Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So, I want to create a function that takes a list of multiple strings and tuples, and what it does is, if its a string, it just prints the string, but if its a tuple, the tuple takes an integer and a string and it multiplies them.

Example:

print(something(["1stString", "2ndString", (3, "Pie"), (4, "Soda")]))

and it prints:

1stString
2ndString
Pie
Pie
Pie
Soda
Soda
Soda
Soda

My miserable attempt:

def something(s):
    for x in s:
        if isinstance(s, str):
            print(s)
        if isinstance(s, tuple):
            x = tuple[0] * tuple[1]
        print(x)
    exit()

This works for the strings but not for the tuples.

It prints out:

1stString
2ndString
(3, 'Pie')
(4, 'Soda')

What am I doing wrong?

One more thing. How about if I want it to print it out as a list?

Like this:

['1stString', '2ndString', 'Pie', 'Pie', 'Pie', 'Soda', 'Soda', 'Soda', 'Soda']
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

As NPE said you are checking s not x. s is the whole list of elements while x is a placeholder for the current element of s.

def something(s):
    for x in s:
        if isinstance(x, str):
            print(x)
        if isinstance(x, tuple):
            for i in range(x[0]):
                print x[1]
share|improve this answer
    
Ahhh, that explains alot, it works now, thank you very much. Im still new to this langugage and I'm still figuring out how it works. –  Neox Dec 1 '12 at 14:07
    
in the 2nd if, an "elif" would be slightly faster. –  LtWorf Dec 1 '12 at 17:17
    
Would be better to use: isinstance(obj, basestring) So you can detect both str/unicode –  barracel Dec 1 '12 at 22:06

One problem is that you're checking s and not x in isinstance:

isinstance(s, ...

I should also point out that this style of programming is very un-Pythonic. Perhaps if you explained why you're doing this, we might be able to improve on this approach.

share|improve this answer
    
Homework. I just followed the approach my teacher gave me. –  Neox Dec 1 '12 at 14:05
2  
Tell the teacher that a random person on the Internet says that they are teaching you bad habits :) –  NPE Dec 1 '12 at 14:06

Python 3.2:

    def something(s):
            for i in s:
               if isinstance(i,str):
                    print(i)
            else:
                print(i[0]*i[1])

it will print

    1stString
    2ndString
    PiePiePie
    SodaSodaSodaSoda
share|improve this answer
    
No it won't, it will just complain about the very odd indentation. –  LtWorf Dec 1 '12 at 17:25

I would use a generator function:

def yielder(sequ):
    for E in sequ:
        if isinstance(E,str):
            yield E
        else:
            ss = E[1]
            for i in xrange(E[0]):
                yield ss

li = ["1stString", "2ndString", (3, "Pie"), (4, "Soda")]

print li
print '----------------------------'
print list(yielder(li))
print '----------------------------'
print '\n'.join(yielder(li))

result

['1stString', '2ndString', (3, 'Pie'), (4, 'Soda')]
----------------------------
['1stString', '2ndString', 'Pie', 'Pie', 'Pie', 'Soda', 'Soda', 'Soda', 'Soda']
----------------------------
1stString
2ndString
Pie
Pie
Pie
Soda
Soda
Soda
Soda
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.