\n", i, h_a[i], h_b[i],  h_p[i], (h_a[i] * h_b[i])); return 1;}
    if (fabs(h_ds[i] - (h_da[i] + h_db[i])) > ADD_ERR_LIM) {printf("double add mismatch at %d, a: %f b: %f gpu: %f  cpu: %f\n", i, h_da[i], h_db[i], h_ds[i], (h_da[i] + h_db[i])); return 1;}
    if (fabs(h_dp[i] - (h_da[i] * h_db[i])) > MUL_ERR_LIM) {printf("double mul mismatch at %d, a: %f b: %f gpu: %f  cpu: %f\n", i, h_da[i], h_db[i], h_dp[i], (h_da[i] * h_db[i])); return 1;}
    }
  printf("GPU results match!\n");
  return 0;
} 

As an aside, the molecular dynamics research code AMBER runs fast on GPUs and implements several different arithmetic models to achieve it's speed, including a mixture of SP and DP calculations as well as an SPFP format, which uses a fixed-point representation for some work and SP for other work. I don't know the details of it however. But apparently it can be done to good effect.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, Nice question. Glad to see that you are answering more. –  dreamcrash Dec 3 '12 at 23:18

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