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I just went through this MDN tutorial regarding the DOM. Under the final section "Testing the DOM API" the following code is presented:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>DOM Tests</title>
    <script type="application/javascript">
    function setBodyAttr(attr,value){
    if (document.body) eval('document.body.'+attr+'="'+value+'"');
    else notSupported();
    }
    </script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div style="margin: .5in; height: 400;">
      <p><b><tt>text</tt>color</b></p>
      <form>
        <select onChange="setBodyAttr('text',
        this.options[this.selectedIndex].value);">
          <option value="black">black
          <option value="darkblue">darkblue
        </select>
        <p><b><tt>bgColor</tt></b></p>
        <select onChange="setBodyAttr('bgColor',
        this.options[this.selectedIndex].value);">
          <option value="white">white
          <option value="lightgrey">gray
        </select>
        <p><b><tt>link</tt></b></p>
        <select onChange="setBodyAttr('link',
        this.options[this.selectedIndex].value);">
          <option value="blue">blue
          <option value="green">green
        </select>  <small>
        <a href="http://www.brownhen.com/dom_api_top.html" id="sample">
        (sample link)</a></small><br>
      </form>
      <form>
        <input type="button" value="version" onclick="ver()" />
      </form>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

Everything works as expected, except for the link color: under Chrome a change in link color only gets applied once you change the text color (i.e., the first property). Shouldn't all changes be immediate?

Thanks in advance.

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Strange behaviour with the behaviour of link colours could be related to history sniffing defences: krebsonsecurity.com/2010/12/… –  Douglas Dec 1 '12 at 1:55
2  
Wow. Normally the MDN is my goto resource for API docs on JavaScript, but this tutorial is a complete disaster. I recommend you forget everything this tutorial has said - it's basically a tutorial on bad practices. Using eval and inline javascript are unsecure, unreadable, and annoying practices. I recommend reading a different tutorial. –  netpoetica Dec 1 '12 at 1:56
    
Thanks, Keith. I guess it shows I'm an absolute beginner... What would you recommend as a solid discussion of the DOM for beginners? (Maybe I shouldn't worry too much about the DOM per se, since it tends to be covered in JS tutorials.) –  eze Dec 1 '12 at 2:11
1  
This is a great starting point for JS in general - net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/javascript-ajax/… There is a whole part (I think part 5) on events in that series, which will get you involved in building a cross browser event library so you can test some things out. I wasn't able to find a really good onChange-specific tutorial anywhere, but there are a lot of question about it here on stack that might be able to serve as a good example –  netpoetica Dec 1 '12 at 2:15
    
Thanks again, Keith! –  eze Dec 1 '12 at 12:35
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That just isn't the right way to change the color of links on a page (should be done with CSS), and the body.link attribute was deprecated in HTML version 4 (http://www.w3schools.com/tags/att_body_link.asp). I can't be 100% positive, but I would say the reason it doesn't work is because Chrome is a modern browser adopting web standards - the body.link attribute is not a standard.

share|improve this answer
    
If anybody is curious, I "insisted" on this example once again, but as Keith pointed out this leads to archaic markup such as <body text="darkblue" bgcolor="white" link="blue">. This site lists deprecated HTML tags and attributes. –  eze Dec 16 '12 at 21:54
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