Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

all. I'm encountering what seems to be a very strange problem. (It could be that it's far past when I should be asleep, and I'm overlooking something obvious.)

I have a []byte with length 8 as a result of some hex decoding. I need to produce a uint64 in order to use it. I have tried using binary.Uvarint(), from encoding/binary to do so, but it seems to only use the first byte in the array. Consider the following example.

package main

import (
    "encoding/binary"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    array := []byte{0x00, 0x01, 0x08, 0x00, 0x08, 0x01, 0xab, 0x01}
    num, _ := binary.Uvarint(array[0:8])
    fmt.Printf("%v, %x\n", array, num)
}

Here it is on play.golang.org.

When that is run, it displays the num as 0, even though, in hex, it should be 000108000801ab01. Furthermore, if one catches the second value from binary.Uvarint(), it is the number of bytes read from the buffer, which, to my knowledge, should be 8, even though it is actually 1.

Am I interpreting this wrong? If so, what should I be using instead?

Thanks, you all. :)

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You're decoding using a function whose use isn't the one you need :

Varints are a method of encoding integers using one or more bytes; numbers with smaller absolute value take a smaller number of bytes. For a specification, see http://code.google.com/apis/protocolbuffers/docs/encoding.html.

It's not the standard encoding but a very specific, variable byte number, encoding. That's why it stops at the first byte whose value is less than 0x080.

As pointed by Stephen, binary.BigEndian and binary.LittleEndian provide useful functions to decode directly :

type ByteOrder interface {
    Uint16([]byte) uint16
    Uint32([]byte) uint32
    Uint64([]byte) uint64
    PutUint16([]byte, uint16)
    PutUint32([]byte, uint32)
    PutUint64([]byte, uint64)
    String() string
}

So you may use

package main

import (
    "encoding/binary"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    array := []byte{0x00, 0x01, 0x08, 0x00, 0x08, 0x01, 0xab, 0x01}
    num := binary.LittleEndian.Uint64(array)
    fmt.Printf("%v, %x", array, num)
}

or (if you want to check errors instead of panicking, thanks jimt for pointing this problem with the direct solution) :

package main

import (
    "encoding/binary"
    "bytes"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    array := []byte{0x00, 0x01, 0x08, 0x00, 0x08, 0x01, 0xab, 0x01}
    var num uint64
    err := binary.Read(bytes.NewBuffer(array[:]), binary.LittleEndian, &num)
    fmt.Printf("%v, %x", array, num)
}
share|improve this answer
3  
You can avoid Read() and bytes.Buffer by just doing num := binary.LittleEndian.Uint64(array) –  Stephen Weinberg Dec 1 '12 at 13:25
    
@StephenWeinberg +1 I didn't knew that. I replaced my solution to use yours, which is cleaner. –  Denys Séguret Dec 1 '12 at 13:29
2  
It should be noted that these shortcut methods will panic if the input buffer is not large enough to hold the full requested data type. Using the binary.Read approach gives you an error return you can check. –  jimt Dec 1 '12 at 15:06

If you look at the function for Uvarint you will see that it is not as straight a conversion as you expect.

To be honest, I haven't yet figured out what kind of byte format it expects (see edit).

But to write your own is close to trivial:

func Uvarint(buf []byte) (x uint64) {
    for i, b := range buf {
        x = x << 8 + uint64(b)
        if i == 7 {
            return
        }
    }
    return
}

Edit

The byte format is none I am familiar. It is a variable width encoding where the highest bit of each byte is a flag.
If set to 0, that byte is the last in the sequence.
If set to 1, the encoding should continue with the next byte.

Only the lower 7 bits of each byte are used to build the uint64 value. The first byte will set the lowest 7 bits of the uint64, the following byte bit 8-15, etc.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.