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I am currently working on a Windows 8 app which needs to store some tables. Currently, I am using XML files with XDocument classes to solve the purpose. It employs save and load methods using GetFileAsync and CreateFileAsync etc. Moreover, there save and load methods are called by different events. However, whenever there are repeated calls, an exception is thrown telling me that file access is denied. Expected behavior - more details here! While there are dirty methods to avoid this (like using locks and such) I am not very happy with the results. I'd rather prefer databases. Moreover, I am planning to write another app for Windows Phone 8 (and possibly a web version) which will make use of the data.

They have been repeatedly saying that Windows 8 is cloud based. Now the question: What is correct way to store my data? XML seems right but is has problems I mentioned above. What would be ideal cloud based solution involving Windows 8, Windows Phone 8 and possibly Azure? All I want is to store tables and make those accessible.

Sorry if the question seems unclear. I will provide information if required.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you want to use Azure, the easiest way to proceed is Windows Azure Mobile services. It allows you to setup your database and webservices using a web interface in a few minutes.

It's quite cool, allows you to add custom javascript to your web api logic, and generates json web apis. There are client Libraries for Windows 8, Windows Phone and iOS. You could easily roll your own for any http enabled frontends.

However be aware that taking the cloud route means that your app won't work offline, (if you don't code a cache system that is. And a cache will requires a local DB.)

About the local DB You really have to possibilities: 1) A real DB in your app, like SQLite. It's available as a Nuget package but right now ARM support isn't available out of the box, nor guaranteed by the team. If you don't need arm, Go try it :)

2) plain old file storage, like you did before. I personally often do that myself. You will however get issues when accessing it from different threads (Access Denied errors).

When you store things in a local file, don't forget to lock the critical sections (ie when you read or write to the file) to prevent the access denied exceptions. To be sure, Incapsulate your write/read logic in a service class instance unique within your app. (Use the singleton pattern for instance, or anything equivalent).

The lock itself, now. I imagine that you are using async await. I like this sweet thing too. But classic C# locks (using the lock keyword for instance) don't work with async await. (And even if it worked, blocking wouldn't be cool).

That's why the marvellous AsyncLock comes into play. It's a lock, but which -approximately- doesn't block (you await it).

public class AsyncLock
{
    private readonly AsyncSemaphore m_semaphore;
    private readonly Task<Releaser> m_releaser;

    public AsyncLock()
    {
        m_semaphore = new AsyncSemaphore(1);
        m_releaser = Task.FromResult(new Releaser(this));
    }

    public Task<Releaser> LockAsync()
    {
        var wait = m_semaphore.WaitAsync();
        return wait.IsCompleted ?
            m_releaser :
            wait.ContinueWith((_, state) => new Releaser((AsyncLock)state),
                this, CancellationToken.None,
                TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously, TaskScheduler.Default);
    }

    public struct Releaser : IDisposable
    {
        private readonly AsyncLock m_toRelease;

        internal Releaser(AsyncLock toRelease) { m_toRelease = toRelease; }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            if (m_toRelease != null)
                m_toRelease.m_semaphore.Release();
        }
    }
}

public class AsyncSemaphore
{
    private readonly static Task s_completed = Task.FromResult(true);
    private readonly Queue<TaskCompletionSource<bool>> m_waiters = new Queue<TaskCompletionSource<bool>>();
    private int m_currentCount;

    public AsyncSemaphore(int initialCount)
    {
        if (initialCount < 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("initialCount");
        m_currentCount = initialCount;

    }
    public Task WaitAsync()
    {
        lock (m_waiters)
        {
            if (m_currentCount > 0)
            {
                --m_currentCount;
                return s_completed;
            }
            else
            {
                var waiter = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
                m_waiters.Enqueue(waiter);
                return waiter.Task;
            }
        }

    }
    public void Release()
    {
        TaskCompletionSource<bool> toRelease = null;
        lock (m_waiters)
        {
            if (m_waiters.Count > 0)
                toRelease = m_waiters.Dequeue();
            else
                ++m_currentCount;
        }
        if (toRelease != null)
            toRelease.SetResult(true);

    }
}

you can use it this way (I suppose that you have an AsyncLock field named blogLock (taken from one of my own projects):

            using (await blogLock.LockAsync())
            {
                using (var stream = await folder.OpenStreamForReadAsync(_blogFileName))
                {
                    using (var reader = new StreamReader(stream))
                    {
                        var json = await reader.ReadToEndAsync();
                        var blog = await JsonConvert.DeserializeObjectAsync<Blog>(json);

                        return blog;
                    }
                }
            }
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I was thinking on the similar lines. However, the whole thing seems intimidating to a kid's eye. Let me break it down! I think I'll figure out database part on my own. Next thing you say (the 'quite cool' thing) 'Web API and Javascript logic' - a bit of elaboration would be helpful. Lastly, the cache part! What is good way to do it? Do we obtain data from servers and store it in local database native to that specific platform? –  akshay2000 Dec 1 '12 at 16:43
    
Ok, I will give you a detailed answer. But could you speak a little more of your app? –  Eilistraee Dec 1 '12 at 21:09
    
Sure. Its really simple. There are lots of items - say Person items. Person class has property category specified inside it. So, there is another class: Category. Person items are sorted on basis of Category - all handled inside the app. So, basically, there are two XML files now (should translate to two tables) - personitems.xml and category.xml. If I were to cache these tables, how should I go about it? I think I have figured out the server scripting stuff by following the tutorials. –  akshay2000 Dec 2 '12 at 12:34
    
