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Usually I use the first implementation. Couple of days ago I found another. Can anyone explain me the difference between these 2 implementations ? The 2nd implementation is thread safe? What is the advantage of using inner class in the 2nd example?

//--1st Impl
public class Singleton{

      private static Singleton _INSTANCE;

      private Singleton() {}
      public static Singleton getInstance(){
          if(_INSTANCE == null){
               synchronized(Singleton.class){
                      if(_INSTANCE == null){
                          _INSTANCE = new Singleton();
                      }
               }
          }
      return _INSTANCE;
      }  
}

//--2nd Impl
public class Singleton {
      private Singleton() {}

      private static class SingletonHolder { 
            private static final Singleton _INSTANCE = new Singleton();
      }

      public static Singleton getInstance() {
            return SingletonHolder._INSTANCE;
      }
}
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1  
lazy vs non-lazy initialization. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 1 '12 at 4:27
1  
You might be interested to check this one: ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-dcl/index.html –  Vikdor Dec 1 '12 at 4:28
2  
@HovercraftFullOfEels no, the second is also lazy. –  Matt Ball Dec 1 '12 at 4:29
4  
Look, if you really need a singleton USE AN ENUM AND BE DONE WITH IT. </rant> –  Matt Ball Dec 1 '12 at 4:30
    
I Thank for everyone. Now I can understand these 2 implementations. –  sura2k Dec 1 '12 at 4:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The first implementation uses what is called a "double checked lock". This is a Very Bad Thing. It looks thread-safe, but in fact it is not.

The second implementation is, indeed, thread-safe.

The explanation for why the first implementation is broken is fairly involved, so I'd recommend you get a copy of Brian Goetz's Java Concurrency in Practice for a detailed explanation. The short version is that the compiler is allowed to assign the _INSTANCE variable before the constructor has completed, which can cause a second thread to see a partially-constructed object.

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1  
The first implementation can be very easily made thread safe in Java 5+ with volatile. –  Matt Ball Dec 1 '12 at 4:29
    
@MattBall: But as written it is not. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 1 '12 at 4:31
    
@Cameron Skinner: With volatile is the 1st one thread safe? –  sura2k Dec 1 '12 at 4:35
1  
Yes. But that's why you should avoid double-checked locking: it's too easy to screw it up. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 1 '12 at 4:36
1  
Why do we need to have a holder. Why cant we directly have this "private static final Singleton _INSTANCE = new Singleton();". It will still be singleton and initialized at same time –  Jatin Dec 1 '12 at 5:04

The first implementation is only and only thread-safe if the _INSTANCE is made volatile. The second one is thread safe because the _INSTANCE is only initialized once the SingletonHolder is loaded by the class loader.

So when the inner class is accessed for the time (much later than the whole program was loaded), the class loader loads the inner-class and initializes the variable. So for any later access, the object is readily available Hence the method getInstance() is thread-safe.

The beauty of the second implementation, is you dont have to worry about synchronization or count as class loader does it for you

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No, the first is not. Double-checked locking is not thread-safe. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 1 '12 at 4:28
    
It is @CameronSkinner given that the variable is made volatile –  Jatin Dec 1 '12 at 4:31
    
As written, the implementation is not thread-safe. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 1 '12 at 4:31
    
Updated the post –  Jatin Dec 1 '12 at 4:33
2  
Better. I didn't downvote, but I would be removing it if I had :) –  Cameron Skinner Dec 1 '12 at 4:35

#1 is designed to ensure lazy initialization. But, in the given case, #2 ensures lazy initialization too. _INSTANCE is created only when Singleton.class is loaded, and Singleton.class is loaded on first invocation of getSingleton(). There is no other method in the class. No double checked locking needed. And of course in #1 _INSTANCE should be volatile.

Note: I do not agree that double checked locking is bad. When implemented correctly it may be very useful.

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The first code snippet is an example of the double-checked locking idiom, which used to be quite popular but is now known to be unsafe and should never be used.

The second snippet uses the combination of the semantics of class loading and of the final keyword, as defined by the Java language specification, to ensure lazy initialization and thread safety, so it is much better.

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final doesn't ensure either lazy initialization or thread safety. The second implementation is taking advantage of the way class loading works. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 1 '12 at 4:33
    
@CameronSkinner: yes, but the definite assignment semantics of final ensure that only one instance is ever assigned, and that the write is safely published to other threads. –  Daniel Pryden Dec 1 '12 at 4:36
    
Fair enough. final still has nothing to do with laziness, however. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 1 '12 at 4:37
    
@CameronSkinner: true enough. See my edit. –  Daniel Pryden Dec 1 '12 at 4:41

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