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What is the most elegant code to validate that a string is a valid email address?

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7  

21 Answers 21

up vote 56 down vote accepted

Have a look at Phil Haack's article: "I Knew How To Validate An Email Address Until I Read The RFC"

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1  
that's very enlightening... –  RCIX Sep 2 '09 at 2:40
7  
How long would you last on the internet with the email address: "Joe\\Blow"@example.com ? –  Matthew Lock Sep 2 '09 at 3:32
    
This is a nice article. I will forward that to some of my colleague. –  Pierre-Alain Vigeant Sep 3 '09 at 16:52
    
That article is simplistic and I don't understand why this was the accepted answer (excuse me, Luke); Phil's regular expression accepts even single letter tlds! foo@example.com.x –  Efran Cobisi Sep 22 '11 at 5:51
2  
@EfranCobisi as far as rfc2822 is concerned .x is a valid top level domain. I'm pretty sure that Phil's regex is not complete (as someone mentioned complete regex to validate email according to RFC takes up couple of pages), but top level domain is definitely not an issue. –  valentinas Jan 16 '13 at 4:36

What about this?

bool IsValidEmail(string email)
{
    try {
        var addr = new System.Net.Mail.MailAddress(email);
        return addr.Address == email;
    }
    catch {
        return false;
    }
}

Edit

To clarify, the question is asking whether a particular string is a valid representation of an e-mail address, not whether an e-mail address is a valid destination to send a message.

Before you comment, please read the article linked in the accepted answer. E-mail addresses are much more forgiving than you probably assume.

As for using exception handling for business logic, I agree that is a thing to be avoided. But this is one of those cases where the convenience and clarity may outweigh the dogma.

Edit 2

Per Stuart's comment, I changed it to compare the final address with the original string instead of always returning true on success. MailAddress tries to parse a string with spaces into "Display Name" and "Address" portions, so the original version was returning false positives.

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4  
i don't think it works. i just tried it with simply a@a and it returned true. thats wrong. –  Mouffette Oct 11 '09 at 5:59
7  
Actually, that's not incorrect. a@a is a valid e-mail address. See haacked.com/archive/2007/08/21/… In fact, this method does return incorrect results if you use an address with quotes. –  Cogwheel Oct 15 '09 at 13:37
31  
+1: This is the best answer if you're using the System.Net.Mail classes to send mail, which you probably are if you're using .NET. We made the decision to use this type of validation simply because there is no point in us accepting email addresses - even valid ones - that we cannot send mail to. –  Greg Beech Feb 25 '10 at 17:18
5  
I don't recommend. It returns true: IsValidEmail("this is not valid@email$com"); –  Kakashi Dec 11 '11 at 18:33
13  
This is a horrible comment. And now write 100 times: "I will not disregard practical realities in order to cling to dogmatic principles." –  Cogwheel Feb 6 at 21:49

Personally, I would say that you should just make sure there is an @ symbol in there, with possibly a . character. There's many regexes you could use of varying correctness, but I think most of these leave out valid email addresses, or let invalid ones through. If people want to put in a fake email address, they will put in a fake one. If you need to verify that the email address is legit, and that the person is in control of that email address, then you will need to send them an email with a special coded link so they can verify that it indeed is a real address.

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4  
I personally think you should do a bit more validation than that. Someone's bound to try Bobby Table's email address or worse. –  Luke Quinane Sep 2 '09 at 1:20
11  
What's wrong with bobby table's email address if you're using prepared statements. We're talking about valid email addresses, not other things that have nothing to do with what constitues a valid email address, like how to properly do SQL queries so that you don't get SQL injection problems. –  Kibbee Sep 2 '09 at 2:06
    
I guess you don't know what someone will put in there but a malicious person knows that the value may eventually be fed into your mail system. I'd just prefer to go defense in depth and be a bit stricter. –  Luke Quinane Sep 2 '09 at 2:17
3  
That's for the mail system to worry about. I wouldn't go around rejecting perfectly valid email addresses just because it could be a security issue with some other system. If all your email server needs is a malformed email address to cause security problems, you should probably switch to another server. –  Kibbee Sep 2 '09 at 15:44
1  
Defence in depth only works if each level of your security onion is not rotten. One rotten layer means you spoil the whole onion. Rejecting "foo@example.com.au" because you want to defend against vulnerabilities in Sun's µ-law encoding doesn't make sense, does it? Don't laugh, it's happened to me. The reason I am here commenting is that Medicare Australia doesn't allow ".au" addresses, only ".com". Also read Mark Swanson, "How not to validate email, ", mdswanson.com/blog/2013/10/14/… –  ManicDee Nov 22 '13 at 5:21

This is an old question, but all the answers I've found on SO, including more recent ones, are answered similarly to this one. However, in .Net 4.5 / MVC 4 you can add email address validation to a form by adding the [EmailAddress] annotation from System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations, so I was wondering why I couldn't just use the built-in functionality from .Net in general.

