Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Are there any dangers to using %*c in scanf() to clear the buffer when necessary.

For example:

char c;
for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
  scanf("%c%*c", &c);
}

Or

char* str;
char c;
int i;
scanf("%s", str);
scanf("%d%*c", &i);
scanf("%c%*c", &c);

Should there be any concern for buffer overflows or other security issues? There seems to be no formal documentation for the usage of the asterisk in scanf this way for C (EDIT This is not true), so I'm having trouble finding out exactly what happens to the extra characters that are inputted. Is there a better way of clearing the scanf buffer in C?

share|improve this question
4  
Yes, no formal documentation at all. –  melpomene Dec 1 '12 at 3:55
    
@melpomene, the best comment I've seen, EVER on StackOverflow –  Aniket Dec 1 '12 at 3:59
    
@melpomene My mistake, I guess by 'official' I meant official C documentation, however I have just realized that it doesn't actually exist in the same way that there is JavaDocs for Java. I'm still wondering what happens to the suppressed character? Is it written to something like /dev/null on a Linux machine? –  hesson Dec 1 '12 at 4:04
    
You never said "official". If you want official (without paying money), open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n1256.pdf is your best bet (it's the C99 standard plus a few technical corrigenda). –  melpomene Dec 1 '12 at 4:10
1  
The suppressed character(s) are simply ignored; read and later overwritten or otherwise lost. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 1 '12 at 7:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You'll have better luck conceptualizing the task you're trying to accomplish as "how do I read and discard any junk that the user might've typed after what I care about", which will lead you to constructs such as

int c;
while ((c = getchar()) != EOF && c != '\n') ;  /* discard till end of line or EOF */

But also, you can avoid the entire problem by not using scanf in the first place, which is a good idea for several other reasons. Read entire lines with getline, if you have it, or fgets if you don't, and parse them by hand.

share|improve this answer
    
there is no getline() in standard C –  Aniket Dec 1 '12 at 4:03
    
@Aniket That's why I said if you have it. Good C libraries do. –  zwol Dec 1 '12 at 4:04
1  
@melpomene tell it to the guy who wrote this: en.wikibooks.org/wiki/C_Programming/… –  Aniket Dec 1 '12 at 4:17
1  
OK, different meaning of "library". The C standard library is an abstract specification. What you actually use in your programs is a concrete implementation of this specification (such as glibc), most of which provide functionality beyond what's described in the C standard. –  melpomene Dec 1 '12 at 4:19
2  
Then you mean there is no Standard C Language(and a Compiler) even? Because its just an abstract specification(ANSI C?) –  Aniket Dec 1 '12 at 4:24

there is no scanf buffer, but there is an "input" buffer. And the best way to clear it is to use rewind(stdin). But this approach has problems if the input has been redirected.

share|improve this answer

If you want to clear the scanf buffer, Here is

char c;
for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    scanf("%c", &c);
    while(getchar() != '\n')
        continue;
}

Or

char c;
for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    scanf("%c", &c);
    fflush(stdin);
}

However, your code is dangerous...

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please tell me why it would be dangerous my way? Also, I'm using C not C++, so would fflush(stdin) still work? –  hesson Dec 1 '12 at 3:47
    
If you enter a character, when you press Enter. scanf accept you input the characters also produce a newline character '\n' carriage returns will be fed into the buffer, next time call scanf, the newline character '\n' is assigned to the character variable c –  0x000000ff Dec 1 '12 at 3:48
    
There is no "scanf buffer" and fflush(stdin) is just wrong. –  melpomene Dec 1 '12 at 3:51
    
@melpomene I don't understand what you mean by "There is no 'scanf buffer'". Is this just semantics, or does scanf actually have no buffer? If it has no buffer, then how does it retain characters from previous inputs? –  hesson Dec 1 '12 at 3:54
1  
@hesson scanf does not retain characters, stdin does (and it may not even be stdin but something outside of the program). I don't understand what you mean by "is this just semantics, or does scanf actually have no buffer?". What do you think "semantics" means? –  melpomene Dec 1 '12 at 3:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.