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I'm creating a Windows 8 JavaScript app, and I need to convert a string somewhat like this:

<p>
  blah blah blah
</p>
<div>
  <p>
    random dom stuff
  </p>
</div>

Into an XML DOM object, so I can traverse it with DOM methods (ie getElementByID()).

I've tried two ways

 //retrieve text to process
 var content = xml.querySelector("api > parse > text").textContent;

 //1
 var contentXML = new DOMParser().parseFromString(content, "text/xml");

 //2
 var newContentXML = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLDOM");
 newContentXM.async = false;
 newContentXM.loadXML(content);

Both fail. #1 with Only one root element is allowed., and #2 with Automation server can't create object. Can't load the ActiveX plug-in that has the class ID '{2933BF90-7B36-11D2-B20E-00C04F983E60}'. Applications can't load ActiveX controls.

Everywhere I've looked says #2 is how you should do it in IE, and I'm presuming W8 JS apps use the same JavaScript engine as IE.

How can I convert my text to an XML DOM object?

share|improve this question
1  
Your first item is that you are trying to create a document form something tha isn't a valid XML document. Wrap your string fragment with a dummy root element, then DOM parser root should work. –  Dominic Hopton Dec 1 '12 at 16:41
    
@DominicHopton I wondered about this. Does this root element need to be an <xml> (or a <html> maybe)? –  ACarter Dec 1 '12 at 16:57
1  
DOM Parser says it supports XML, so any root node; e.g. <FakeRoot> ** your content ** </FakeRoot> –  Dominic Hopton Dec 1 '12 at 23:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

DOMParser is fine, and the error is accurate. parseFromString returns an instance of a document, but your text doesn't define a single document root, it's a concatenation of two: a paragraph and a div.

The following will work:

<div>
  <p>
    blah blah blah
  </p>
  <div>
    <p>
      random dom stuff
    </p>
  </div>
</div>

By the way with your original string,

  • Chrome's DOMParser implementation will also throw an error "Extra content at the end of the document"
  • Firefox yields "XML Parsing Error: junk after document element."
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, well I changed it to parseFromString("<div>"+content+"</div>", "text/xml");, however I still got an error - ` XML5633: End-tag name does not match the corresponding start-tag name.. Do you have any clue why this might happen? As far as I can see div` is the same as div, and I'm 99.99% sure that the HTML inside content is correct, it renders properly in my browser. (BTW, thanks for your help. :) ) –  ACarter Dec 2 '12 at 17:54
1  
well, rendering in browser doesn't mean it's valid markup. There's a quick and dirty validator here - perhaps grab the content string via a VS debug session and check. I tried with the simple sample above and your modification is working fine for me. –  Jim O'Neil Dec 2 '12 at 18:30
    
yeah, I don't have access to change the source of the webpage though, so that could be a problem. I might add the xml to the current dom, then retrieve it and process it. –  ACarter Dec 3 '12 at 17:50

IE is a pain and does things in a much more complicated way. While DOMParser works in most browsers, in IE you need to create an ActiveX object MSXML2.DOMDocument.6.0, MSXML2.DOMDocument.3.0 or MSXML2.DOMDocument - whichever is supported first. Here's some code that detects which to use:

var xml, tmp;
try {
    if (isIE)   // add your IE detection here
    {
        var versions = ["MSXML2.DOMDocument.6.0",
                "MSXML2.DOMDocument.3.0",
                "MSXML2.DOMDocument"];

        for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++){
            try {
                xml = new ActiveXObject(versions[i]);

                if (xml)
                    break;
            } catch (ex){
                xml = null;
            }
        }

        if (xml)
        {
            xml.async = "false";
            xml.loadXML(str);
        }
    }
    else {
        tmp = new DOMParser();
        xml = tmp.parseFromString(str, "text/xml");
    }
} catch(e) {
    xml = null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help, I'm about to load it up. I won't need the else { tmp = new DOMParser(); xml = tmp.parseFromString(str, "text/xml");} surely though, as it only needs to be compatibile with the IE engine. –  ACarter Dec 1 '12 at 15:30
    
I'm getting the same errors I got with the original ActiveX loading: APPHOST9603: Can't load the ActiveX plug-in that has the class ID '{88D96A05-F192-11D4-A65F-0040963251E5}'. Applications can't load ActiveX controls. File: default.html- one of those for each of the three DOMDOC types –  ACarter Dec 1 '12 at 15:39

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