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I'm trying to figure out how to write a very fast is_iequal function, optimized for ASCII, to compare if two characters are equal in a case-insensitive manner.

The ultimate goal is for this functor to be used with boost::algorithm::starts_with, etc.

So far my attempt has produced the following:

#include <locale>
unsigned long fast_rand(void);

template<class Ch> struct is_iequal
{
    std::ctype<Ch> const &ctype;
    is_iequal(std::ctype<Ch> const &ctype) : ctype(ctype) { }
    bool operator()(Ch const c1, Ch const c2) const
    {
        return c1 == c2 ||
            ('a' <= c1 && c1 <= 'z' && c1 - 'a' == c2 - 'A') ||
            ('A' <= c1 && c1 <= 'Z' && c1 - 'A' == c2 - 'a') ||
            !(c1 <= '\x7F' && c2 <= '\x7F') &&
            ctype.toupper(c1) == ctype.toupper(c2);
    }
};

int main()
{
    size_t const N = 1 << 26;
    typedef wchar_t TCHAR;
    std::locale loc;
    std::ctype<TCHAR> const &ctype = std::use_facet<std::ctype<TCHAR> >(loc);
    is_iequal<TCHAR> const is_iequal(ctype);  // Functor

    TCHAR *s1 = new TCHAR[N], *s2 = new TCHAR[N];
    for (size_t i = 0; i < N; i++) { s1[i] = fast_rand() & 0x7F; }
    for (size_t i = 0; i < N; i++) { s2[i] = fast_rand() & 0x7F; }

    bool dummy = false;
    clock_t start = clock();
    for (size_t i = 0; i < N; i++) { dummy ^= is_iequal(s1[i], s2[i]); }
    printf("%u ms\n", (clock() - start) * 1000 / CLOCKS_PER_SEC, dummy);
}

unsigned long fast_rand(void)  // Fast RNG for testing (xorshf96)
{
    static unsigned long x = 123456789, y = 362436069, z = 521288629;

    x ^= x << 16;
    x ^= x >> 5;
    x ^= x << 1;

    unsigned long t = x;
    x = y;
    y = z;
    z = t ^ x ^ y;

    return z;
}

which, on my computer, runs in 584 ms (VC++ 2011 x64).

It's still a bit too slow for my application though -- it's still the bottleneck in my actual program, which causes a slight UI delay I'd like to get rid of if possible.

What can I do to optimize is_iequals further, without changing its interface?


Note: Yes, I am aware of the various problems with this code (UTF-16 handling, pedantic C++ issues with implicit casting to/from char, etc...) but they're irrelevant to my goal here so I'm completely ignoring them for the time being.

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2  
This is something that will love vectorization. –  Mysticial Dec 1 '12 at 3:18
    
@Mysticial: Yup! SIMD is indeed perfect for this, but it doesn't let me use this with Boost's algorithms, which is more important for me at the moment... so I'm wondering if there's anything I can do within the constraints of is_iequals's interface that can still make it faster. –  Mehrdad Dec 1 '12 at 3:20
    
Oh btw, upper and lower case letters differ by only 1 bit. –  Mysticial Dec 1 '12 at 3:20
    
@Mysticial: Oh really?! I didn't know that... hmm how would I take advantage of that? –  Mehrdad Dec 1 '12 at 3:21
    
Just look at any ascii table and you'll see. I forgot which bit it is. But you can mask out that bit and do a direct compare. You'll still have to handle the non-alphabetical cases though. –  Mysticial Dec 1 '12 at 3:22
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Consider inlining toLower for c<127 - memory cost will be small enough to be in cache but speed may be better:

char localToLow[128] =....
return c1 < 127 && c2 < 127 ? localToLow[c1]==localToLow[c2] :
    ctype.toupper(c1) == ctype.toupper(c2);

(< 127 can be replaced with ((c1 | c2) & ~127 ) :) )

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Seems to have almost exactly the same speed as what I ended up doing (below), thanks! –  Mehrdad Dec 1 '12 at 3:54
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@Mysticial's comment together with a little bit of tweaking really seemed to help.

First I tried this:

template<class Ch>
struct is_iequal
{
    std::ctype<Ch> const &ctype;
    is_iequal(std::ctype<Ch> const &ctype) : ctype(ctype) { }
    bool operator()(Ch const a, Ch const b) const
    {
        return a == b ||
            ('a' <= a && a <= 'z' || 'A' <= a && a <= 'Z') &&
            (a & ~('a' - 'A')) == (b & ~('a' - 'A')) ||
            a > SCHAR_MAX && b > SCHAR_MAX &&
            ctype.toupper(a) == ctype.toupper(b);
    }
};

which didn't help much, but then I thought, hey, why not swap the two sides of the &&?

template<class Ch>
struct is_iequal
{
    std::ctype<Ch> const &ctype;
    is_iequal(std::ctype<Ch> const &ctype) : ctype(ctype) { }
    bool operator()(Ch const a, Ch const b) const
    {
        return a == b ||
            (a & ~('a' - 'A')) == (b & ~('a' - 'A')) &&
            ('a' <= a && a <= 'z' || 'A' <= a && a <= 'Z') ||
            a > SCHAR_MAX && b > SCHAR_MAX &&
            ctype.toupper(a) == ctype.toupper(b);
    }
};

That brought it down to 138 ms!

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128x128 lookup table. Always do this lookup (mask the inputs).

That reduces your branches to one (do you call to upper?). Calculate that one without doing && or || - use branchless logic.

Maybe make the table a whole byte squared. Also try using a tighter lookup table where you extract the lookup with bit twiddling, and more twiddling to determine if it is thrown out and == used instead. (a&b)|(c&~b) is b?a:c without a branch.

And branch prediction failures suck.

Pick table size after experimenting and testing.

So my table is bool equal[128][128] = {…} -- not a lookup then an equal, but just a lookup.

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I'm getting faster results if I replace:

('a' <= a && a <= 'z' || 'A' <= a && a <= 'Z') ||

...from your answer with:

(unsigned char)((a & 0x20) - 'A') < 26 ||

The a & 0x20 will collapse lower to upper case (it will also affect some other characters, but we'll screen them out in a second). Subtracting 'A' then produces a negative number if the collapsed value is less than A. Converting to unsigned reduces that modulo UCHAR_MAX (typically 255) so the negative numbers become large positive numbers. Then with only one test, we find whether that started out as an upper- or lower-case letter.

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