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Can someone please explain to me why when !sdesf is entered as zip code it says !sdesf is on the East Coast. Shouldn't it be !sdesf is an invalid zip code. Here's my codes

String zipCode;

    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);


    System.out.print("Enter 4-digit zip code: ");
    zipCode = input.nextLine();

    if (zipCode.charAt(0) <= '3')
        System.out.println(zipCode + " is on the East Coast.");

    if (zipCode.charAt(0) >= '4')
        if (zipCode.charAt(0) <= '6')
            System.out.println(zipCode + " is in the Central Plains area.");

    if (zipCode.charAt(0) == '7')
        System.out.println(zipCode + " is in the South.");

    if (zipCode.charAt(0) >= '8')
        if (zipCode.charAt(0) <= '9')
            System.out.println(zipCode + " is in the West.");

    else
        System.out.println(zipCode + " is an invalid ZIP Code.");   
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1  
Have you heard about curly brackets {}? –  Aleksandr M Dec 1 '12 at 9:38
1  
You asked for the same program, but different error here -> stackoverflow.com/questions/13657991/java-zipcode-program Try to continue in one thread and not create new ones for the same problem –  AsheeshR Dec 1 '12 at 9:43

2 Answers 2

You are comparing characters.

Characters are getting compared based on their ASCII values.

In this case '!'s ASCII value is less than '3's ASCII value, so you are getting as output:

!sdesf is on the East Coast
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1  
Well, based on their UTF-16 value. It happens to be the same in this case because the characters are in ASCII, and Unicode shares values with ASCII... –  Jon Skeet Dec 1 '12 at 9:43

The character '!' occurs before '3' in Unicode, so it's going into the first if.

You should validate that the zip code is valid before you try to work out what it means geographically.

You may want to use a regular expression to validate it - but if you're new to programming, it may be simpler just to use a loop and check that each character is greater than or equal to '0' and less than or equal to '9' (There may be more complicated rules for US zip codes - I don't know.)

Note that your code would be a lot clearer in terms of where you want the else to be useful if you used braces around each statement. For example, at the end I suspect you meant it to be equivalent to:

if (zipCode.charAt(0) >= '8') {
    if (zipCode.charAt(0) <= '9') {
        System.out.println(zipCode + " is in the West.");
    }
} else {
    System.out.println(zipCode + " is an invalid ZIP Code.");
}

Mind you, that's going to make every zip code which doesn't start with something greater than or equal to '8' invalid, and isn't going to do anything for zip codes which start with something more than '9'. Basically, you need to revisit how you're doing all of this...

As I recommended before though, I think a switch statement would be clearer:

switch (zipCode.charAt(0)) {
    case '0': // Is this valid?
    case '1':
    case '2':
    case '3':
        System.out.println(zipCode + " is on the East Coast.");
        break;
    case '4':
    case '5':
    case '6':
        System.out.println(zipCode + " is in the Central Plains area."
        break;
    case '7':
        System.out.println(zipCode + " is in the South."
        break;
    case '8':
    case '9':
        System.out.println(zipCode + " is in the West."
        break;
    default: // This handles any other character
        System.out.println(zipCode + " is an invalid ZIP Code.");
        break;
}
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