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This stored procedure is giving me an error due to truncation on the customerAddress.

Here is my code:

CREATE PROCEDURE insertNewCustomer 
-- Add the parameters for the stored procedure here
@customerId char(8), 
@customerName varChar(20),
@customerAddress varChar(18),
@zipCode integer
AS
BEGIN
-- SET NOCOUNT ON added to prevent extra result sets from
-- interfering with SELECT statements.
SET NOCOUNT ON;

-- Insert statements for procedure here
INSERT INTO customer (customerId, customerName, customerAddress, zipCode)
VALUES ('Z0999999', 'Larisa Preiser', '3801 W. Temple Avenue', '92335')
END
GO

EXEC insertNewCustomer 1, '', '', 0

Any ideas on how to make it truncate it?

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Can you show use how you're testing and what the results are before and after –  Preet Sangha Dec 1 '12 at 3:36
    
Have you executed the procedure using the EXEC statement? –  dctucker Dec 1 '12 at 3:37
    
Yes it says the command completed successfully. Also the results are no rows both times! –  DDDD Dec 1 '12 at 3:44
    
@dctucker No I have not put any EXEC anywhere nor know what that is. –  DDDD Dec 1 '12 at 3:45
    
@JonathanWood I have been writing a query on my customer table to see if the new customer appears. –  DDDD Dec 1 '12 at 3:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Have you executed the procedure using the EXEC statement?

You must first create the procedure by running the CREATE PROCEDURE command, and then execute it with the EXECUTE command. Please read this tutorial.

http://databases.about.com/od/sqlserver/a/storedprocedure.htm

Try running

EXECUTE insertNewCustomer 1, '', '', 0

Modify your procedure as follows

CREATE PROCEDURE insertNewCustomer 
-- Add the parameters for the stored procedure here
@customerId char(8), 
@customerName varChar(20),
@customerAddress varChar(18),
@zipCode integer
AS
BEGIN
-- SET NOCOUNT ON added to prevent extra result sets from
-- interfering with SELECT statements.
SET NOCOUNT ON;

-- Insert statements for procedure here
INSERT INTO customer (customerId, customerName, customerAddress, zipCode)
VALUES (@customerId, @customerName, @customerAddress, @zipCode)
END
GO
share|improve this answer
    
@PrettSangda I'm attempting to provide direction please unflag –  dctucker Dec 1 '12 at 3:58
    
I says that my line 19 string or binary data would be truncated. –  DDDD Dec 1 '12 at 4:04
    
Ah, this is good, means it's attempting to INSERT. You should make sure the table can hold all of the data you're throwing at it though your INSERT command there. Also, if you want to bind the inputs (@customerID etc) you should put them into the INSERT statement within the CREATE OR ALTER PROCEDURE sequence. –  dctucker Dec 1 '12 at 4:06
    
I know that the customerAddress is larger than my varChar(18) but can't I force it to truncate it? –  DDDD Dec 1 '12 at 4:09
    
Sure use LEFT(@whatever,18) ... link –  dctucker Dec 1 '12 at 4:12

When you run the above script is for create your stored procedure in the database.

To execute your stored procedure after created.

E.g

exec insertNewCustomer  'xxx','xxx','xxx',0  

please take noted, your sample query not take the input arguments as the input to insert to your table

share|improve this answer

If you run the SQL Server code you've posted, it will create a stored procedure. It will not run the stored procedure or insert any rows into your customer table.

After you have created the stored procedure, it is available to call. Most people would call stored procedures using a language such as C#. I have no idea what, if any, other language you are using.

You can also run the stored procedure directly in SQL Server Management Studio using the EXECUTE command. (If you have SQL Server, you have the EXECUTE command.)

share|improve this answer
    
My answer contained a link. Did you click it? –  Jonathan Wood Dec 1 '12 at 4:10
    
There are examples near the bottom. Your stored procedure requires several arguments; however, it doesn't use them. –  Jonathan Wood Dec 1 '12 at 4:14

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