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I'm the author of a psp emulator made in C#.

I'm generating lots of "DynamicMethod" using ILGenerator. I'm converting assembly code into an AST, and then generating IL code and building that DynamicMethod. I'm doing this in another thread, so I can generate new methods while the program is executing others so it can run smoothly.

My problem is that the native code generation is lazy, so the machine code is generated when the function is called, not when the IL is generated. So it generates in the program executing thread, native code generation is prettly slow as it is the asm->ast->il step.

I have tried the Marshal.Prelink method that it is suposed to generate the machine code before executing the function. It does work on Mono, but it doesn't work on MS .NET.

Marshal.Prelink(MethodInfo);

Is there a way of prelinking a DynamicMethod on MS .NET?

I thought adding a boolean parameter to the function that if set, exits the function immediately so no code is actually executed. I could "prelink" that way, but I think that's a nasty solution I want to avoid.

Any idea?

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2 Answers 2

I found someone saying that creating a delegate to the dynamic method would force JIT:

Create a delegate whose target is the method. What's the point of this?

This one sounds promising too:

Thread jitter = new Thread(() =>
{
  foreach (var type in Assembly.Load("MyHavyAssembly, Version=1.8.2008.8," + 
           " Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=8744b20f8da049e3").GetTypes())
  {
    foreach (var method in type.GetMethods(BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly | 
                        BindingFlags.NonPublic | 
                        BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance | 
                        BindingFlags.Static))
    {
      System.Runtime.CompilerServices.RuntimeHelpers.PrepareMethod(method.MethodHandle);
    }
  }
});
jitter.Priority = ThreadPriority.Lowest;
jitter.Start();
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1  
I really don't understand why would creating a delegate force JIT. And the second method is supposed to be used with CERs (constrained execution regions), not sure that's the right way either. –  svick Dec 1 '12 at 12:41

Reading the information as to why its not working the MSDN documentation says the following::

Calling Prelink on a method outside of platform invoke has no effect.

I'm quiet convinced that if you use the restrictedskipverification or skipverification it will jit the method.

Although if I'm wrong your short circuiting idea isn't a bad one.

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