Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently writing a program that has a function that prints a linked list in reverse.

I need to print the reverse of what this code prints using the iterative approach.

EDIT: It is a single linked list.

Thanks in advance.

void print_backward_iteration(NODE *ptr)
{
  NODE *last, *current;

  last = NULL;

  printf("\n");

  while (ptr != last)
    {
      current = ptr;

      while (current -> next != last)
    {
      current= current -> next;
    }

      printf("%d  ", current -> data);
      last = current;
    }

    printf("\n");

}

Here is my complete code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

/* declaration of structure */
typedef struct node
{
  int data;
  struct node *next;
} NODE;

/* declaration of functions */
NODE* insert_node(NODE *ptr, NODE *new);
NODE* find_node(NODE *ptr, int n);
NODE* delete_node(NODE *ptr, int n, int *success_flag_ptr);
void print_backward_iteration(NODE *ptr);
void print_backward_recursion(NODE *ptr);

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  int choice, x, flag_success;
  NODE *ptr, *new, *result;

  ptr = NULL;

  do
    {

      printf("\n1.\tInsert Integer into linked list\n");
      printf("2.\tFind integer in linked list\n");
      printf("3.\tDelete integer from linked list\n");
      printf("4.\tPrint out integers backward using the iterative strategy\n");
      printf("5.\tPrint out integers backward using the recursive strategy\n");
      printf("6.\tQuit\n");
      printf("\nEnter 1,2,3,4,5, or 6: ");
      scanf("%d", &choice);

      switch(choice)
    {
    case 1:

      printf("\nPlease enter an integer: ");
      scanf("%d", &x);
      new = (NODE *)malloc(sizeof(NODE));
      new->data = x;
      ptr = insert_node(ptr, new);
      printf("\nNode Inserted with value of %d.\n", ptr->data);
      break;

    case 2:

      printf("\nPlease enter an integer: ");
      scanf("%d", &x);
      result = find_node(ptr, x);

      if (result == NULL)
        {
          printf("\nValue could not be found.\n");
        }
      else
        {
          printf("\nValue %d was found.\n", x);
        }

      break;

    case 3:
      printf("\nPlease enter an integer: ");
      scanf("%d", &x);
      ptr = delete_node(ptr, x, &flag_success);

        if (result == NULL)
        {
          printf("\nValue could not be found.\n");
        }
      else
        {
          printf("\nValue %d was deleted.\n", x);
        }

      break;

    case 4:

      print_backward_iteration(ptr);
      break;

    case 5:

      printf("\n");
      print_backward_recursion(ptr);
      printf("\n");

      break;

    case 6:
      printf("\nThank you for using this program.\n");
    break;

    default:
      printf("\nInvalid Choice. Please try again.\n");
      break;

    }
    }
  while (choice != 6);

  printf("\n*** End of Program ***\n");
  return 0;
}

/* definition of function insert_node */
NODE* insert_node(NODE *ptr, NODE *new)
{

 new -> next = ptr;
 return new;

}

/* definition of function find_node */
NODE* find_node(NODE *ptr, int n)
{

  while (ptr != NULL)
    {
      if (ptr->data == n)  
    {
      return ptr;
    }
      else
    {
      ptr = ptr->next;
    }
    }
  return NULL;
  }

/* definition of function delete_node */
NODE* delete_node(NODE *ptr, int n, int *success_flag_ptr)
{
   NODE *temp = NULL;

   if(ptr == NULL)
     {
       *success_flag_ptr = 0;
       return NULL;
     }

   if(ptr -> data == n)
     {     
       temp = ptr->next;  
       free(ptr);         
       *success_flag_ptr = 1;
       return temp;
    }
   else
      ptr->next = delete_node(ptr->next,n,success_flag_ptr); 

      return ptr;
}

/* definition of function print_backward_iteration */
void print_backward_iteration(NODE *ptr)
{
  NODE *last, *current;

  last = NULL;

  printf("\n");

  while (ptr != last)
    {
      current = ptr;

      while (current != last)
    {
      current =  current -> next;
    }

      printf("%d  ", current -> data);
      last = current -> next;
    }

    printf("\n");

}

/* definition of function print_backward_recursion */
void print_backward_recursion(NODE *ptr)
{
  NODE *last, *current;

  last = NULL;

  while (ptr != last)
      {
    current = ptr;
    printf("%d  ", current -> data);
    print_backward_recursion(current -> next);
    last = current;
      }

}
share|improve this question
    
Right before I delete my answer I have to ask: how do you have code to print a list using a nested while-loop in an O(N^2) algorithm iteratively, and a function that prints it in reverse recursively, and yet did not have the code to walk the list, beginning to end, in regular order of head-to-tail? Hmmm... –  WhozCraig Dec 1 '12 at 5:48
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
void print_Linked_List_iteration(NODE *ptr)
{

  printf("\n");

  while (ptr != NULL)
  {

      printf("%d  ", ptr->data);
      ptr = ptr->next;
  }

  printf("\n");

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you VERY much! –  Puzzledplane Dec 1 '12 at 4:51
    
Thanks to you 2 :) for accepting my answer... –  Adeel Ahmed Dec 1 '12 at 4:55
add comment

UPDATE - I'm keeping the code below on the off-chance someone looking to actually reverse-print a linked list sans-recursion using any of the methods provided can get some kinda of use out of them. In the meantime, the OP's real question was effectively:

"How to I print a linked list in head-to-tail order?"

Who saw that coming? Anyway,

void print_node_list(const NODE* p)
{
    printf("\n");
    for (;p;printf("%d ",p->data),p=p->next);
    printf("\n");
}

Yeah, it was that simple.


