Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently working with a WCF service that is supposed to spawn a new task to be run asynchronously on a server (there are db queries etc that need to take place). It is possible (and very likely) that the response is sent back to client before the new task is finished warranting the client to close. At this point the dependencies that were available during creation of the task will no longer be available. I am still in need of some of the dependencies in order to complete the task.

How would I want to go about making sure the dependencies required for the new task are still alive?

I included some very dumbed down code to give a basic example.

public string SubmitData(
            User user, Request request)
        {
            History history = m_history.CreateRequest(user);

            //New task which will do an import of data into the DB.
           Task.Factory.StartNew( () => 
               Import( user, request, history ) ); 

           /*Return some sort of response back to user so they're not waiting for 
           *the long process to complete           
           */
           return "Response";
        }

        private void Import(
            User user,
            Request request,
            History history)
        {
            var response = Import(
                user, request, history);
            m_history.Save(history, response );
        }
share|improve this question
    
Do clients do anything with the response? –  Andy B Dec 1 '12 at 12:17
    
Yes. They'ed get some data back from the response such that they can send a request at a later time to see the results of the import. –  Luke G Dec 3 '12 at 14:08
    
Sample code is invalid, and does not really illustrate the issue. Question leaves a lot to the reader, namely you make no mention of autofac's deterministic disposal and that you must have your scopes and lifetimes setup so that relevant dependencies are freed after this call. –  vossad01 Dec 3 '12 at 16:38
    
@vossad1: Still, I think this may be the way newcomers to Autofac view problems with disposal, before they understand how to manipuate resolution scope and lifetime using the various relationship types. Along with your answer, this question is certainly worthwhile. Indeed, mostly because of the answer, but still. –  Marc L. Dec 5 '12 at 3:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You will need to take responsibility for disposing of the dependencies yourself. Since you are using autofac, your the simplest solution is likely to used Owned<T>

See documentation: Owned Instances

Here is roughly I would factor your code to utilize Owned<T>, though there are lots of possibilities:

    private Func<Owned<Importer>> importerFactory = //Constructor Injected.

    public string SubmitData(
        User user, Request request)
    {
        History history = m_history.CreateRequest(user);

        //New task which will do an import of data into the DB.
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                using (var importer = importerFactory())
                {
                    importer.Value.Import(user, request, history);
                }
            });

        /*Return some sort of response back to user so they're not waiting for 
       *the long process to complete           
       */
        return "Response";
    }

    public class Importer
    {
        //m_history ...

        public void Import(
            User user,
            Request request,
            History history)
        {
            var response = Import(user, request, history);
            m_history.Save(history, response);
        }
    }

Judging from your question. You may benefit from some additional reading on Autofac, lifetime, and deterministic disposal.

Instance Scope

Lifetime Primer

Deterministic Disposal

Once you more firmly understand how autofac works, you will realize your problem is actually more general. Namely, how to ensure proper disposal of shared objects used by in Tasks. In my code above, I solved the issue by not sharing the object, and making the task handle disposal.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.