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I am trying to search a file for a name, and then print the following line. I originally solved it like this:

grep -A 1 "searchterm" filename

However, this searches for searchterm everywhere in the line; this is a problem because I only want matches in the first part of the line.

For example, if I'm looking for 1234 in the following file:

4567 otherstuff 1234
wrongsecondline
1234 otherstuff
rightsecondline

It's going to find 4567 otherstuff 1234 and wrongsecondline, when really I wanted 1234 otherstuff and rightsecondline.

Any thoughts on how to search only for the first item in a line, and then print that line and the second line? Thanks!

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grep accepts regular expressions as search terms. You should prefix the term with ^ and end it with $ e.g. ^1234 otherstuff$ –  dctucker Dec 1 '12 at 3:39
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using grep to print both the matching and the following lines:

$ egrep -w -A1 "^1234" filename
1234 otherstuff
rightsecondline

Using awk to achieve the same as the above:

$ awk '$1=="1234"{print;getline;print}' filename
1234 otherstuff
rightsecondline

Using grep to only print the line following a match (notice < before filename):

$ grep -w -H --label=dummy -A1 '^1234' <filename | sed -ne 's#^dummy-##p'
rightsecondline

Using awk to achieve the same as the above:

$ awk '$1=="1234"{getline;print}' filename
rightsecondline

†provided no two consecutive lines contain the search term, and that the last line in the file does not contain the search term


If you expect two or more consecutive lines to contain the search term, e.g.

4567 otherstuff 1234
wrongsecondline
1234 otherstuff once
1234 otherstuff again
rightsecondline

...then using awk statefully to achieve the same output as grep -A1:

$ awk 'pr_after{print;pr_after=0}$1=="1234"{print;pr_after=1}' filename
1234 otherstuff once
1234 otherstuff again
rightsecondline

...and using awk statefully to always print the line following a match, even if that line is a match itself:

$ awk 'pr_after{print;pr_after=0}$1=="1234"{pr_after=1}' filename
1234 otherstuff again
rightsecondline

...or using awk statefully to only print the non-matching line immediately following one or more matching lines, achieving the same output as grep -H | sed above:

$ awk '$1=="1234"{pr_after=1;next}pr_after{print;pr_after=0}' filename
rightsecondline

In the examples above, $1=="1234"{...} is a pattern/action rule that means if the first column equals the text 1234 then do ..., pr_after{...} means if variable pr_after is set to some non-zero non-empty value then do ..., getline means read the next line and continue execution with the statement after getline, whereas next means read the next line and restart evaluation at the first pattern.

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awesome! both work perfectly. i like the grep solution because it's faster. thanks!! –  chimeric Dec 1 '12 at 4:10
1  
Do not use getline unless you fully understand all of it's many caveats, see awk.info/?tip/getline. You already discovered one of them by not being able to match consecutive lines containing 1234, now try it with a file where the last line is 1234 and you'll see another one (that matching line will be printed [twice] instead of the non-existent line after it). –  Ed Morton Dec 1 '12 at 13:35
    
@EdMorton I'd hardly call them caveats, I actually fail to see how else you'd expect getline to work (like a non-existent peekline?.) Testing for the return value of getline (e.g. if(getline)print) deals just fine with the last-line-in-file scenario, but again, the getline examples above target well-formed input (e.g. each matching type A record always followed by a type B record) and are meant to be simple in that context. The stateful examples are correct in all cases but are more complex. –  vladr Dec 1 '12 at 14:53
    
getline works the way it works, I'm not saying it should change, just that you have to be aware of how it works if you're going to use it. In this case, yes, a test on it's return code at a minimum would be appropriate to get around the immediate issues. You had said that the awk/getline approach achieved the same as the grep approach but that's not the case in non-obvious but very real situations so it's worth stating what those are so the OP doesn't take the stated grep-equivalence as precise. –  Ed Morton Dec 2 '12 at 5:20
    
By the way, if (getline) is not how to test for a successful getline return, you need to test for it's return code being greater than zero as it can be less than zero for some failure cases. Again, see awk.info/?tip/getline. –  Ed Morton Dec 2 '12 at 5:37
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Using grep is perfectly reasonable for this assuming you don't want to enhance the selection criteria, but FYI the following idioms describe how to use awk to select a range of records given a specific pattern to match:

a) Print all records from some pattern:

    awk '/pattern/{f=1}f' file

b) Print all records after some pattern:

    awk 'f;/pattern/{f=1}' file

c) Print the Nth record after some pattern:

    awk 'c&&!--c;/pattern/{c=N}' file

d) Print every record except the Nth record after some pattern:

    awk 'c&&!--c{next}/pattern/{c=N}1' file

e) Print the N records after some pattern:

    awk 'c&&c--;/pattern/{c=N}' file

f) Print every record except the N records after some pattern:

    awk 'c&&c--{next}/pattern/{c=N}1' file

g) Print the N records from some pattern:

    awk '/pattern/{c=N}c&&c--' file

I changed the variable name from "f" for "found" to "c" for "count" where appropriate as that's more expressive of what the variable actually IS.

So for this case you could use idiom "c" above as:

awk 'c&&!--c;/1234/{c=1}' file
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