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Context: this is for an engine, which is full of generic classes so that future users can extend certain parts of the behavior without concerning themselves with the inner workings of the engine itself.

Right now, I need a class C:

public class C
{
    public C Copy(params) { ... }
}

But also an extension class D:

public class D : C
{
    public D Copy(params) { ... }
}

Basically I have some generic classes, but I need a copy method (actually it's a "make a copy at a new location" method, but that's immaterial) which returns the right type.

public class SampleClass<T>
    where T : C
{
    public void Stuff()
    {
        ...
        T copy = favoriteThing.Copy(params);
        ...
    }
}

and etc. I could just cast it, and trust future implementers to get it right, but I'd rather make it all explicit with contracts. Are there any elegant ways to do this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One way might be to define an ICopyable<T> interface that's implemented by C and D:

public interface ICopyable<T>
{
    T Copy(params);
}

public class C : ICopyable<C> { ... }
public class D : C, ICopyable<D> { ... }

Now if SampleClass<T> constrains T to ICopyable<T>, it can call Copy and get back an object of type T without any casts:

public class SampleClass<T>
    where T : C, ICopyable<T> // added constraint
{
    public void Stuff()
    {
        T favoriteThing = ...
        ...
        ICopyable<T> copyable = favoriteThing;
        T copy = copyable.Copy(params); // no cast needed
        ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought of this, but doesn't this make the call to Copy ambiguous? –  Richard Rast Dec 2 '12 at 5:06
    
No: If T is D, then the above code will invoke D.Copy, not C.Copy, because only D.Copy implements ICopyable<D>. –  Michael Liu Dec 2 '12 at 5:25
    
Ohh, I get it. By registering favoriteThing as an ICopyable<T> instead of just a T, the call gets fixed up. Clever! Sorry that I didn't notice that tweak before. Accepted and upvoted and thanks :) –  Richard Rast Dec 2 '12 at 18:39

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