Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a data.table test with 3 columns: Year, ID, Count (see first 3 columns below). I want to add a fourth column to summarize across ID and Year like so:

setkey(test, Year, ID)
test[, annualCount := sum(Count), by=list(Year, ID)]

What I got looks weird: it seems that function [ automatically add 1 to my annualCount. For example, ID 210 with Y1 should give me 8 instead of 9.

Is it a bug in data.table?

    Year       ID    Count  annualCount
 1:   Y1      210        1            9
 2:   Y1      210        1            9
 3:   Y1      210        0            9
 4:   Y1      210        1            9
 5:   Y1      210        1            9
 6:   Y1      210        1            9
 7:   Y1      210        1            9
 8:   Y1      210        1            9
 9:   Y1      210        1            9
10:   Y1     3197        1            6
11:   Y1     3197        1            6
12:   Y1     3197        0            6
13:   Y1     3197        1            6
14:   Y1     3197        1            6
15:   Y1     3197        1            6    

Update: I am using R version 2.15.0 (2012-03-30), but I installed data.table_1.8.6. When I installed this package, I got an warning that this version was build on 2.15.1. Is this the cause for the bug?

Update 2: I installed latest R (2.15.2 at this time), but it doesn't help. With the same dataset, if I call

  test1 <- test[, list(annualCount = sum(Count)), by=list(Year, ID)]

then I get the correct result. But if I call

test2 <- test[, list(annualCount = sum(Count, na.remove = T)), by=list(Year, ID)]

then [ automatically add 1 to my sum. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to replicate this dataset with this error from scratch.

Update 3: dput(test) output.

structure(list(Year = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
                                  1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L), .Label = c("Y1", "Y2", "Y3"), class = "factor"), 
               ID = c(210, 210, 210, 210, 210, 210, 210, 210, 210, 
                            3197, 3197, 3197, 3197, 3197, 3197), 
               Count = c(1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0)), 
          .Names = c("Year","ID", "Count"), class = c("data.table", "data.frame"), 
          row.names = c(NA, -15L), .internal.selfref = <pointer: 0x7fb6dc000778>)

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
no bug for me, I get 8 and 5 with your data! –  agstudy Dec 1 '12 at 5:13
    
Thanks agstudy. I updated my question. BTW, when I try on another mock dataset, I couldn't replicate this bug. I am pulling my hair –  AdamNYC Dec 1 '12 at 5:21
    
maybe you need a coffee ! –  agstudy Dec 1 '12 at 5:36
1  
Use dput(test). –  BondedDust Dec 1 '12 at 6:07
1  
What is na.remove? I thought the correct argument was na.rm? –  Ananda Mahto Dec 1 '12 at 7:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is not a problem with data.table, but rather, human error ;)

To replicate, here is some sample data. I've included some NA values to see the results of the sum function with and without the argument to remove NAs, which is na.rm, not na.remove:

set.seed(1)
test <- data.table(Year = rep("Y1", 15),
                   ID = c(rep(210, 9), rep(3197, 6)),
                   Count = sample(c(0, 1, NA), 15, 
                                  prob=c(.2, .65, .15), 
                                  replace=TRUE),
                   key = "Year,ID")
test
#     Year   ID Count
#  1:   Y1  210     1
#  2:   Y1  210     1
#  3:   Y1  210     1
#  4:   Y1  210    NA
#  5:   Y1  210     1
#  6:   Y1  210    NA
#  7:   Y1  210    NA
#  8:   Y1  210     0
#  9:   Y1  210     1
# 10:   Y1 3197     1
# 11:   Y1 3197     1
# 12:   Y1 3197     1
# 13:   Y1 3197     0
# 14:   Y1 3197     1
# 15:   Y1 3197     0

Before we create our new column, let's just do some aggregation to see what happens with the different options for sum.

test[, list(annualCount = sum(Count)), by = key(test)]
#    Year   ID annualCount
# 1:   Y1  210          NA
# 2:   Y1 3197           4
test[, list(annualCount = sum(Count, na.rm = TRUE)), by = key(test)]
#    Year   ID annualCount
# 1:   Y1  210           5
# 2:   Y1 3197           4

Now, create your new column, with the results you expected.

test[, annualCount := sum(Count, na.rm = TRUE), by = key(test)][]
#     Year   ID Count annualCount
#  1:   Y1  210     1           5
#  2:   Y1  210     1           5
#  3:   Y1  210     1           5
#  4:   Y1  210    NA           5
#  5:   Y1  210     1           5
#  6:   Y1  210    NA           5
#  7:   Y1  210    NA           5
#  8:   Y1  210     0           5
#  9:   Y1  210     1           5
# 10:   Y1 3197     1           4
# 11:   Y1 3197     1           4
# 12:   Y1 3197     1           4
# 13:   Y1 3197     0           4
# 14:   Y1 3197     1           4
# 15:   Y1 3197     0           4
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again. I realize that sum(1, na.remove = T) yields 2. This is because R assume na.remove is a new logical variable with value T, and force it to 1 when input to SUM function. –  AdamNYC Dec 1 '12 at 7:31
    
@AdamNYC, I think there is also a package or two that might define na.remove so the error is understandable :) –  Ananda Mahto Dec 1 '12 at 7:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.