This seems to work, and seems to me to be fairly elegant:

using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;

class ValidateSomeEmails
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var foo = new EmailAddressAttribute();
        bool bar;
        bar = foo.IsValid("someone@somewhere.com");         //true
        bar = foo.IsValid("someone@somewhere.co.uk");       //true
        bar = foo.IsValid("someone+tag@somewhere.net");     //true
        bar = foo.IsValid("futureTLD@somewhere.fooo");      //true

        bar = foo.IsValid("fdsa");                          //false
        bar = foo.IsValid("fdsa@");                         //false
        bar = foo.IsValid("fdsa@fdsa");                     //false
        bar = foo.IsValid("fdsa@fdsa.");                    //false

        //one-liner
        if (new EmailAddressAttribute().IsValid("someone@somewhere.com"))
            bar = true;    
    }
}
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Looks like closing ) is missing in one-liner example –  Artemix Jul 9 '13 at 15:51
    
yep- fixed, thanks –  imjosh Jul 10 '13 at 15:37
    
Cool, although it's disappointing that MS can't make this agree with their own documentation. This rejects js@proseware.com9 –  emodendroket Jul 30 at 18:27

I took Phil's answer from #1 and created this class. Call it like this: bool isValid = Validator.EmailIsValid(emailString);

Here is the class:

using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

public static class Validator
{

    static Regex ValidEmailRegex = CreateValidEmailRegex();

    /// <summary>
    /// Taken from http://haacked.com/archive/2007/08/21/i-knew-how-to-validate-an-email-address-until-i.aspx
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    private static Regex CreateValidEmailRegex()
    {
        string validEmailPattern = @"^(?!\.)(""([^""\r\\]|\\[""\r\\])*""|"
            + @"([-a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~]|(?<!\.)\.)*)(?<!\.)"
            + @"@[a-z0-9][\w\.-]*[a-z0-9]\.[a-z][a-z\.]*[a-z]$";

        return new Regex(validEmailPattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
    }

    internal static bool EmailIsValid(string emailAddress)
    {
        bool isValid = ValidEmailRegex.IsMatch(emailAddress);

        return isValid;
    }
}
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3  
@PeterKellner I ran it and it returned valid for the string jxxxx@linkedin.com. It seems strange you would guess it doesn't work instead of executing the code... –  David Silva Smith Jul 30 '13 at 22:28
1  
Just a small one, but I would use: return (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(emailAddress)) && ValidEmailRegex.IsMatch(emailAddress); –  Marc Nov 15 '13 at 14:16

Email address validation is not as easy as it might seem. It's actually theoretically impossible to fully validate an email address using just a regular expression.

Check out my blog post about it for a discussion on the subject and a F# implementation using FParsec. [/shameless_plug]

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1  
I liked you list of alternative approaches; very interesting. –  Luke Quinane Sep 2 '09 at 1:14
    
Interesting article. But seriously who's putting comments, and nested ones at that, in email addresses? –  Matthew Lock Sep 2 '09 at 3:44
2  
@matthew I don't know why the IETF has even allowed that, but it's possible, so a thorough validation has to take it into account. –  Mauricio Scheffer Sep 2 '09 at 12:21

.net 4.5 added System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.EmailAddressAttribute

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.componentmodel.dataannotations.emailaddressattribute.aspx

Using reflector, this is the Regex it uses internally:

private static Regex _regex = new Regex("^((([a-z]|\\d|[!#\\$%&'\\*\\+\\-\\/=\\?\\^_`{\\|}~]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])+(\\.([a-z]|\\d|[!#\\$%&'\\*\\+\\-\\/=\\?\\^_`{\\|}~]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])+)*)|((\\x22)((((\\x20|\\x09)*(\\x0d\\x0a))?(\\x20|\\x09)+)?(([\\x01-\\x08\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x1f\\x7f]|\\x21|[\\x23-\\x5b]|[\\x5d-\\x7e]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])|(\\\\([\\x01-\\x09\\x0b\\x0c\\x0d-\\x7f]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF]))))*(((\\x20|\\x09)*(\\x0d\\x0a))?(\\x20|\\x09)+)?(\\x22)))@((([a-z]|\\d|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])|(([a-z]|\\d|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])([a-z]|\\d|-|\\.|_|~|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])*([a-z]|\\d|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])))\\.)+(([a-z]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])|(([a-z]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])([a-z]|\\d|-|\\.|_|~|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])*([a-z]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])))\\.?$", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.ExplicitCapture | RegexOptions.Compiled);
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1  
Unfortunately the EmaillAddressAttribute allows Ñ which is not a valid character for email –  B Z Sep 6 '13 at 18:06
    
@BZ Yes it is. Why do you think it isn't? –  emodendroket Jul 30 at 18:31

To be honest, in production code, the best I do is check for an @ symbol.

