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I want to use this code in a more complex problem, but I didn't get it to work. Why isn't my matrix getting printed?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void print_mat(int **a, int n)
{
    printf("\n");
    int k,t;
    for (k=1;k<=n;k++)
    {
        for (t=1;t<=n;t++)
            printf("%d ", a[k][t]);
        printf("\n");
    }
}

int main()
{
    int i,j,n,**a;
    printf("Chess board size=");
    scanf("%d", &n);
    a=(int **)malloc(n*sizeof(int));
    for (i=1;i<=n;i++)
        a[i]=(int*)malloc(n*sizeof(int));
    for (i=1;i<=n;i++)
        for (j=1;j<=n;j++)
            a[i][j]=-1;
    print_mat(a,n);
    return 0;
}
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What is your actual output? If, e.g. "segmentation fault", that's something you should tell us. –  Russell Borogove Dec 1 '12 at 16:31
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4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You should first malloc for size of int * not int , change

a = ( int ** )malloc( n * sizeof( int ) );

to

a = malloc( n * sizeof( int* ) ); //also no need to cast.

Also, as @Russell Borogove suggested, change loop as for( i = 0; i < n; i++ ) instead of from 1 to n.

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Rather a = malloc(n * sizeof(*a));, but +1 for "no need to cast". –  user529758 Dec 1 '12 at 16:05
    
What about int (*a)[n]= malloc(n*sizeof(int[n])) ? –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Dec 1 '12 at 16:17
    
@RamyAlZuhouri, I don't get what are you referring to. –  Rohan Dec 1 '12 at 16:29
    
To allocate dinamically a pointer to array, so all the memory is adjacent and can use functions like memset to write on that memory that is an unique block. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Dec 1 '12 at 16:41
    
@RamyAlZuhouri, in that case you can do a = malloc(n*n*sizeof(int)). –  Rohan Dec 1 '12 at 16:47
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You will want to get in the habit of using zero-based indexes with C arrays, and display them as if they were 1-based only when presenting things to users.

Change your for (i=1;i<=n;i++) loops to for (i=0;i<n;i++). Likewise with j, k, and t.

As currently written, a[n] isn't an allocated pointer, and a[0][n] isn't within the a[0] buffer allocation. The result (gcc 4.2.1 on OSX 10.7.5) is a program crash.

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I know that, but for this particular problem it was more efficient to start from one instead of zero. –  Tudor Ciotlos Dec 1 '12 at 16:05
    
It's not "more efficient", just more familiar. In this case, it's also wrong - a[n] isn't an allocated pointer, and a[0][n] is off the end of the a[0] buffer allocation. Get in the habit of using 0 based indexes in C, and display them as 1-based only in user-facing display. Seriously. –  Russell Borogove Dec 1 '12 at 16:26
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The line

a=(int **)malloc(n*sizeof(int));

should read

a=malloc(n*sizeof(int *));
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a=(int **)malloc(n*sizeof(int));

change to a= mallo(n*sizeof(int*))

On some systems int and int* (pointers) can have same size but here may be this is creating the problem.

Also

for (i=1;i<=n;i++)
    for (j=1;j<=n;j++)
     a[i][j]=-1;

change it to

for (i=0;i<n;i++)
    for (j=0;j<n;j++)
    a[i][j]=-1;
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