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What is the best way to apply SelectMany to get a cross join of three or more sequences using only extension methods? Is there any other way to get a cross join?

Test Data

var a = Enumerable.Range(11, 2);
var b = Enumerable.Range(21, 2);
var c = Enumerable.Range(31, 2);

Expected Result

 X  Y  Z 

11 21 31 
11 21 32 
11 22 31 
11 22 32 
12 21 31 
12 21 32 
12 22 31 
12 22 32 

What I tried

Here's the code that works but I wonder if there's any alternative that'd be easier to read and understand:

var d = a
    .SelectMany(rb => b
    .SelectMany(rc => c, (y, z) => new { Y = y, Z = z}), 
                        (x, yz) => new { X = x, Y = yz.Y, Z = yz.Z });

The equivalent query expression is good but not what I'm looking for:

var e = from x in a
        from y in b
        from z in c
        select new { X = x, Y = y, Z = z };
share|improve this question
    
Why do you say that the last query expression is not what you're looking for ? In my opinion is the cleanest and easiest to read (and I'm really a fan of LINQ methods syntax...) –  digEmAll Dec 1 '12 at 13:30
    
So you cannot create any new method at all but just have to write it out every time ? Am I understanding the restrictions correctly? –  Esailija Dec 1 '12 at 13:36
    
@digEmAll Yes, it's much cleaner and easiest to read, it's just out of scope of this question. I just have a feeling that I miss something about the extension method syntax, that's all. –  Serge Belov Dec 1 '12 at 13:55
    
@Esailija I'm not sure I understand your question. –  Serge Belov Dec 1 '12 at 13:56
    
@SergeBelov I am wondering why do you write it manually, when you can just make a method like d = CrossJoin( a, b, c ...)? You cannot get easier to read and write than that... –  Esailija Dec 1 '12 at 14:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can simplify (even if not much) your SelectMany query in this way:

var res = a.SelectMany(X => b.SelectMany(Y => c.Select(Z => new { X, Y, Z })));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's what I was looking for. –  Serge Belov Dec 1 '12 at 13:58

You could use a Join that projects keys that always match.

var e = a.Join(b, x => true, y => true, (x, y) => new { A = x, B = y })
         .Join(c, x => true, y => true, (x, y) => new { x.A, x.B, C = y });

Admittedly, it's probably less efficient than your SelectMany version.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for suggestion, I didn't think of using Join. –  Serge Belov Dec 1 '12 at 13:58

I am still not sure if it's ok to make a custom method. But here it is anyway:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> CrossJoin<T>(params IEnumerable<T>[] sequences)
{
    IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> result = new[] { Enumerable.Empty<T>() };
    foreach (var sequence in sequences)
    {
        result = result.SelectMany(i => sequence.Select(s => i.Concat(new[] { s })));
    }
    return result;
}

If you add such a method, then the code that matters will become very readable:

var d = CrossJoin(
    Enumerable.Range(11, 2),
    Enumerable.Range(21, 2),
    Enumerable.Range(31, 2)
);

Result:

Console.WriteLine("X  Y  Z");
foreach( var item in d ) {
    Console.WriteLine(String.Join( ",", item ));
}
/*
X  Y  Z
11,21,31
11,21,32
11,22,31
11,22,32
12,21,31
12,21,32
12,22,31
12,22,32
*/
share|improve this answer
    
I know see what you meant. That's good suggestion, too, thanks. –  Serge Belov Dec 1 '12 at 14:43

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