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I have the following scenario:

  1. Create a new class library project called Lib1 1.1. Add a new control called control1, Themes/generic.xaml file and specify the default style of control1.
  2. Create a new class library project called lib2. 2.1.Add a new control called control2, Themes/generic.xaml file and specify the default style of control2. In the dafaultStyle of control2 I use control1.

My question is: Do I have to copy/paste the defaultStyle xaml of control1 into the generic.xaml of lib2, to use control1 with its style applied in control2?

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2 Answers 2

The default style lookup for a Control is always done in the assembly that the Control is defined in. So if Control1 is defined in Lib1.dll, the default style will always be looked for in generic.xaml in Lib1.dll. It doesn't matter where the Control is being used from.

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Just to make sure I understand your answer correctly, I will restate it in my own words:

  1. You want to have a Silverlight class library (Lib1) that houses a control (Control1).
  2. You want to have a Silverlight class library (Lib2) that houses a control (Control2).
  3. You want to have the control use their respective generic.xaml files for respective control styles.
  4. Control2 is to include Control1 in its style definition, without redefining its style in the generic.xaml file from Lib2.

If this is correct, I will describe my answer below:

Yes, this is possible as Keith Mahoney said here. I will go into detail on his answer and an example.

Each Silverlight class library generates a Dynamic-link library (dll) when compiled. All the classes (controls) and resources (styles) are contained in these dll's. Thus, when you create a lib1 class library with a style resource for a control contained within, it will all be stored in the lib1 dll.


Below is my example of the solution:


Setting up the solution:

First, I created new solution (StackOverflow Example.sln). Then I added a new project to the solution of type Silverlight Class Library (Lib1 1.1). Please note that Silverlight does not always play nicely with spaces in the namespace, so you may want to (as I did) rename the namespace to Lib1. See "How-To's" section for details on how to do this. Next I added the second project to the solution of type Silverlight Class Library (Lib2 2.1). I again, changed the root namespace of this project to one without spaces. Finally, I added a Silverlight Application project to my solution (SLApplication). Please note that in adding the Silverlight application project, you will be prompted to add a web project or web page to your project for creating the Silverlight control. Either option will work, please use the best for your situation. I used the separate website option (default). Now, when we setup the two class libraries, we were given a default starter class1.vb file. Let's rename these file to Control1.vb (for Lib1 1.1) and Control2.vb (for Lib2 2.1) in the solution explorer. When we do this, Visual Studio 2008 asks us if we'd like it to rename the class to match this new name, Click 'Yes'. Next up, let's figure out how to setup the themes for each of our controls.


Setting up themes:

I will start with the first control library (Lib1 1.1). First, create a new folder under the root of the project; name it "Themes" (case doesn't matter). Under this folder, add a new item of type xml and name it generic.xaml. For help on how to do this, see the "How-To's" section. Open the generic.xaml file, if it isn't already open. Delete the xml declaration text that was automatically inserted for you, and use the following for your initial definition:

<ResourceDictionary
 xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/client/2007"
 xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">

    <!-- Styles go here. -->    

</ResourceDictionary>

Now, since our Control1 control lives in this class library, we will need to add an xml namespace declaration (xmlns) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XML_namespace -sorry about the non link, my rep needs to be higher.) to our generic.xaml file. To do this, add the following line: xmlns:lib1="clr-namespace:Lib1" before the grater than symbol (>) in the top declaration. Once this is done, we can layout a simple style. Please note that we're setting the default background color to "Red" in order to differentiate the two controls. Please see below for the simple style for Control1:

<ResourceDictionary 
 xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/client/2007"
 xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
 xmlns:lib1="clr-namespace:Lib1">

 <!-- Style for Control1 -->
 <Style TargetType="lib1:Control1">
  <Setter Property="Background" Value="Red" />
  <Setter Property="Template">
   <Setter.Value>
    <ControlTemplate TargetType="lib1:Control1">
     <Grid x:Name="LayoutGrid" Background="{TemplateBinding Background}">
      <TextBlock Text="Control 1" />
     </Grid>
    </ControlTemplate>
   </Setter.Value>
  </Setter>

 </Style>

</ResourceDictionary>

With this let's start with the Control2. This will be very similar to the previous declaration for Lib1 1.1. If you haven't already done so, please add the Themes folder and the generic.xaml file as you did for the first library (Lib1 1.1). Now, for this project, you will need a reference to the Lib1 1.1 project. If you need help doing this, please see the "How To's" section. Once this is referenced, open the generic.xaml file, if it isn't already open. The definition of this file is almost identical; however, we will also be referencing the other projects namespace as well. See below:

<ResourceDictionary 
 xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/client/2007"
 xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
 xmlns:lib2="clr-namespace:Lib2"
 xmlns:lib1="clr-namespace:Lib1;assembly=Lib1">

    <!-- Styles go here. --> 

</ResourceDictionary>

Notice that now we are not only referencing our own namespace (lib2) but also referencing the other control's namespace (lib1) in the xml namespace declaration. Also notice that in the non-local control library, we also must reference the assembly name. Since we want to use the control (and its style) from lib one, we will need a place to use it in this project. For this, I have setup a grid with separate rows for each control. Please note that we're setting the default background color to "Blue" in order to differentiate the two controls. Please see below for Control2's definition:

<ResourceDictionary 
 xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/client/2007"
 xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
 xmlns:lib2="clr-namespace:Lib2"
 xmlns:lib1="clr-namespace:Lib1;assembly=Lib1">

 <!-- Style for Control2 -->
 <Style TargetType="lib2:Control2">
  <Setter Property="Background" Value="Blue" />
  <Setter Property="Template">
   <Setter.Value>
    <ControlTemplate TargetType="lib2:Control2">
     <Grid x:Name="LayoutGrid">
      <Grid.RowDefinitions>
       <RowDefinition />
       <RowDefinition />
      </Grid.RowDefinitions>

      <lib1:Control1 Grid.Row="0" />

      <Grid x:Name="Control2" Grid.Row="1" Background="{TemplateBinding Background}">
       <TextBlock Text="{TemplateBinding Text}" />
      </Grid>
     </Grid>
    </ControlTemplate>
   </Setter.Value>
  </Setter>
 </Style>
</ResourceDictionary>

This just sets up the fact that we want to have styles. We now need to tell Silverlight that we want these styles to be applied to our controls.


Using themes:

In our classes, we have to tell Silverlight that these are going to be custom user controls, to do this, we need to inherit from Control (or any other UIElement control - for this example, we will stay simple, and use Control). In order to tell the control to use a style defined in the generic.xaml, we need to do this in our constructor of each control.

For Control1:

Public Sub New() MyBase.DefaultStyleKey = GetType(Control1) End Sub

For Control2:

Public Sub New() MyBase.DefaultStyleKey = GetType(Control2) End Sub

Now all we have to do now, is tell our web site to use our new control(Control2).


Setting up the WebApplication:

You will need to reference both class libraries from your web project. See "How-To's" section for details on how to do this. Open up the Page.xaml file in your web application project (SLApplication). Your default should look something like this:

<UserControl x:Class="SLApplication.Page"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" 
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" 
    Width="400" Height="300">
    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White">

 </Grid>
</UserControl>

We will add to this the xml namespace declaration for our Silverlight class library (Lib2 2.1) so that we may reference Control2. Now that we have referenced our class library, we can use any controls that are declared within. If you try to use the namespace without building after you add it to your xmlns declaration, you may not see any declared classes (controls) within. To fix this, build once. Please also note, that Visual Studio 2008 is sometimes weird about custom libraries, and may generate an error that says the custom library is not defined. This is fixed with a re-launch of the solution (Close Visual Studio and reopen). The final code to show the Control2 (which contains Control1) is as follows:

<UserControl x:Class="SLApplication.Page"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" 
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" 
 xmlns:lib2="clr-namespace:Lib2;assembly=Lib2"
    Width="400" Height="300">
    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White">
  <lib2:Control2 />
 </Grid>
</UserControl>

Now build, and run. If everything went well, you should see the following:

Screen Shot

The full project can be downloaded from Google Code: http://code.google.com/p/stackoverflow-answers-by-scott/wiki/1366075

Zipped source: http://stackoverflow-answers-by-scott.googlecode.com/files/1366075.zip


Enjoy!


How-To's:

Change project namespace

In the solution explorer expand the project on which you want to change the namespace, and double click on the "My Project". For Silverlight class library projects, you will have four tabs on the left, one of which is "Silverlight". Select this tab, if it is not already selected. Under the "Root namespace" textbox, change the namespace to your desired namespace.

Add 'generic.xaml' to project

In the solution explorer, right click on the project name. Click "Add", and then click "New Folder". This will create a folder under the root of the project. Name this folder "themes". Please note that case does not matter here. Right click on the "themes" folder, click "Add", then click "New Item...". A dialog box appears for you to select what item type you want to add. Click "XML File" under the Templates section. Change the name to generic.xaml under the name field (at the bottom of the dialog). Click Add.

Create a project reference

To create a project reference, right click on the project that needs the reference. Select "Add Reference..." from the menu. A dialog box will be displayed for you to choose the reference to add. Select the "Projects" tab at the top of this dialog. Select the desired project reference. If you do not see the project that you want to reference in this list, check that you have added the project to the solution.


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