I'm never in a place to be completely validating emails. You know how I see if it was really valid? If it got sent. If it didn't, it's bad, if it did, life's good. That's all I need to know.

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I find this regex to be a good trade off between checking for something more than just the @ mark, and excepting weird edge cases:

^[^@\s]+@[^@\s]+(\.[^@\s]+)+$

It will at least make you put something around the @ mark, and put at least a normal looking domain.

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If you really and I mean really want to know if an email address is valid...ask the mail exchanger to prove it, no regex needed. I can provide the code if requested.

General steps are as follows: 1. does email address have a domain name part? (index of @ > 0) 2. using a DNS query ask if domain has a mail exchanger 3. open tcp connection to mail exchanger 4. using the smtp protocol, open a message to the server using the email address as the reciever 5. parse the server's response. 6. quit the message if you made it this far, everything is good.

This is as you can imagine, very expensive time wise and relies on smtp, but it does work.

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Did you create fakes, stubs and/or mocks for those interfaces? –  Mark A Sep 20 '12 at 20:25
1  
That won't work. The smtp protocol to verify an email address has LONG been deprecated/not used. It is considered bad practice to enable that on mail servers since spammers use that functionality. –  Chad Grant Sep 9 '13 at 20:15

Generally speaking, a regular expression to validate email addresses is not an easy thing to come up with; at the time of this writing, the syntax of an email address must follow a relatively high number of standards and implementing all of them within a regular expression is practically unfeasible!

I highly suggest you to try our EmailVerify.NET, a mature .NET library which can validate email addresses following all of the current IETF standards (RFC 1123, RFC 2821, RFC 2822, RFC 3696, RFC 4291, RFC 5321 and RFC 5322), tests the related DNS records, checks if the target mailboxes can accept messages and can even tell if a given address is disposable or not.

Disclaimer: I am the lead developer for this component.

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I think the best way is as follow:

    public static bool emailIsValid(string email)
    {
        string expresion;
        expresion = "\\w+([-+.']\\w+)*@\\w+([-.]\\w+)*\\.\\w+([-.]\\w+)*";
        if (Regex.IsMatch(email, expresion))
        {
            if (Regex.Replace(email, expresion, string.Empty).Length == 0)
            {
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

You can have this static function in a general class.

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Do a search for a Regex to validate the email as a string - such as this

You could also use the Net libraries to verify the domain part, but that would be a bit more work.

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@dtb: IDNA is not supported at all by the regular expression this answer points to. If you need to use a mature email validation library that has full support for International Domain Names then please check out our EmailVerify.NET. –  Efran Cobisi Sep 22 '11 at 7:42
private static bool IsValidEmail(string emailAddress)
{
    const string validEmailPattern = @"^(?!\.)(""([^""\r\\]|\\[""\r\\])*""|"
                                     + @"([-a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~]|(?<!\.)\.)*)(?<!\.)"
                                     + @"@[a-z0-9][\w\.-]*[a-z0-9]\.[a-z][a-z\.]*[a-z]$";

    return new Regex(validEmailPattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase).IsMatch(emailAddress);
}
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Here's my answer -- Phil's solution fails for single letter domains like "someone@q.com". Believe it or not, that's used =) (goes to centurylink, for instance).

Phil's answer is also going to work only with PCRE standard... so C# will take it, but javascript is going to bomb. It's too complex for javascript. So you can't use Phil's solution for mvc validation attributes.

Here's my regex. It'll work nicely with MVC validation attributes.
- Everything before the @ is simplified, so that at least javascript will work. I'm okay relaxing validation here as long as exchange server doesn't give me a 5.1.3. - Everything after the @ is Phil's solution modified for single letter domains.

public const string EmailPattern =
        @"^\s*[\w\-\+_']+(\.[\w\-\+_']+)*\@[A-Za-z0-9]([\w\.-]*[A-Za-z0-9])?\.[A-Za-z][A-Za-z\.]*[A-Za-z]$";

For people suggesting using system.net.mail MailMessage(), that thing is WAY to flexible. Sure, C# will accept the email, but then exchange server will bomb with 5.1.3 runtime error as soon as you try to send the email.

