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public class Test {
    class Foo {
        int frob() {
            return 7;
        }
    }

    class Bar extends Foo {
        @Override
        int frob() {
            return 8;
        }
    }

    class Baz extends Foo {
        @Override
        int frob() {
            return 9;
        }
    }

    public static int quux(Bar b) {
        return b.frob();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(quux(new Bar()));//this line gives non-static variable this cannot be referenced from a static context
    }

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can fix this by declaring the nested classes as static, OR by instantiating Bar in the context of an instance of Test.

It fails because (the non-static) Bar must be instantiated in the context of an existing Test class instance; since main is static, there is no such beast.

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public static void main(String[] args) {
    Test test = new Test();
    System.out.println(quux(test.new Bar()));
}
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Your answer is as good as the accepted one except he posted it a minute earlier. –  Terry Li Dec 1 '12 at 6:02
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Non-static inner classes have a hidden reference to the enclosing class instance. This means you must have an instance of the enclosing class to create the inner class. You also have to use a special "new" function that correctly initializes the hidden reference to the enclosing class. For example,

   class Outer{   
        class Inner{
           public Inner() {
               System.out.println("Hello there.");
           }
        }

        public static void main(String args[]) {
            Outer o = new Outer();     
            Outer.Inner i = o.new Inner();
        }
    }
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