Thaks a lot for updated answer. I'm more of a noob though. One last thing: Let's say I prefer databases and decide to use file based database like this, is there any recommended way to handle data both locally and in cloud. What I'm asking is, what is mechanism of caching and not method for that. It it good idea to sync changes based on timestamps? –  akshay2000 Dec 3 '12 at 11:32
1  
It really dépends on your app logic, and your expected merging algorithms. If the client can't change the data, it's easy. Cache it, and refresh the cache when internet is available. If the client can change the data, you can use a timestamp to merge, but what happens for instance if your client A get the data with Timestamp 1, change it at time 3 and when attempting to push the change to the server notices that someone (B) changed the data at timestamp 2. (with 1<2<3 ) Should A overwrite B? Or should the changes made by A cancelled? It really dépends on the app logic. –  Eilistraee Dec 4 '12 at 0:16

I've stumbled across this thread because I have basically the exact same problem. What seems staggering to me is that Microsoft makes its own enterprise-class database product (SQL Server), which already has a couple of lightweight, embeddable versions, and yet these seemingly can't be used with Windows 8/Windows Phone 8 applications to provide a local database. And yet MySQL can!

I've tried a couple of times to dabble in writing Windows Phone 8 apps, using my ASP.NET/VB/NET/SQL experience, but I always get bogged down in trying to learn a different way to perform data operations that I can do in my sleep in a web environment and lose interest. Why can't they make it easy to use SQL with W8/WP8 apps?

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If it helps, SQLite now works across WinRT and Windows Phone. Also, Windows Phone already had robust SQL CE for it. –  akshay2000 Aug 16 '13 at 16:23

If the data pertains to the user of the device look at using SQLlite ... there is a question on Stack about SQLlite and local winRT Databases here: Local database storage for WinRT/Metro applications

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  1. SQL Databases
  2. IndexedDB incase of the Windows 8 and JavaScript development
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Alright! I tagged C# so, let's talk about SQL! Apparently, SQLite is option for Windows 8. But what about the cloud? Let's say I manage to sync the database using something, but Windows Phone won't support it, would it? –  akshay2000 Dec 1 '12 at 15:58
    
By Cloud , what are you referring to ? Windows Azure etc. ? . –  Senthil Kumar B Dec 2 '12 at 16:26
    
Well, actually anything. If simply syncing whole database through RoamingFolder (it would be tiny - a few KBs) would solve the purpose, I'd go for it. But, I'm really digging Azure now. It would be helpful if you could help me caching the Azure database locally. –  akshay2000 Dec 3 '12 at 5:43

I know this is an old question that already has an accepted answer, but I'm going to get out my soapbox and answer it anyway because I think that rather than solve the technical problem it is better to use an architecture that doesn't depend on local database facilities.

In my experience very little data requires device local database services.

Most user generated data requiring local storage is non-roaming (ie device specific) user preferences and configuration (eg use removable storage setting). Game results fall into this category. Apps that produce larger quantities of user data are typically implemented on the desktop and almost certainly have a fast reliable connection to the local network, making server-based storage eminently suitable even for "fat" data like Office documents.

Reference data should certainly be server based, but you might choose to cache it. Nokia Maps on Windows Phone 8 is an excellent example of cached server-based data. The cache can even be explicitly pre-loaded in anticipation of off-line use.

The world view I have just expounded has little use for a local SQL Server. If you want a query engine, use LINQ. Express your application settings and user data as an object graph and (de)serialise XML. You could even use Linq2Xml directly on the XML if you don't want to maintain ORM classes.

Data of any sort that ought to be available across all the user's devices really needs to be cloud stored anyway.


To address some of akshay's comments,

Map data

Geospatial data is typically organised into structures known as quad-trees for a variety of reasons broadly to do with providing a level of detail that varies with zoom. The way these are accessed and manipulated derives considerable advantage from their representation as object graphs, and they are not updated by the users, so while this data certainly could be stored in a relational database and it probably is while it's being compiled, it certainly isn't stored or delivered that way.

LINQ is well adapted to this scenario because it can be applied directly to the quad-tree.

The data certainly is in a file. But I imagine you meant direct file access rather than indirection through another process. Probably the thought in your mind is that it is a good idea to invest significant effort on thoroughly solving the problems of concurrency and query processing once and share the solution between client apps. But this is a very heavyweight solution, and the query processing aspect is already well handled by LINQ (which is why I keep mentioning it).

Your XML problems

Read-only doesn't need to lock, so avoid the file system locking problem by caching and using Singleton pattern...

public static class XManager 
{
  static Dictionary<string, XDocument> __cache = new Dictionary<string, XDocument>();
  public static XDocument GetXDoc(string filepath)
  {
    if (!__cache.Contains(filepath)
    {
      __cache[filepath] = new XDocument();
      __cache[filepath].Load(filepath);
    }
    return _cache[filepath];
  }
}
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1. I've described problem with using (XML) file based storage. 2. Local database may not be necessary, but it makes life way easier. This applies to caches. 3. I'd be really surprised if Nokia Maps used file based storage instead of a database. 4. Desktops don't always have connections. Also, that's no reason to restrict data to desktops. –  akshay2000 Sep 25 at 9:23

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