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I recently read a tutorial on cross-browser event handling... Cross-Browser Event Handling...

I've adapted some practises from the tutorial to a generalised function that's floating around like so...

function isHostMethod(object, property) {
    var type = typeof object[property];
    return type === "function" || (type === "object" && !! object[property]) || type === "unknown";
}

var events = {
    add: (function() {
        if (isHostMethod(this, 'addEventListener')) {
            return function(element, type, handler) {
                element.addEventListener(type, handler, false);
            };
        } else if (isHostMethod(this, 'attachEvent')) {
            return function(element, type, handler) {
                element.attachEvent('on' + type, function() {
                    handler.call(element, window.event);
                });
            };
        } else {
            return function(element, type, handler) {
                element['on' + type] = handler;
            };
        }
    }()),
    remove: (function() {
        if (isHostMethod(this, 'removeEventListener')) {
            return function(element, type, handler) {
                element.removeEventListener(type, handler, false);
            };
        } else if (isHostMethod(this, 'detachEvent')) {
            return function(element, type, handler) {
                element.detachEvent('on' + type, function() {
                    handler.call(element, window.event);
                });
            };
        } else {
            return function(element, type, handler) {
                element['on' + type] = null;
           };
       }
    }())
};

usage:

var img_wrap = document.getElementById('img_wrap'),
    img = img_wrap.getElementsByTagName('img'),
    img_amount = img.length;

function do_stuff() {
    //
    //do stuff - update preloaded percentage, etc. 
    //
    events.remove(this, 'load', do_stuff);
}

for (var i = 0; i < img_amount; i += 1) {
    events.add(img[i], 'load', do_stuff);
}

This is what I'm curious about...
1. Is the 'isHostMethod' function necessary?
2. The tutorial warns about memory leaks and outlines an addition function for avoiding them using 'unique ids' as a reference to each element... This hasn't been included... Maybe I'm overseeing something but I don't think it's necessary in my case... OR should I be concerned?

jsfiddle here warning: the images are huge, take a while to download, lots of bandwidth, etc.

share|improve this question
    
The easiest way to deal with cross-browser issues like this is to use a library like jQuery or MooTools. Their authors have addressed most of compatibility issues so you don't have to. –  Barmar Dec 1 '12 at 7:57
    
@Barmar Thanks for the suggestion. I would normally use jQuery BUT I'm using this for a single page site, for a fellow student's/ friend's art portfolio. I'm avoiding jQuery cuz I feel that it's overkill to include a whole library for the support of one event listener 'load'. Thanks again for your suggestion. –  Terry Dec 1 '12 at 8:04
    
In that case, you probably don't have to worry about memory leaks, either. –  Barmar Dec 1 '12 at 8:04
    
@Barmar This is true, your totally right but I'm a javascript noob and I'm trying to learn things the 'right' way. Learning to code 'javaScript' while excluding memory leaks would be beneficial. I've read several blogs/tutorials on memory leaks but I can't identify to anything in my code causing any, perhaps noob oversight? Probably noob oversight... –  Terry Dec 1 '12 at 8:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

1.Is the 'isHostMethod' function necessary?

Nop, unless you persist to support IE6,7 and 8. Every modern browser uses addEventListener() and removeEventListener() now.

So I guess this is not acceptable, that's why people uses libs like mootools and jQuery. And they will take care that for you.

2.The tutorial warns about memory leaks and outlines an addition function for avoiding them using 'unique ids' as a reference to each element... This hasn't been included... Maybe I'm overseeing something but I don't think it's necessary in my case or should I be concerned about memory leaks?

It's depends. If you're going to build a Gmail, Stackoverflow, FB, G+ or Twitter, memory leak do matter a lot, as the pages on these sites barely refresh, and will live for a long time.

But if you just want to make a web page, attach some events and people will click on a link and move to next. As the context will be freed when they move on, even you do leak some memory, it won't cause any trouble (though I think you should try to avoid it, but it's not a must.)

And here is a tutorial from IBM on how to avoid memory leak (which is a little out-of-date, and some patterns are no longer leak memory.) It may help you.

And in practice, you can always profile memory usage using Chrome's inspector, which is a very powerful tool.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response! I've read several blogs/tutorials on memory leaks but I havnt come accross the one by IBM, gonna check it out now... Appreciate it! –  Terry Dec 1 '12 at 8:18

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