Now-Near-Worthless Reverse-Print Discussion

Complying with your requirement of this being an iterative solution, and more importantly, assuming your lists order unchanged after this operation is complete, you can either:

  1. Manage a node pointer stack in your iteration, pushing pointers as you single-pass the list traveral, then popping pointers off the stack to print the reverse. Requires two passes (one through the list, one through the stack). There are multiple options for managing such a stack; two are presented below.

  2. Perform a simple reverse/print/reverse. Requires three passes (one for the reverse, one for the print, and one for the undo-reverse).

The former of these offers the advantage of keeping the list constant (no node-reversals are done) at the price of the space required to manage the stack. The latter of these offers the benefit of no additional space requirements, but at the cost of three-passes on the list, and requiring the list be allowed to be modified, though temporarily.

Which you choose is up to you.

Local Stack Implementation: (2 passes, 2*N*sizeof(pointer) space)

void print_reverse_node_list(const NODE* head)
{
    struct stnode
    {
        struct stnode* next;
        const NODE* node;
    } *st = NULL;

    while (head)
    {
        struct stnode* p = malloc(sizeof(*p));
        if (p)
        {
            p->next = st;
            p->node = head;
            st = p;
            head = head->next;
        }
        else
        {
            perror("Could not allocate space for reverse-print.");
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
    }

    // walks stack, popping off nodes and printing them.
    printf("\n");
    while (st)
    {
        struct stnode* p = st;
        st = st->next;
        printf("%d ", p->node->data);
        free(p);
    }
    printf("\n");
}

Another Local Stack Implementation (2-passes, N*sizeof(pointer) space)

void print_reverse_node_list(const NODE* head)
{
    NODE const **ar = NULL;
    size_t i=0;
    while (head)
    {
        // reallocate pointer array
        NODE const **tmp = realloc(ar, ++i * sizeof(*tmp));
        if (tmp)
        {
            ar = tmp;           // remember new array
            ar[i-1] = head;     // last index gets the ptr
            head = head->next;  // advance to next node
        }
        else
        {
            perror("Could not allocate space for reverse-print.");
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
    }

    // print nodes from [i-1] to [0]
    printf("\n");
    for (; i!=0; printf("%d ", ar[--i]->data));
    printf("\n");
    // don't forget to release the block (NULL is ok)
    free(ar);
}

Reverse/Print/Reverse Implementation: (3 passes, no additional space)

// print a node list.
void print_node_list(const NODE* p)
{
    printf("\n");
    for (;p;printf("%d ",p->data),p=p->next);
    printf("\n");
}

// reverses a linked list in-place.
void reverse_node_list(NODE **headp)
{
    if (!headp || !*headp)
        return;

    NODE *ptr = *headp, *next = NULL, *prev = NULL;
    while (ptr)
    {
        next = ptr->next;      // remember next node (1)
        ptr->next = prev;      // wire next to prev
        prev = ptr;            // set prev to current
        ptr = next;            // move to remembered next (see 1)
    }

    *headp = prev;
}

void print_reverse_node_list(NODE* head)
{
    reverse_node_list(&head);
    print_node_list(head);
    reverse_node_list(&head);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

The answer depends on the nature of the list:

  • If this is a doubly-linked list, simply iterate in reverse.

  • If this is a singly-linked list, you are going to have to maintain a stack yourself, basically doing what a recursive solution would do, but iteratively. This is essentially the same as making a reverse copy of the list (this can be done iteratively), and printing the copy.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm assuming the list is singly linked because otherwise the problem would be trivial. I would make a copy of the list in reverse order then print that. Basically;

 void print_reverse_iteration(NODE *ptr)
 {
        NODE *previous = head;
        NODE *current = head;
        bool trailing = false; //used to ensure we're on head->next before we begin moving prev
        last = NULL;

        printf("\n");

        while (current->next != NULL)
        {
               current->next = previous;
               if (trailing)
                   previous = previous->next;
               else
               {
                   trailing = true;
                   current->next = NULL; // this is now the end of the list so we need to set it's next pointer to null to ensure we halt in other methods that rely on node->next == NULL
                }
               current = current->next
         }

         //the list is now in reverse order. print it with your regular print method.
         normalPrint(current);
        // current is the head of this temporary list so pass it current.    

    }
share|improve this answer
    
Why traverse the same list twice (once to build the reverse and once to print) for a simple print operation? –  Mihai Stancu Nov 30 '12 at 23:26
    
@MihaiStancu I'm pretty sure that's the only way to do it without creating a stack or using recursion. And printing a singly linked list in reverse order without recursion is not a simple operation. –  evanmcdonnal Nov 30 '12 at 23:27
    
@MihaiStancu It's funny you criticize this answer but upvote an answer that ignores the question entirely. –  evanmcdonnal Nov 30 '12 at 23:33
    
I upvoted because it gave me clarity on the problem. I didn't downvote your answer. I was trying to offer constructive criticism. Let's not take it any further. –  Mihai Stancu Nov 30 '12 at 23:35
    
I'd go with the pointer stack as per WhozCraig's answer, creating a secondary reversed list has the disadvantages of both approaches, requires extra space and extra time. –  Mihai Stancu Nov 30 '12 at 23:41
show 3 more comments

Ugly way to do it, abusing the function call stack:

void print_reverse_iteration(NODE *ptr)
{
    if (ptr != NULL) 
    {
        print_reverse_iteration( ptr->next);
        printf( "%d  ", ptr->data);
    }
}

print_reverse_iteration( head);
puts( "");

Will only work for short lists that don't overflow the stack.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, missed that requirement... I'll update my solution to be, "if you need to walk your list in reverse, it should be a doubly-linked list". %-) –  tomlogic Dec 1 '12 at 0:29
add comment
    void PrintBackwards (node * head)
     {
       if(head)
        {
          PrintBackwards(head->next);
          printf("%d",head->data);
        }
       return;
      }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.