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I am making a linked list program for my basic C assignment. However, I will always get the force closed error on .exe and get a segmentation fault on Ubuntu.

I tried to break it down and rewrite but I have no idea where the code fails.

I'd appreciate your help.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>


    struct node{
            char name[20];
            int mark;
            struct node *next;

    };

    struct node *addnode(char name[], float mark);


    int main(void){

            int j = 0;
            char StdName[10];
            float StdMarks;

            struct node *head = NULL;
            struct node *curr = NULL;

            head = curr = addnode('\0',0.0);

            for(j=0; j<3; j++){

                    printf("\nEnter StdName >>");

                    printf("\nMarks for %s >>", StdName);


                    curr -> next = addnode("", 5.5);
                    curr = curr->next;
            }

            curr = head -> next;

            j = 0;

            printf("\nnode\tName\tMarks");

            while(curr){

                    printf("\n%d\t%s\t%5.2f", j++, curr->name, curr->mark);
                    curr=curr->next;
            }

    return 0;

    }

    struct node *addnode(char name[], float mark){

            struct node *temp;

            temp=(struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
            strcpy(temp->name,name);
            temp->mark=mark;
            temp->next=NULL;

    return (temp);
    }
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Considered using a debugger? Try looking for gdb –  axiom Dec 1 '12 at 12:48
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A few mistakes:

  • '\0' is not a char[], but a char whose value is 0 and converted to a char* (NULL pointer). Use "" for an empty string. The compiler should have emitted a warning for this. Compile with warning level at highest and treat warnings as errors (so you cannot ignore them). For gcc the flags are -Wall -Werror.
  • StdName is not initialised and is never populated but is used in a printf("%s") call.
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Thanks! That worked :) –  Amin Husni Dec 1 '12 at 12:55
    
@AminHusni if this answers your question you should accept it :) –  mux Dec 1 '12 at 12:58
    
Sorry, I'm kinda new here. –  Amin Husni Dec 1 '12 at 13:13
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The first node you add you use a single char '\0' for name, when you should pass a string:

head = curr = addnode("", 0.0);

And also this doesn't point to the first node, it points to the second one:

curr = head -> next;

Should be:

curr = head;

I don't know what you intended to do with StdName but as hmjd said, it should be initialized to some value.

char StdName[] ="stdname";
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Alright, the code worked. It's the head = curr = addnode("", 0.0); problem. Thanks :) pastebin.com/6GreaqTv –  Amin Husni Dec 1 '12 at 13:12
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head = curr = addnode('\0',0.0); line is invalid. Your addnode function expects a pointer to characters array as first parameter. '\0' is an integer value equal to 0. You pass the name to strcpy which uses it as a pointer to source data. Since the pointer is 0 (== NULL), you get a crash.

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