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I'm writting a program that simplifies polynimials, only addition and multiplication for now.

I've been slamming my head agains the keyboard for hours now and figure it was time to ask for some help.

(defun simplify (lis)
    (if (eq (car lis) '+)
        (cons '+ (simplify-addition (cdr lis)))
        (if (eq (car lis) '*)
            (cons '* (simplify-multiplication (cdr lis))) 
        )
    )
)
(defun simplify-addition (lis)
    (if (not (null lis))
        (if (listp (car lis))
            (list (simplify (car lis)) (simplify-addition (cdr lis)))
            (if (numberp (car lis))
                (if (eq (car lis) 0)
                    (simplify-addition (cdr lis))
                    (if (null (cdr lis))
                        lis
                        (cons (car lis) (simplify-addition (cdr lis)))
                    )
                )
                (if (eq (car lis) '+)
                    (list (car lis) (simplify-addition (cdr lis)))
                    (if (eq (car lis) '*)
                        (list (car lis) (simplify-addition (cdr lis)))
                        lis
                    )
                )
            )
        )
    )
)

(defun simplify-multiplication (lis)
    (if (not (null lis))
        (if (listp (car lis))
            (if (find 0 (car lis))
                0
                (list (simplify (car lis)) (simplify-multiplication (cdr lis)))
            )
            (if (numberp (car lis))
                (if (null (cdr lis))
                    lis
                    (cons (car lis) (simplify-multiplication (cdr lis)))
                )
                (if (eq (car lis) '+)
                    (list (car lis) (simplify-multiplication (cdr lis)))
                    (if (eq (car lis) '*)
                        (list (car lis) (simplify-multiplication (cdr lis)))
                        lis
                    )
                )
            )
        )
    )
)

This is what should happen:

(simplify ‘(+  x  ( + 0 3 )  ( * 1 5 )  ( * ( * x  y  z ) 0 )  ))  -->  ( + x 3 5 )
(simplify ‘(* (+ 6  0)  (* 1 6 2)))  -------------------------------->  (* 6 (* 6 2))

but instead i either get the same polynomial i sent in, or something completely off

EDIT: The simplification that i need is to remove 0 from additions, so that:

(+ 3 0)   --> 3
(+ 4 0 6) --> (+ 4 6)

and the multiplication with zero are removed

(* 6 0 7) --> 0 
share|improve this question
    
+1 for your indentation style, -1 for not saying what results you get –  melpomene Dec 1 '12 at 1:18
    
So you are only supposed to simplify one level? I ask because in your second example, the result could be simplified to 72, but you only go until (* 6 (* 6 2)) –  RonaldBarzell Dec 1 '12 at 1:31
    
i updated the question with more specific of what the function should do. –  cocopuffs Dec 1 '12 at 1:39
1  
Please learn how to format Lisp code properly. –  danlei Dec 1 '12 at 4:16

2 Answers 2

First you might want to improve your coding style a bit to make it readable.

  • don't put parentheses on their own lines. This just wastes space and doesn't help at all.

  • don't use CAR and CDR in domain specific code. The domain is mathematics. You use expressions (operator arg1 arg2). Instead using CAR and CDR define functions OPERATOR and ARGUMENTS and use them.

  • use CASE, COND and other multiway conditional expressions, instead of nested IF - where useful.

  • try to extract the traversal of data structures from domain code. Use higher order functions instead of recursion (MAP, REDUCE, ...).

Example:

Some basic domain functions:

(defun operator (expression)
  (first expression))

(defun arguments (expression)
  (rest expression))

(defun make-expression (operator arguments)
  (if (= (length arguments) 1)
      (first arguments)
    (cons operator arguments)))

(defun is-zero? (expression)
  (and (numberp expression)
       (= expression 0)))

Now the simplifications:

(defun simplify (expression)
  (if (atom expression)
      expression
    (case (operator expression)
      (+ (make-expression '+ (simplify-addition       (arguments expression))))
      (* (make-expression '* (simplify-multiplication (arguments expression)))))))

(defun simplify-addition (expressions)
  (remove-if #'is-zero?
             (mapcar #'simplify
                     (remove-if #'is-zero? expressions))))

(defun simplify-multiplication (expressions)
  (if (member-if #'is-zero? expressions)
      (list 0)
    (let ((expressions1 (mapcar #'simplify expressions)))
      (if (member-if #'is-zero? expressions1)
          (list 0)
        expressions1))))

See, how much more readable the code is? No more CAR, LIS, CDR. The intention of the recursive invocations is also much clearer to understand.

It still not optimal, but it should get you going.

share|improve this answer

I've only looked at simplify-multiplication but there are a number of issues here.

On a general note, you want to recursively simplify first, then check for specific constants afterwards. (A post-order traversal, I guess.)

Second, I don't see you checking for 1 anywhere so I don't see how (* 1 5) ==> 5 is supposed to work.

Third, let's step through (simplify '(* (+ 2 0) 3)) for a bit:

(defun simplify-multiplication (lis)
; lis = '((+ 2 0) 3)
    (if (not (null lis))
    ; ==> t
        (if (listp (car lis))
        ; (car lis) = '(+ 2 0), so (listp '(+ 2 0)) ==> t
            (if (find 0 (car lis))
            ; succeeds because '(+ 2 0) contains 0
            ; this is completely wrong! you're not supposed to check sublists of lis
                0
                ; ... yeah, you just returned 0 just because there was a 0 *somewhere*
                (list (simplify (car lis)) (simplify-multiplication (cdr lis)))
            )
            ...

Or (simplify '(* 0 2)):

(defun simplify-multiplication (lis)
; lis = '(0 2)
    (if (not (null lis))
    ; ==> t
        (if (listp (car lis))
        ; (car lis) = 0, so (listp 0) ==> nil
            (if (find 0 (car lis))
                0
                (list (simplify (car lis)) (simplify-multiplication (cdr lis)))
            )
            (if (numberp (car lis))
            ; (numberp 0) ==> t
                (if (null (cdr lis))
                ; (cdr lis) = '(2), so (null '(2)) ==> nil
                    lis
                    (cons (car lis) (simplify-multiplication (cdr lis)))
                    ; ... wait, what?
                    ; you're just recursively walking through the list without
                    ; checking what numbers you actually got. this won't simplify
                    ; anything.
                )
                (if (eq (car lis) '+)
                ; what is this branch for? it can only succeed if you have code of the form
                ;   (* 1 + 2)
                ; which is a syntax error
                    (list (car lis) (simplify-multiplication (cdr lis)))
                    (if (eq (car lis) '*)
                    ; this branch is for code like (* * *). huh???
                        (list (car lis) (simplify-multiplication (cdr lis)))
                        lis
                    )
                )
            )
        )
    )
)
share|improve this answer
    
if you had read the entire thing, you would see that when it encounters an element that is a list, it sends it back to the simplify function which reads the first character (+ or ) and then sends it to the corresponding function, so in your first example once it got the first element, the list, it would see that is an addition and send it there. Also in the multiplication function i do want to return 0 if there is a zero anywhere on that list because ( 0 x) --> 0 –  cocopuffs Dec 1 '12 at 2:05
    
If you had read my comments, you would've seen that it does not go back to simplify in my example. I agree that you do want to return 0 if there is a 0 among the arguments, but the code doesn't do that. Instead it returns 0 if one of the arguments is another list and that inner list contains 0. –  melpomene Dec 1 '12 at 2:13
    
sorry if my comment sounded rude, not my intention, your comment was very helpful and lead me to identify some of my mistakes. –  cocopuffs Dec 1 '12 at 4:33

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