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I saw on many blogs and also on many answers here on SO that people do Hotlink protection by using this code:

RewriteEngine on
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^$
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^http(s)?://(www\.)?mydomain.com [NC]
RewriteRule \.(jpg|jpeg|png|gif)$ - [NC,F,L]

which is also suggested by this tool.

I might be wrong, but isn't it trivial to trick this code? Doesn't a scraper simply need to use a simple subdomains like these ones to bypass the hotlink protection?

http://mydomain.com.scarper1domain.com
http://mydomain.com.scraper2domain.net

EDIT: FYI I use this code that I think is more bulletproof, but i'm happy to read your comments/critics about it.

RewriteEngine on
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^$
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^http(s)?://(www\.)?mydomain\.com/.*$ [NC]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^http(s)?://(www\.)?mydomain\.com$ [NC]
RewriteRule .*\.(jpg|jpeg|png|gif)$ - [F,NC,L]
share|improve this question
    
Is there anything after code you've pasted? If not then it could be bypassed because that rules will protect by hotlinking only if all other requests are rewritten after. –  piotrekkr Dec 1 '12 at 15:40
    
@piotrekkr: I didn't actually understand what you mean, but it could be a good point to look into. Could you explain more? Anyway it's not exactly the subject of the question. I mean even if you are righ the issue would happen with both the pieces of codes shown in the question. –  Marco Demaio Dec 1 '12 at 16:31
    
As most apache setups already redirect requests like example.com to example.com/, there is no need for the third condition in your edit. Scrapers don't even need to use subdomains, as they can just fake the http headers being sent. No way to prevent this. The rest of the code is okay. I would use this if I needed it. –  Gerben Dec 1 '12 at 18:20
    
I meant that if you have catch all dns record like *.example.com even not existsing subdomains will be catch. So if you know that image is at example.com/image.jpg and is protected by your .htaccess it can be baypassed by using address notexisting.example.com/image.jpg –  piotrekkr Dec 2 '12 at 11:10
    
@piotrekkr: notexisting.example.com does NOT bypass both .htaccess shown in my question, cause they both require urls to start (see the ^) with either www.mydomain.com or mydomain.com. –  Marco Demaio Dec 2 '12 at 17:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As most apache setups already redirect requests like example.com to example.com/, there is no need for the third condition in your edit. So the code would become

RewriteEngine on
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^$
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^http(s)?://(www\.)?mydomain\.com/.*$ [NC]
RewriteRule .*\.(jpg|jpeg|png|gif)$ - [F,NC,L]

Scrapers don't even need to use subdomains, as they can just fake the http headers being sent. No way to prevent this.

The rest of the code is okay. I would use this if I needed it.

share|improve this answer
    
I disagree on the statement: "As most apache setups already redirect requests like example.com to example.com/, there is no need for the third condition in your edit" anyway this is the most reasonable answer. –  Marco Demaio Dec 5 '12 at 13:12
    
@MarcoDemaio most setups have mod_dir enabled. Also most modern browser already add the tailing slash automatically. But if your server doesn't have mod_dir, you could just use !^http(s)?://(www\.)?mydomain\.com(/.*)?$ instead :-) –  Gerben Dec 5 '12 at 13:55

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