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that seems to be the best most thoughtful / reasonable / realworld answer, thanks Ralph! –  Joe Blow Mar 24 at 19:03

Check email string is right format or wrong format by System.Text.RegularExpressions:

    public static bool IsValidEmailId(string InputEmail)
    {
        Regex regex = new Regex(@"^([\w\.\-]+)@([\w\-]+)((\.(\w){2,3})+)$");
        Match match = regex.Match(InputEmail);
        if (match.Success)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }

    protected void Email_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        String UserEmail = Email.Text;
        if (IsValidEmailId(UserEmail))
        {
            Label4.Text = "This email is correct formate";
        }
        else
        {
            Label4.Text = "This email isn't correct formate";
        }
    }
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Take a look at this URL for email regex examples. http://regular-expressions.mobi/email.html

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4  
I really don't think we need this link posted 3 times. –  Noon Silk Sep 2 '09 at 2:54
public static bool IsEmail(string strEmail)
{
    Regex rgxEmail = new Regex(@"^([a-zA-Z0-9_\-\.]+)@((\[[0-9]{1,3}" +
                               @"\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.)|(([a-zA-Z0-9\-]+\" +
                               @".)+))([a-zA-Z]{2,4}|[0-9]{1,3})(\]?)$");
    return rgxEmail.IsMatch(strEmail);
}
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  1. In a "try block" send a verification email.
  2. Make the user open the email and click a link verifying the email is real.

Until this process completes successfully, the email is assumed to be invalid.

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Some time back, I wrote an EmailAddressValidationAttribute that should properly validate pretty much any relatively normal email address of the form

local-part@domain

It's a System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.ValidationAttribute, so usage is really simple.

And, since digging through all the RFCs and errata and assembling all the bits required to properly enumerate all the rules is...tedious — at best! — I posted the source code for the validator in my answer to the question C# Email Address validation for the source code.

My validator isn't perfect by any stretch of the imagination, though Just for starters, it doesn't have any built-in support for emitting client-side javascript validation, though it wouldn't be too difficult to add that in. From my answer above:

Here's the validation attribute I wrote. It validates pretty much every "raw" email address, that is those of the form local-part@domain. It doesn't support any of the other, more...creative constructs that the RFCs allow (this list is not comprehensive by any means):

  • comments (e.g., jsmith@whizbang.com (work))
  • quoted strings (escaped text, to allow characters not allowed in an atom)
  • domain literals (e.g. foo@[123.45.67.012])
  • bang-paths (aka source routing)
  • angle addresses (e.g. John Smith <jsmith@whizbang.com>)
  • folding whitespace
  • double-byte characters in either local-part or domain (7-bit ASCII only).
  • etc.

It should accept almost any email address that can be expressed thusly

  • foo.bar@bazbat.com

without requiring the use of quotes ("), angle brackets ('<>') or square brackets ([]).

No attempt is made to validate that the rightmost dns label in the domain is a valid TLD (top-level domain). That is because the list of TLDs is far larger now than the "big 6" (.com, .edu, .gov, .mil, .net, .org) plus 2-letter ISO country codes. ICANN actually updates the TLD list daily, though I suspect that the list doesn't actually change daily. Further, [ICANN just approved a big expansion of the generic TLD namespace][2]). And some email addresses don't have what you'd recognize as a TLD (did you know that postmaster@. is theoretically valid and mailable? Mail to that address should get delivered to the postmaster of the DNS root zone.)

Extending the regular expression to support domain literals shouldn't be too difficult.

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/Using the Internal Regex used in creating the "new EmailAddressAttribute();" component in .Net4.5 >>> using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations; //To Validate an Email Address......Tested and Working.

public bool IsEmail(string email)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(email))
    {   return false;  }
    try
    {
        Regex _regex = new Regex("^((([a-z]|\\d|[!#\\$%&'\\*\\+\\-\\/=\\?\\^_`{\\|}~]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])" +
                "+(\\.([a-z]|\\d|[!#\\$%&'\\*\\+\\-\\/=\\?\\^_`{\\|}~]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])+)*)|((\\x22)" +
                "((((\\x20|\\x09)*(\\x0d\\x0a))?(\\x20|\\x09)+)?(([\\x01-\\x08\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x1f\\x7f]|\\x21|[\\x23-\\x5b]|[\\x5d-\\x7e]|" +
                "[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])|(\\\\([\\x01-\\x09\\x0b\\x0c\\x0d-\\x7f]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\u" +
                "FDF0-\\uFFEF]))))*(((\\x20|\\x09)*(\\x0d\\x0a))?(\\x20|\\x09)+)?(\\x22)))@((([a-z]|\\d|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])|" +
                "(([a-z]|\\d|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])([a-z]|\\d|-|\\.|_|~|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])*([a-z]|\\d|" +
                "[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])))\\.)+(([a-z]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])|(([a-z]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900" +
                "-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])([a-z]|\\d|-|\\.|_|~|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFFEF])*([a-z]|[\\u00A0-\\uD7FF\\uF900-\\uFDCF\\uFDF0-\\uFF" +
                "EF])))\\.?$", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.ExplicitCapture | RegexOptions.Compiled);
        return _regex.IsMatch(email);
    }
    catch (RegexMatchTimeoutException)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

Also, You can use this:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/01escwtf(v=vs.110).aspx

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