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What is the good programming practices you think in Java?

The reson I ask this question:

I always wonder if I am doing in the wrong way so I want to know more about the good practices.

One thing I am always confused with:

Should I always use this.xxxto refer the instance variable in order to distinguish them from local variables?

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closed as not constructive by Mark, Marko Topolnik, delnan, hirschhornsalz, Will Dec 3 '12 at 14:03

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There is no best practice in this respect. Some projects define such rules, others don't. Personally, I find that practice quite distasteful. –  Marko Topolnik Dec 1 '12 at 10:25
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are several ways to look at 'good coding practices'

  • Coding styles/idioms that is less prone to errors and guard against introducing new errors, thus leading to 'correct' code
  • Coing styles/idioms that are easier for others to read and maintain

In the first case, programmers adopt certain styles to guard themselves against introducing 'accidental' errors that can sneak into their code:

for Example in C, the following code is valid (but has a subtle bug)

if (x = 1)  // always evaluates to 'true' (programmer meant '==', not '=')
{
   // do something
}

so, in order to force the compiler to catch this error, you could adopt a style such as

if (1 == x) // if you accidentally typed '1 = x' the compiler will flag an error
{
   // do something 
}

Such styles/idioms are regarded as 'good' practices and there a quite a few that can be found for Java in books like 'Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship (Robert C. Martin'

Regarding the second case, writing 'this.xxx' enables the reader of the code to differentiate between a local/instance variable, so in the spirit of code readability, it is marginally better than directly referencing the variable as 'xxx'.

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thanks your reply. This is the longest and the most comprehensive answer :) –  code4j Dec 1 '12 at 12:52
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My recommendation is to use this whenever it helps to resolve potential ambiguity. this. is required when you need to use a member variable rather than a local method parameter of the same name.

use whwn situation comes like this:

public class ravi {

    public int x;
    public static float y;    

    public float getX(int x) {
        return this.x;
    }
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As far as the this.xxx question goes, yes, that's one way to differentiate. Other way is to have the local variable prefixed with a 'p' indicating it's a method parameter, so that you achieve something like this:

public void setField(Field pField) {
    field = pField; // instead of this.field = field, assuming field was the method argument.
}
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For general coding conventions this is a good book: Elements of Java Style http://www.ambysoft.com/books/elementsJavaStyle.html

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I only use this.xx in constructors and in setter functions for assignment if you choose the parameter name to be spelled exactly the same way as your class members. For example:

public void setName(String name)
{
     this.name = name;
}

This is to distinguish your class's name member from the parameter name.

Within a class, don't write this.xxx (though still syntactically correct), especially if all you want to do is to get its value. For example, the following is "ugly":

public String getFullName()
{
     return this.firstName + " " + this.lastName;
}

Just return firstName + " " + lastName; That's less writing.

You will encounter decisions that are far more significant than whether or not to write this.xxx, like whether to use inline functions or to have them as separate functions of a class, or deciding whether a class "is a" or "has a" class.

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