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I have a generic class that needs to limit an enum depending on the type defined:

public enum ConditionOperatorsString { None, Like, Equal }
public enum ConditionOperatorsDate { None, Equal, BeforeThan, AfterThan }
public class Condition<T>
{
  public T Value { get; set; }
  public ConditionOperatorsString Operator { get; set; }
  public Condition(T Value, ConditionOperatorsString Operator)
  {
    this.Value = Value;
    this.Operator = Operator;
  }
}

Now the problem is that i want the Operator type be dependant on T so when:

Condition<string> CStr= new Condition<string>(string.Empty, ConditionOperatorsString.None)
Condition<DateTime> CStr= new Condition<DateTime>(DateTime.Now, ConditionOperatorsDate.None)

How do I define the class Condition for that? I thought of an interface but enums don't inherit from interfaces.

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I know how to do this in C++, not that that helps. –  Logan Capaldo Sep 2 '09 at 11:38
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5 Answers

up vote -1 down vote accepted

If you make your field

public ValueType Operator { get; set; }

It'll work, but I'm not sure if that's what you want ...

-- Edit

What are you trying to do, anyway? C# has operator overloading, so perhaps that could be of use, instead?

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What i am trying is to restrict the enums values i receive depending on the type my condition<T> is. From a business-like perspective my condition represent a filter on the gui. So that i cannot have a before or after for a condtion that filters a string, only equal and like Likewise i cannot accept like for a date, only equal, before or after. The ValueType will accept anything as value wich is the opposite of what i am trying to achieve. –  Fer Sep 2 '09 at 3:57
1  
I'd probably go a different way. I'd have various comparators, and have them list what sort of methods they allow by having them implement various interfaces (IStringCompare, etc). –  Noon Silk Sep 2 '09 at 4:16
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There's no good way to do what you're trying to do without having, in your constructor something like:

if (typeof(T) == typeof(string) && 
    typeof(Operator) != typeof(ConditionOperatorsString))
{ 
    throw new Exception("Invalid conditionoperators value);
}

That's really not very useful, since you have to know, ahead of time, all the different possibilities for T.

What you could do, is something like this:

public abstract class ComparableBase<T,K>
{
    public T Value { get; protected set; }
    public K ConditionOperator { get; protected set; }
    // public abstract bool IsMatch(T other); // Is this required?

    protected ComparableBase(T value, K op)
    {
        this.Value = value;
        this.ConditionOperator = op;
    }
}

public enum ComparableOperator { None, Equal, Less, Greater }

public enum LikeOrEqualOperator { None, Like, Equal }

public class ComparableCondition<T> : ComparableBase<T,ComparableOperator>
{
    public ComparableCondition(T value, ComparableOperator op):base(value, op)
    {
    }
}

public class LikeOrEqualCondition<T> : ComparableBase<T, LikeOrEqualOperator>
{
    public LikeOrEqualCondition(T value, LikeOrEqualOperator op):base(value, op)
    {
    }
}

then you can declare

var condition1 = new LikeOrEqualCondition<string>("hi", LikeOrEqualOperator.Equal);

Do you need to have an IsMatch? Or is this to display the selected filter, without actually implementing it.

If you do, things are a teensy bit more complicated...

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Could the enum type just be another generic parameter e.g.

public enum ConditionOperatorsString { None, Like, Equal }
public enum ConditionOperatorsDate { None, Equal, BeforeThan, AfterThan }
public class Condition<T, TEnum>
{
  public T Value { get; set; }
  public TEnum Operator { get; set; }
  public Condition(T Value, TEnum Operator)
  {
    this.Value = Value;
    this.Operator = Operator;
  }
}

Might need more info though, not 100% sure how this is meant to actually fit in with the code that will make use of it

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This doesn't create any restriction that forces TEnum to be ConditionOperationsString when T is a string, or ConditionOperatorsDate when T is a DateTime. –  Nader Shirazie Sep 2 '09 at 5:21
    
Who is this meant to restrict, the programmer or end user? –  Grant Peters Sep 2 '09 at 6:46
    
I'd expect the programmer (and thus the user), because of "want the Operator type be dependant on T". It might just be a lot simpler to trust the programmer. –  Nader Shirazie Sep 2 '09 at 16:24
    
It is suposed to restrict the programmer of the client app. –  Fer Sep 2 '09 at 23:34
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You should include the enum type as a template parameter.

public class Condition<TValue, TOperator> 
{
    public TValue Value { get; private set; }
    public TOperator Operator { get; private set; }

    private Condition(TValue val, TOperator op)
    {
        Value = val;
        Operator = op;
    }
}

It would be nice to be able to add where TOperator : Enum, but I'm pretty sure the compiler doesn't allow that.

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Thanks for the answers.

I wanted to avoid to have more than one class but apparently it cannot be done. Based on the last comment from silky i got to a similar sollution as nader. Not the optimal one but it does the trick of restricting the enum, the con is that the client has to be aware that there are n classes:

public abstract class ConditionBase<T, E>
{
  public T Value { get; set; }
  public E Operator { get; set; }
  protected ConditionBase(T Value, E Operator)
  {
    this.Value = Value;
    this.Operator = Operator;
  }
}

public enum ConditionOperatorsString { None, Like, Equal }
public class ConditionString : ConditionBase<string, ConditionOperatorsString>
{
  public ConditionString(String Value, ConditionOperatorsString Operator) : base(Value, Operator) { }
}
public enum ConditionOperatorsDate { None, Like, BeforeThan, AfterThan }
public class ConditionDate : ConditionBase<DateTime?, ConditionOperatorsDate>
{
  public ConditionDate(DateTime? Value, ConditionOperatorsDate Operator) : base(Value, Operator) { }
}

Client use:

  ConditionString StrCond = new ConditionString(string.Empty, ConditionOperatorsString.None);
  ConditionDate DateCond = new ConditionDate(DateTime.MinValue, ConditionOperatorsDate.None);

I wanted to be able to use from the client something like:

  ConditionGeneric StrCond = new ConditionGeneric(string.Empty, ConditionOperatorsString.None);
  ConditionGeneric DateCond = new ConditionGeneric(DateTime.MinValue, ConditionOperatorsDate.None);
  ConditionGeneric InvalidStrCond = new ConditionGeneric(string.Empty, ConditionOperatorsDate.None);
  ConditionGeneric InvalidDateCond = new ConditionGeneric(DateTime.MinValue, ConditionOperatorsString.None);
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